The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 31, 1994

A Hollow Referendum
"We expect a new conference, new peace efforts." - Radovan Karadzic, Bosnian Serb leader</P><P>THE rejection this week by Bosnian Serbs of a Western "contact group" peace plan for Bosnia should hardly come as a surprise. The Aug. 28 vote...
Big Guns in a Small Town Residents of This Strategic Riverside Community Once Again Find Themselves Pawns in Somalia's Clan Warfare
THIS small, riverside town of dusty streets, donkey carts, and - once again - big guns is militarily important in Somalia.Like a tempting plum, Belet Uen sits on the main road linking central and northern Somalia to the Indian Ocean-side capital, Mogadishu....
Congress Quietly Debates Merits of Warrantless `Spy' Searches Post-Cold-War `Black-Bag' Break-Ins Remain Highly Controversial
CITING national security concerns, federal agents have continued a cold war policy of secretly searching the homes and offices of American citizens suspected of aiding foreign powers.These "black-bag jobs," conducted without court orders, have gotten...
Consensus Emerges on Need to Slow Population Growth despite Controversy over Abortion and Birth-Control Methods, the UN Population Conference in Cairo Will Approve a Program for Global Action
WHEN 10,000 delegates, nongovernmental experts, and journalists gather in Cairo Sept. 5 to 13 for the start of a United Nations megaconference on population, the big news will be controversy.The stage is set in the Egyptian capital for a dramatic clash...
Developing Nations Win More Investment New United Nations Report Lists Asia as Top Region Attracting Foreign Investment by Multinationals, While Africa Fares the Worst
ADAM SMITH'S invisible hand is caressing Asia, ignoring the former Soviet Union, and slapping Africa.Economic principles put forth by the 18th-century British advocate of capitalism are being accepted wholeheartedly for the first time in decades by most...
Director of Paris Opera Reinstated for Season Opener
A JUDGE reinstated conductor Myung-Whun Chung as musical director of the Paris Opera Aug. 29, banning management from hiring substitutes to launch the new season.The dispute between the conductor and the Paris Opera is the latest to plague the opera...
Events
LOCKHEED, MARTIN MARIETTA PLAN MERGER Lockheed Corporation and Martin Marietta Corporation announced one of the biggest defense mergers Aug. 30, a $10 billion deal that will combine the makers of the stealth fighter and Titan 4 rocket under one roof....
For 35 Years, Castro Played a Big Man in a Little Country Tweaking a Giant's Nose
IN the spring of 1959, shortly after he had seized power in Havana, Fidel Castro Ruz visited the United States to give speeches and meet with United States government officials. In general, he made a good impression. The American Society of Newspaper...
For Boeing, Competition Means Alliances Partnerships Help Aspiring Asian Aerospace Firms but May Enable Company to Stay No. 1
EVEN before being expanded to produce the new 777 airplane, the Boeing Company's assembly plant north of Seattle was the world's largest building (in cubic feet). This Everett plant, where many workers ride bicycles to get around, symbolizes the huge...
Future UN Social Summit Hopes to Measure Progress by Human Scale, Not GNP the Summit's Focus: Poverty, Unemployment, Integration
IS there more to development than a rising gross national product (GNP) and a dazzling set of trade statistics?A resounding "yes" is coming from basement conference rooms of the United Nations where delegates of more than 150 nations, with input from...
Germany and Russia Spar over Plutonium Seizures Are `Tip of the Iceberg,' Bavarian Minster Says
WHEN it comes to nuclear smuggling, German authorities say the hypothetical has become reality. Now the challenge is to prevent the situation from mushrooming into a nightmare.The recent disclosures of four foiled nuclear smuggling attempts in Germany...
Human Rights Whisper
ON his visit to China this week to drum up business for US companies, Ronald Brown noted that as secretary of commerce, his role is "to promote the commercial interests of the United States."At that, he appears to be succeeding. So far during his delegation's...
Keep Cutting Nuclear Weapons
FOUR recent cases in Germany of attempted diversion of explosive nuclear material from Russia are only the most visible aspects of a much larger problem. Against the background of Russia's political and economic instability, the Russian nuclear arsenal,...
Quebeckers Poised to Vote for Separatist Party DEBATE WAS A DRAW
SOON, amid autumn's changing leaves, the people of Quebec will go to the polls and, if pundits are correct, sweep to power a revitalized provincial separatist party intent on breaking up Canada to gain Quebec independence.In the days before the Sept....
Reform Policies Aggravate Russia's Drinking Problems Closing of Labor-Treatment Camps Leaves Alcoholics with Few Options
BY 8 a.m., the bustling Belorussky train station in downtown Moscow is a showcase for Russia's massive drinking problem.Before entering the nearby subway or boarding a bus to work, hundreds of commuters have a bottle or two of beer, available in any...
Russian Army Pullout Means World War II Finally Ends in Baltics
AFTER five decades of defending the once-mighty Soviet empire, former Red Army troops in the Baltic states of Latvia and Estonia will close another chapter in cold-war history on Aug. 31, when they make the final retreat back home to Russia.The last...
Self-Control
THE Bible points out in the book of Proverbs, "He that hath no rule over his own spirit is like a city that is broken down, and without walls" (25:28). Many people lose their temper at times, pounding their desks, shouting and swearing. Others...
The Magic of Theater an Interview with Irish Actor Donal Donnelly
Actor Donal Donnelly values "Prefaces by Bernard Shaw" as much as any book he owns. "It certainly enlarges your vision of life, being exposed to him and to his prefaces," says Donnelly with a lovely Irish brogue. It's not a surprising choice, since over...
To Arabs, Accepting Israel Is Inevitable, Unsettling Peace Talks Have Their Momentum, but Raise Many Questions Series: A DEPARTING CORRESPONDENT LOOKS BACK. Part 2
WHEN Egyptian President Anwar Sadat made his dramatic overture to Israel 15 years ago, he not only condemned himself to death, he plunged his country into a decade of diplomatic isolation, ostracized by all its Arab neighbors.Today, it is those Arab...
US and China Sign Deals; Agree to Discuss Rights REOPENING A DIALOGUE
DURING a United States trade mission to China that has put dealmaking ahead of human rights, US Commerce Secretary Ronald Brown announced $5 billion in new business for US companies and said Chinese officials are ready to resume rights talks.Reflecting...
US Assuming Major Role at Cairo Population Talks Clinton Reverses View against Birth Control That Reagan Backed in '84 World Meeting
WHAT a difference a decade can make.At the last United Nations-sponsored conference on global population, held in Mexico City in 1984, the United States delegation declared population growth a "neutral phenomenon" having no particular impact on economic,...
US Can Help African Nations by Forgiving Bilateral Debt Debt-for-Development Swap Could Help Ensure That Money Saved Goes to Schools and Housing
AS camera crews leave Rwanda en route to the next crisis, Africa's plight remains a daunting challenge. Owing to a litany of tragedies, including civil wars, epidemics, and natural disasters, the United States and the West have just about exhausted themselves...
US Machine-Tool Manufacturers Rebound after Foreign Trouncing Continued Success Lies in Taking the Contest to Expanding Foreign Markets, Analysts Contend Series: HONING US COMPETITION. Strong American Machine-Tool and Aerospace Industries Face Tough Competition from Asia and Europe. Machine-Tools Sector Hits Turbulence Boeing Navigates without Subsidies
UNITED States manufacturers owe some of the credit for their widely hailed resurgence to the low-profile makers of machine tools.Laboring in the shadows of auto, steel, and other manufacturers, small machine-tool workshops provide the essential building...
Verona's Venerable Opera Winds Down a Rousing Season Spanish Tenor Placido Domingo Was the Major Attraction at This Summer's Festival, with His Five Performances in `Otello' and as Conductor of `Aida'
VERONA, a beautiful Italian city already rendered romantic as the home of Shakespeare's great lovers, Romeo and Juliet, comes alive in July and August with its open-air opera festival.The spectacular site of the performances is the world's third-largest...
When It Comes to Soil and Genetic Engineering, Proceed with Caution
THERE'S a new note of caution for applying the wonders of genetic engineering down on the farm. Unexpected effects may show up where farmers least expect them - in their soils.Plants and microbes genetically altered to be pest resistant, more nutritious,...