The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 16, 1996

Africa's Oil Is Cheap, but Often a Hassle Market Trends Tempt Big Oil Producers
Judging by the numbers, West Africa sounds like a more attractive place to do oil business in than the North Sea. West Africa has reserves of 25 billion barrels, which cost $3.50 per barrel to produce. In contrast, the North Sea has reserves of 15 billion...
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A Lending Paw and a Wag of the Tail Is All in a Day's Work Training Schools for Dogs Brings Them into Service for the Disabled
Someone is pounding on the front door. Inside the apartment, Mica, a brown Pomeranian springs into action. Racing up to the door to check out the noise, she turns, dashes across the living room, and scoots around a corner into the bedroom. There, a person...
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Blockbuster Shows Reveal Mass Appeal of Great Art It Satisfies Spiritual Hunger, Need for Authenticity
Man does not live by bread - or politics, or TV game shows - alone. We also seem to need great art.A report on leisure-time activity published in The Washington Post said several years ago that more people attend art museums than sports events, movies,...
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Debate Human Rights Too
Presidential debates are occasions for candidates to show what they care about. To judge by the first debate, neither President Clinton nor Bob Dole cares much about international human rights. If they want to change that impression, there's no night...
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Effort to Engage Voters Via Political 'Tupperware Parties' Series: The 96 Campaign
Bob Gunning perches on the edge of an armchair in his neighbor's family room, where he and a half-dozen friends and acquaintances have gathered to analyze the recent vice-presidential debate."So, {GOP nominee Jack} Kemp kept returning to the doubling...
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Feed the Hungry, 1996
Let's assume you are among the world's decently fed who contribute to relief of the starving. Half the American people do, according to the head of an international aid coalition, who describes many ways to help in "'Food Security' Means More Than Calories"...
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'Food Security' Means More Than Calories
World Food Day (Oct. 16) is the annual celebration of the day in 1945 when the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) was created. People in 150 nations will raise money, plant gardens, collect food, dig wells, or join a global teleconference to...
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Getting a New Leash on Life: A Dog Service Program Grows
National Education for Assistance Dogs Services (NEADS) started in 1976 as a smaller place - and smaller concept - on the campus of Holliston Junior College in Lenox, Mass., using money given by the Medfield (Mass.) Lions Club. It was then a hearing-dog...
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Guns Holstered, Bosnians Warm Up to One Another
When Mike Shaffer was called to break up an illegal police checkpoint, he expected the usual: stony-faced officers harassing a civilian driver from the "other" ethnic group. But what he saw delighted him: Two Serbs and three Muslims - all cops - chatting...
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Heaven Isn't Boring Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
A group of my friends got to talking about movies they had seen, in which ghosts, spirits, and angels were depicted, as well as heaven and hell. To most of the group, heaven seemed very dull, a place where people floated around all dressed in white,...
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High Costs Make Americans Slow to Pick Up Cellular Phones
The last time America revolutionized telecommunications, it freed long-distance calling from heavy regulation, and the rest of the world rushed to catch up. In today's revolutionary shift to wireless telephones, the United States is lagging behind.Want...
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In Idaho Tribal Case, High Court Revisits Scope of States' Rights
In an unusual court case, an Idaho Indian tribe is attempting to reclaim aboriginal land under a lake and two rivers in a remote section of the American West.In one sense, the fight between the Couer d'Alene Tribe and the State of Idaho is a simple property...
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In More Classrooms, It - Literally - Pays to Read Programs Offering Cash Incentives Gain in Popularity but Stir Controversy
At a dingy field house in the shadow of Chicago's Cabrini-Green public housing project, fourth-grader Asia Willingham struggled all last summer to read seven books. Her incentive? Cold cash.Asia earned $2 for each book she passed a test on, or $14 -...
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Military Bans Pulpit Politicking Lawsuit Challenges Gag Order as Unconstitutional
The Pentagon has issued new orders to its chaplains: the pulpit is no place for politicking.A gag order placed on military chaplains this summer - forbidding the discussion of legislation during sermons or counseling - is being challenged in a lawsuit...
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My Proper Name Has a Comic French Twist
Whoever asked the question, "What's in a name?" probably had a good, solid name like William Shakespeare.Try that question on Candy Barr, a grade-school classmate. Or Charlie Brown, a brilliant high school debater whose name never failed to prompt a...
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Nations Anxious, Apathetic, Sometimes Aghast at US Vote
American presidential elections are usually front-page news all over the world. From Amman to Amsterdam, citizens of other nations know that White House decisions can affect their own lives at a stroke - so they're often intensely interested in who the...
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Perry, Pushing Arms Deal, to Hear a 'Nyet' in Russia
United States Secretary of Defense William Perry faces an extremely stiff challenge during his Oct. 16-18 visit to Moscow, as he seeks to persuade the Russian Duma (lower house of parliament) to ratify a nuclear arms limitation treaty that it has done...
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Pressing the Flesh While Bowing, Japanese-Style in a Choreographed Campaign, a Politician Asks for 'Dynamic Politics'
Japanese democracy doesn't get much respect. Politicians here traditionally have won votes by dispensing pork-barrel projects, not by mastering policy. Once elected, they are more or less at the mercy of the bureaucrats who really run the country.But...
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Saving Bosnia from US Political Games A Number of Obstacles and Unresolved Problems Remain
Relatively little attention has been paid to events in Bosnia-Herzegovina since the arrival of the NATO-led implementation force (IFOR). This may be good news because the killing and human deprivation that attracted so much attention have ceased with...
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Sizzling Dow: Will the Market Next Go to 7,000 - or 5,000?
How high the Dow?As the stock market bull charges through the 6,000 barrier, small investors across the United States are wondering how long the stampede will last.The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 6,000 for the first time on Oct. 14, less...
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Spotlight on E. Timor
Since the mid-1970s, the struggle of the East Timorese people to loosen Indonesia's iron grip on their political and cultural lives has occasionally broken into public view, often because of some particularly vicious act of repression.But the relative...
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The Big Beef over One Little Name
Mary Blair's name is as good and Scottish as Robert the Bruce's or Flora MacDonald's. But it is not, as it happens, the personal tag of this redoubtable Scots lady that has brought her 15 minutes - or more accurately three or four weeks (to date) - of...
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The Bigger the Bulb, the Bolder the Blossom
When you buy bulbs you are, in effect, buying packaged plants. Stem, leaves, and flower bud, the complete package is all wrapped up in the fleshy part of the bulb. This acts first as a protective shield and then as a source of food when growth starts...
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The News in Brief
THE USA UCLA study of 114 TV series last year showed only five were violent. President Clinton hoped to use the report on TV violence with hopes in his campaign agenda. The report, financed by the major networks, is part of a three-year study seeking...
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The Post-Impressions of Manet and Gauguin in Paris
Edouard Manet: Rebel in a Frock CoatBy Beth Archer BrombertLittle, Brown and Company 505 pp., $29.95 Paul Gauguin: A Life By David Sweetman Simon & Schuster 600 pp., $35 Elegant, courteous, consummately Parisian from his top-hat to the tip of his polished...
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Tiptoe through the Travails and Travels of Tulips A Bulb That Shaped and Colored History
In the Paris Farmer's Union here in Maine, boxes of spring-flowering bulbs from Holland, have sprung up alongside the winter wheat, clover, trefoil, and other seeds of fall. Even farmers with next year's corn and pumpkin crops on their minds pick over...
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Tracing the Passionate Struggles of Edgar Degas
On most days in the late 1880s, a slightly stooping, middle-aged Edgar Degas would shut himself up in his Paris atelier, his self-described "fortified enceinte (enclosed space)."Strangers were ignored. Even old friends, after ringing the bell downstairs,...
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US Envoy Draws Blank on 11th-Hour Africa Trip Africans Oppose US Positions on Nigeria, UN, Peace Force
Secretary of State Warren Christopher's first visit to sub-Saharan Africa was meant to convince a struggling continent that the US was not abandoning it.Whether he succeeded in that mission remains to be seen. But what is certain is that he has few concrete...
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Why Voter Turnout May Hit Record Low in Campaign 1996 Series: The 96 Campaign
Sigh. The two young ladies slump back on the ledge outside the White House gate when asked about their interest in the election campaign."I liked the first debate," says Christina Smiley, a Bob Dole fan. But GOP vice-presidential nominee Jack Kemp "didn't...
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