The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 19, 2010

3 Noteworthy Summer Mysteries
These summer thrillers offer adrenaline-fueled trips to Saudi Arabia,Dublin, and the ski slopes.From a prizewinning literary novelist to a bestselling author with abrand-new hit TV show, this summer offers three noteworthy newmysteries intricate enough...
5 Famous Pork Projects: Beer Museum and More
Coined from an 1863 story called "The Children of the Public," pork-barrel spending referred to any public funds spent to benefit the public. Over time, the term has evolved, referring to projects seen as wasteful, or that may only benefit a small group...
AD; Has This Diagnostic Fad Run Its Course?
Like hysteria before it, ADHD has been a disorder of its time. And now it's time to leave it behind and make a commitment to helping children be their best.The idea of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as a credible diagnostic term has...
As California Budget Deadlock Drags, State Set to Pay Steep Price
To muddle through while the California budget crisis continues, state workers will be furloughed three days a month and the state will have to issue IOUs to pay bills. Still, there's little urgency in Sacramento.With California politicians locked in...
Bond Bubble or Not, Bonds Are Getting Risky
Investors who rushed into bonds to avoid risk may find precisely the opposite. Some call it a bond bubble.Safety seekers, beware! That big bond portfolio may be riskier than you think.A return of volatility has sent some stock investors running to the...
Case of Soup-Kitchen Thief Fuels Critics of Three-Strikes Laws
A California man sentenced to 25 years to life was released Monday because a judge ruled his sentence under a three-strikes law was too harsh for his crime - breaking into a church soup kitchen 13 years ago.Critics of "three-strikes" laws are hoping...
Congress Is Crushing Young Americans with Future Debt. Here's How They Can Fight Back
Faced with an untenable debt burden, America's youth must go beyond voting and start serving in Congress. But first they'll have to lower the age requirement.America faces a mammoth debt crisis. Imagine if the Berlin Wall were reconstructed with stacks...
Google TV: Why Hollywood Isn't Running Scared
Hollywood has long been skittish about new technologies. The VCR sent the industry into a panic. But Google TV? No worries. Hollywood has changed.From a distance - Google Earth, perhaps? - the brouhaha over the Internet search giant's overture to the...
Ground Zero and Beyond: Four Mosque Battles Brew across US
The bid to build a $100 million mosque and Islamic center two blocks from ground zero has ensnared a president and engrossed a nation. But New York isn't the only city debating a new mosque. Here are four of the most controversial battles nationwide.The...
Gulf Oil Spill Plume Stretches 21 Miles, Not Breaking Down Much
US and Australian scientists measured the plume from the Gulf oil spill during a research cruise. The findings are published Thursday.A plume of oil some 700 feet thick and at least 21 miles long has been detected deep beneath the Gulf of Mexico. It...
Gypsies Leave France amid Crackdown on Illegals
Gypsies deemed to be illegally in France boarded planes for Romania today. Since late July, authorities have been shutting down gypsy camps and rounding up illegals in a high-profile initiative.French President Nicolas Sarkozy's plan to crack down on...
Iraq War: Last US Combat Brigade Crosses into Kuwait
The last US combat brigade in the Iraq war crossed into Kuwait on Thursday, leaving behind 50,000 US troops in an unsettled country still struggling to form a government.The last US combat brigade crossed into Kuwait Thursday morning after a series of...
Life from a Laptop
A Christian Science perspective.It was, according to some, the long-awaited Frankenstein moment. Biologists and futurologists have for decades anticipated the creating of life-forms that, unlike all other life-forms since the Big Bang, have no parents....
Pakistan Floods: As International Aid Lags, US Announces Increase
Pakistan floods have left much of the country scrambling for food, health care, and shelter. The US is set to increase aid to Pakistan to $150 million Sen. John Kerry announced on Thursday.Amid United Nations reports of lagging aid for the Pakistan floods,...
Pakistan Floods: How New Networks of Pakistanis Are Mobilizing to Help
Pakistan flood aid is coming from new quarters as educated Pakistanis raise funds and distribute aid directly to victims of the flood. Activist networks have sprung up as the middle class has become more prosperous and organized.Ain-ul-Ghazala, a local...
Pakistan Floods: Why Aid Is So Slow Compared to Haiti Earthquake
Pakistan floods have displaced 4 million people, but aid to the country has been at a trickle compared to other catastrophes, such as the Jan. 12 Haiti earthquake.By the third week of the Jan. 12 Haiti earthquake aftermath, the outpouring of individual...
Pakistan Flood: Where Are Islamabad's Muslim Friends and China When It Needs Them?
The US has increased aid to Pakistan for the flood disaster. Saudi Arabia has, too. But other Muslim countries and big-ally China lag.The United Nations is sending out a cry for more international aid to cope with Pakistan's unprecedented flood, which...
'Pork Barrel' Spending: A Big Liability for Lawmakers in 2010 Election?
With the federal deficit at $1.5 trillion, some voters are balking at politicians who tout a record of securing 'pork barrel' projects.Once a selling point for lawmakers, congressionally directed spending - otherwise known as earmarks or "pork barrel"...
Roger Clemens Indicted: How Much Trouble Is He In?
Baseball star Roger Clemens was indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury on charges of lying to Congress during a 2008 hearing on steroid use. But proving perjury is difficult.How much trouble is Roger Clemens in?Well, he's in a heap of a mess in regards...
Stimulus and Tax Cuts Now, Smaller Economy Later, CBO Report Says
Stimulus spending and extending the Bush tax cuts can help a little in the short term, but they would likely hurt America's long- term economic outlook, a CBO report issued Thursday says.The Congressional Budget Office released an improved outlook for...
The Moon Is Shrinking. No, Seriously
The surface of the moon has moved the equivalent of a football field closer to the core during the past billion or so years.P.T. Barnum would have fun with this one: The incredible shrinking moon.But it's true. Images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance...
Troops Withdraw, but US Work in Iraq War Unfinished and Fragile
The last US combat troops leave Iraq Thursday, shifting the American role in the Iraq war from the Pentagon to the State Department, which faces a potentially unprecedented task.The key word defining the American effort in Iraq over the coming year will...
Unemployment Insurance Claims Hit 500,000 Last Week, the Worst in 2010
Unemployment insurance filings rose to 500,000 last week, reflecting continuing layoffs in the private sector and state governments. Economists say a healthy economy averages fewer than 400,000 claims per week.Fully 500,000 Americans filed new claims...
Why Facebook Enjoys Explosive Growth - despite Its Many Stumbles
Facebook's staggering growth rolls over critics on issues from ease of use to user privacy.A few weeks ago, the American Consumer Satisfaction Index ranked Facebook in the bottom 5 percent of all privately held companies in the United States. By that...
Why Iran's Nuclear Reactor May Not Be an Immediate Threat
Iran's Bushehr nuclear reactor is set to be loaded with fuel Saturday. Some hawks say bomb it now, but leading nuclear experts advocate a wait-and-see approach.Many breathless pundits have argued in recent days that the world faces a now-or-never window...
Why South Korea Is Blocking Access to North Korea's Twitter Account
South Korea is now blocking its own citizens' access to North Korea's Twitter account due to concerns that North Korean propagandists are using the social media website to subvert the South.In the latest drive to prevent what South Korea's government...