The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 7, 1991

An Arab View of TV News Based in LA, Arab American Television Provides an Alternative to Dan, Peter, and Tom
WHEN Nabil Baida wants news from the Persian Gulf war, he tunes into local Channel 18 (KSCI-TV) for a perspective not shown on major American networks:An Arab journalist in rubble-strewn Baghdad reporting 172 homes wiped out in a single raid north of...
Read preview Overview
A Victorian Garden Lives Again Long-Neglected Biddulph Grange Is Being Restored to Its Mid-1800s, Eccentric Glory Series: GARDENERS FOR ALL SEASONS. Part 2 of a S Series
`DO you think the man had a sense of humor?""He must have," head gardener Nigel Davis answers instantly. He adds, "He was very forward-looking, I think."The man in question was a Victorian industrialist named James Bateman. More exactly, it was his father...
Read preview Overview
`Awakenings' Shortcuts Fact to Stir Emotion FILM: REVIEW
OLIVER SACKS wrote the book called "Awakenings," and more recently he served as technical advisor for the movie based on it.The most remarkable thing about the two projects is how utterly different they are, even though one person - who was intimately...
Read preview Overview
Bush Proposes Sweeping Bank Deregulation
THE Bush administration Tuesday proposed the most fundamental banking reforms since the Great Depression.The proposals aim to revitalize the banking industry and make it competitive internationally by giving banks broad new powers, including the right...
Read preview Overview
Cause of Lending Slump Sought Greenspan Urges Banks to Loosen Purse Strings; Critics Say Fed Should Hike Money Supply. SLUGGISH US ECONOMY
CREDIT crunch. That revived phrase has stirred up something of a storm in economic and financial circles.Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan uses it to refer to the reluctance of commercial banks to lend money to businesses at this time. In...
Read preview Overview
De Klerk Deserves A Nobel Peace Prize
OVERSHADOWED by events in the Gulf, another important region of the world is moving steadily away from what seemed certain to be chaos and bloodshed, and instead toward the distinct prospect of peaceful evolution.The country is South Africa, long riven...
Read preview Overview
Did the NCAA Learn `Reform' from Russia?
IN the week before Desert Shield became Desert Storm, there was one headline among all the foreboding news that struck a hopeful note. It announced "the avalanche of reform measures" adopted at the National Collegiate Athletic Association's annual convention...
Read preview Overview
Eco-Economics
EVERY day of war in the Persian Gulf means good news for the world economy. Launch another Patriot missile or lose another Mirage fighter, and the weapons-plant assembly lines move faster. Clearing the rubble and rebuilding the blasted apartments of...
Read preview Overview
Emerging Plans Aim to Cut US Oil Imports New Bills Seek Mileage Standards, Research in Alternative Energy; Bush's Rhetoric Assailed
AMERICA'S energy policy can be summed up in two words: "import oil," says Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D) of Louisiana.Prodded by war in the oil-rich Persian Gulf, Senator Johnston, President Bush, and other Washington politicians now are crafting new strategies...
Read preview Overview
Employers Open New Routes for Workers Commuting to Suburbs
AN increasing number of blue-collar jobs are shifting from the city to the suburbs. For many inner-city residents the toughest challenge in following these entry-level jobs is finding transportation.A number of suburban employers and developers who need...
Read preview Overview
Face to Face with a Giant Canvas Fortress Series: ART NOW. Part 12 of a Series
OFTEN I remind myself that things are not always the way I would like them to be, that I have to see them for what they are, and that sometimes the things that make no sense at all are the plainest facts of life. Like walls. Frankly they get in the way,...
Read preview Overview
Germans Wary of Being Too Critical of Baltic Violence
GERMANY, Moscow's most-important link to Western Europe, is finding its Soviet policy under constraint these days.Like the United States, Germany has not been able to do much more than register strong displeasure over last month's violence in the Baltic...
Read preview Overview
Gulf War Puts Algerian Democracy on Hold
ALGERIA was supposed to be in the middle of campaign season right now, with what were to be the country's first national multiparty elections.Instead, much of the public is preoccupied with what is widely considered the destruction of Iraq, and the elections...
Read preview Overview
Haiti's New President Woos Army
THE Rev. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who won an overwhelming victory in Haiti's first democratic elections last December, takes office today before the National Assembly - and under the watchful eye of the powerful military.The new president's early morning...
Read preview Overview
How to Paint a Growing Picture with Plants
THE ART OF PLANTING. By Rosemary Verey, Little, Brown, 168 pp., $40</P><P>ARE you what Rosemary Verey - one of Britain's most respected gardeners and garden-writers - calls a "snowdrop snob?" In her book "The Art of Planting" (published...
Read preview Overview
I Can Hear Their Voices
`SPEAK the speech, I pray you, as I pronounc'd it to you, trippingly on the tongue...." So begins Hamlet's advice to the players. Having been an actor himself, Shakespeare knew how much the player relies on his speech - and his voice - to create a character,...
Read preview Overview
Japanese High-Tech in the Gulf
WHILE debate over the Gulf war has revealed sharp differences between the Japanese people and their leaders over their country's global role, it has also highlighted growing United States reliance on Japanese technology."This war reveals a dependency...
Read preview Overview
LDEF Satellite Big Success Gleaning Space-Effects Data Schoolchildren Participate in Earth Orbiter's Experiments
REMEMBER the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite that the space shuttle Columbia rescued a little over a year ago? It's turning out to be a treasure chest of scientific and engineering data.LDEF chief scientist William Kinard of the National...
Read preview Overview
News Currents
WAR IN THE GULF</P><P> President Bush is sending Defense Secretary Richard Cheney and Gen. Colin Powell to the Persian Gulf this week to help him decide if and when to launch a ground offensive to expel Iraq from Kuwait. Bush said Tuesday...
Read preview Overview
North African Regimes Buffeted by Winds of Antiwar Sentiment
ON the cover of a glossy Tunisian weekly, a menacing looking Saddam Hussein is described as "the man who makes the West tremble."If the Iraqi leader is the bane of the West, he is also the cause of a few jitters in the usually tranquil Mediterranean...
Read preview Overview
Oil Company PR Men under Fire IRAQ-CRISIS PROFITS
WHAT does it take to be an oil company public relations manager?"You have to be somewhat of a masochist because you're on the defensive, it seems like, all the time," says Jere Smith, director of media relations for Phillips Petroleum Company, in Bartlesville,...
Read preview Overview
Ruling out Sexual Harassment
SEXUAL harassment in the workplace takes many forms. Sometimes it is verbal, involving suggestive comments, lewd jokes, or offensive teasing. Other times it is physical, including squeezes, hugs, and explicit sexual advances.Now a Florida judge has determined...
Read preview Overview
`Super-Europe'? Not Yet
ONLY a few months ago, Euro-optimists enthused about the emergence of a new European superpower - big, united, and powerful.A dramatic united market program was reinvigorating the 12-nation Common Market. Germany was coming together at an extraordinary...
Read preview Overview
Sweetened with HOMEMADE SENTIMENT for Valentine's Day, a Chef Urges Diners to Restore `the Forgotten Course,' and Offers a Small, Chocolate Suggestion
FOR Cynthia Salvato, Valentine's Day is prime time to tout dessert. "The forgotten course," as she calls it, has been erased from too many people's lives."You don't have to have a huge sundae overflowing with goo," says the pastry chef and instructor....
Read preview Overview
Television Coverage of Gulf War Marks Entry into `New Territory'
SURREALISTIC, muffled reports from correspondents wearing gas masks; the sounds of bombs dropping; parades of military experts spilling a new lexicon of "sorties" and "collateral damage"; giddy initial reports of coalition military prowess; the confusing...
Read preview Overview
The Hidden Poor
THE very poor in America not only are an underclass. To a shameful extent, they also are an unseen class.In America's inner cities, poverty seems only to be deepening, and its attendant ills - drug addiction, alcoholism, crime - to be growing more dire.Yet...
Read preview Overview
The Reach of Prayer
I HAD been gripped by reports of the massive air campaign against Iraqi positions during the early days of war in the Persian Gulf. I was avidly following television reports. A correspondent reported a flash in the night and an explosion.Then something...
Read preview Overview
The US Must Keep Its War Aims in Focus
IT is not too soon - on the contrary it may be too late - to talk about war aims in the Persian Gulf. The guiding principle is: Fewer are better.Through all of its resolutions on the subject, the United Nations Security Council has limited itself to...
Read preview Overview
Turkey Lifts Language Restrictions on Its Kurdish Minority
PRESIDENT Turgut Ozal's call to lift the Kurdish language ban signals a major shift in Turkish policy toward its Kurdish minority.One motive for the switch seems to be Mr. Ozal's regional objectives after the Gulf war. The president has been talking...
Read preview Overview
US Public Wants Tighter Restraint on News
THE American public gives high marks to the news organizations for war coverage but wants increased control of how the news is covered, a Times Mirror survey reports.A 57 percent majority says that the military should increase its control over reporting...
Read preview Overview
War-Inflated Ship, Aircraft Insurance Rates Drop Back
WHEN the first bomb fell in the Gulf region 24 days ago, the cost of shipping in that region skyrocketed. War-related risks led to major insurance rate hikes, higher fuel prices, a drop in the number of planes and ships available, and time lags on shipping...
Read preview Overview