The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 30, 1999

A Giving Mentality
I give money to street people: punkers and panhandlers, the sick and healthy, druggies and drunks, the unkempt and the recently bathed, old and young, the well behaved and the floridly insane. But it's complicated.Once I gave $10 to a black man in his...
A Horse with a Course of Her Own
Grandpa gave me a chestnut mare one summer called Betsy. Her relatives worked out in the west desert as cow ponies, but Betsy hadn't taken a liking to the family business. Grandpa looked doubtful when I talked about riding her. "I thought you might get...
A Millennium Is a Millenium Is a Milennium
There are many soaring hopes for the new millennium. I have a rather humble one: that we learn to spell the word correctly. Unfortunately, in the Scrabble Game of Life, there is an apparent shortage of N's.I recall an exchange with a decorated television...
A Revolutionary Traditionalist
It was a perfect summer Saturday in the Berkshires, the kind of day that has attracted hordes from Boston and New York for generations to this western Massachusetts county known for quaint towns, modest green mountains, and cool breezes.But in Williamstown,...
A Small Trend, but a Very Big Family Adoption of Siblings, While Still Difficult, Gains Momentum
At church, the Hughes family fills the front two pews. At breakfast, the kids put away three boxes of cereal and two gallons of milk. Some days, Shirley Hughes goes to the supermarket twice, saying, "The kids eat it all on the way home."But through it...
Britain Leads in Campaign Finance Reform the New Laws Will Clean Up How Political Parties' Activities Are Financed and Run
Britain's Labour government is poised to pass draconian campaign finance reform laws that will make United States rules appear wimpish by comparison.Political analysts say the new rules will restore public confidence in political campaigns and clean...
Connections between Hate Crimes and 'Churches' Groups That Espouse Racial Hatred Attract Attention in Wake of Recent Attacks
A recent spate of crimes points up a growing connection - one that is troubling to many Americans - between hateful actions and organizations calling themselves churches.Two brothers from northern California reportedly linked to such a group were charged...
Cuba's Spicy Musical Stars Shine Again
One of the pleasures I experience as a member of the National Academy of the Recording Arts and Sciences is casting my vote for musicians deserving of a Grammy Award.Last year mine went to a group of Cuban musicians spanning four generations called the...
Filmmakers Brew Up Cult Hit with 'Blair'
Standing in the halo of a breezy industry-town afternoon, two stars from a cult-film-in-the-making, "The Blair Witch Project," appear cool and unflappable, a far cry from their final state of mind in the film.At first glance, they give few hints of the...
How Hope and Unity Came to Maine
Maine has a number of townships named for various whimsies, and one is named Hope for a preposterous reason.In the beginning, we're told, the surveyors ran the township's lines and set their witness stakes as they went, each stake with a letter on it:...
Israel's Ever-on-the-Move Settlers Cheap Homes Lure Families to West Bank, Though They Might Have to Move Again as Peace Talks Heat Up
Sharon Dahan and his wife, Laela, are moving again.Last summer, the young couple moved from Israel proper to this West Bank settlement near Hebron because they had some friends here, and the rent on their mobile home was cheap. Now, one baby boy and...
Letters
Keeping opinion makers honest I thoroughly agree with Paul Loeb's opinion piece on the current affectation of superior cynicism ("The cynical smirk that denies us the possible," July 26).I find that people today often offer only two choices - a mindless...
Much Ado about Shakespeare at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, the Stories and Language Keep Drawing Audiences Back
When the Oregon Shakespeare Festival opened its 1999 season with "Othello," a national television crew came out to see why 400-year- old plays were causing such a fuss. Teen heartthrob Leonardo DiCaprio as Romeo or the lovely Gwyneth Paltrow as young...
New Battle for Racial Set-Asides in Capital of New South, a Mayor Battles to Keep Affirmative Action for Contractors
In the tumultuous civil-rights struggle of the 1960s and '70s, Atlanta was one of the few Southern cities to remain largely above the fray - unmarred by bombs and riots.Nicknamed the "city too busy to hate," blacks and whites were able to work out many...
Overpaid Athletes? It's Fans That Make Them So
Senior sports columnist of The Christian Science Monitorrguably the easiest thing in the world to do, with the possible exception of pulling the covers over our heads in the morning, is to rail against others who make way more money than they deserve...
Pencils, Desks, Buildings, and a New Curriculum Post-Mitch Honduras and Nicaragua Undertake Education Reform as Well as Reconstruction of Schools
The dozen pupils looking over their new elementary school are pleased about improvements like new desks and bigger windows. Their old school was carried away by the flood waters of last fall's hurricane Mitch.But what really intrigues them are the ceiling...
Red-Hot US Economy Cools Down Slower Growth in the Nation's Economic Output Could Reduce the Pressure on the Fed to Hike Interest Rates Again
Someone's turned the air conditioning up on the nation's economy. The overheated job machine and consumer spending that have been worrying federal regulators are finally taking a break.The result: The economy - perhaps - has slowed to the point where...
Renovated Art-House Cinemas Turn Profits Theaters Now Feature Stadium Seating, Latest Technologies
Good news for grown-up movie fans: Hollywood is learning that there's money to be made in "art" movies as well as mega- blockbusters.As a result, the art-house cinemas, long associated with sticky floors, sprung seats, and dodgy sound systems, are being...
Russia: No Lights, a Lotta Bombs
I was reminded the other day of a joke that went the rounds in Moscow in 1957. The Soviet Union, although dreadfully short of consumer goods, had managed to leap ahead of America in space by launching the first two orbiting satellites, one with a dog...
Sports 101
As pro football teams report to training camp this week, excitement builds among fans and teams. The Cleveland Browns and instant replay return, two new stadiums will open, and the Denver Broncos will try to survive without John Elway (who retired last...
Sun Protection Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
My ears and arms were bright red, and I was in pain. My friend also had a sunburn.We had been canoeing on a pond and just hadn't realized how much sun we were getting. I had been healed of a very severe sunburn before - through prayer. And I felt confident...
Theatergoers Buck Reviews and Strike out on Their Own
Michelle Newman doesn't know who Ben Brantley is - and frankly, she doesn't care. The young art director considers herself an avid theatergoer, but she merely scans the newspaper reviews of Broadway plays - which explains why she fails to recognize the...
The Monitor Movie Guide
STAR RATINGSExcellent ++++Good +++Fair ++Poor +The Worst DUDNEW RELEASESDEEP BLUE SEA (R)Director: Renny Harlin. With Samuel L. Jackson, Saffron...
The Row to Hoe for Farmers
With the senate soon to debate the agricultural spending bill, the plight of some American farmers is back in the spotlight.Prices for farm commodities - especially corn, wheat, and soybeans - have plummeted. Driving them down is a combination of bad...
Today's Story Line
When I first met Amala Garcia several years ago, she was dealing with police issues as a member of the Mexico City assembly. She struck me as someone with empathy and quiet integrity - the kind of person that would ideally be at the reins of a democracy....
To Protect Kids, the Internet Will Police Itself Technology
Parents who worry about their children cruising the Internet have just gotten an important new safety belt.In an extraordinary collaboration of some of the biggest names in online and high-tech companies, the Internet industry is launching a new Web...
Twin Brothers Make Poignant Film about ... Twins in Love
Movies about twins can't be called a major genre, but there's a long tradition of pictures on this multifaceted subject, stretching from little-known curiosities - like the 1935 thriller "Murder by Television," starring Bela Lugosi - through modern-day...
Twists of Diversity
The Oregon Shakespeare Festival is well-known for diversity in play selection and in acting company and artistic staff. So much so that it's no big deal to see an outstanding lead actor like Derrick Lee Weeden, an African-American, play Coriolanus and...
USA
President Clinton flew to Europe for a conference today on the Balkans, where NATO recently waged a 78-day air war against Serb-led Yugoslavia. At the meeting in Sarajevo, the president will be seeking support from Western leaders for what he has described...
What's on TV
shows worth noting for JULY 31-AUGUST 6Listings are not necessarily recommended by the Monitor. All times Eastern, check local listings.SUNDAY 8/1Cirque du Soleil: Quidam (Pay Per View, 7:30-9:30 p.m.): For the first time, the magic, majesty, and...
Will a New Marshall Plan Work in Balkans? Western Leaders Meet Today to Discuss Rebuilding Effort, but Integrating Region with Rest of Europe Will Be Hard
Western leaders today are looking beyond the smoking ruins of Kosovo and Serbia toward what they hope will be a historic breakthrough for the war-torn Balkans region of Europe.But how to get there? How to bring together the many warring factions in Europe's...
Woman Cracks Mexico's 'Machismo'
That wasn't said may be the best measure of the progress of women in machismo-bound Mexico.When Amalia Garca Medina assumed the presidency of the nation's main left-center political party yesterday, the fact that she is a woman did not even come up in...
World
Dozens of world leaders are expected to meet in Sarajevo, Bosnia- Herzegovina today to discuss the implementation of a Western-backed "stability pact." It is aimed at promoting democracy, disarmament, and economic recovery in war-ravaged southeastern...
Young Turks (with Cash) Dodge Draft $5,200 Can Keep Recruits from Going to Fight against Kurdish Rebels
Turkey's most popular rock singer, Tarkan, may not be Turkish for much longer. The star has held out serving in the military, and while he tours in Europe his country is stripping him of his citizenship.Tarkan may be Turkey's most prominent draft dodger...