The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 5, 2001

Afghan Alliance Fighters Unite on Ruined Front
The stout general hoisted himself up the steep metal staircase of the airport control tower and surveyed the nearby front line - as close as it gets to the capital, Kabul. The windows are gone. The buildings below are in ruins. The carcasses of scavenged...
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A Last Working Day for Ironman of Baseball
It's the last home stand of his career, in the dog days of the season, and Cal Ripken Jr. is the first player to take the field for warm-ups. Some 3-1/2 hours before game time, he walks with a fresh gait, despite having played a 15-inning road game...
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A Matter of Ethics for Cloak-and-Dagger Set ; If US Is to Halt Global Terrorism, Will It Allow Its Spies to Use More 'Dagger'?
The CIA's cloak-and-dagger department had an urgent issue for the boss. An undercover agent had infiltrated a terrorist group in the Middle East. But the cell's leaders had told him that, to prove himself, he had to assassinate a government official....
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A Renewed US Focus on Mideast Conflict
Greater involvement seems likely, as administration seeks to build antiterrorism coalition with moderate Arab states. The Bush administration may have its plate full, building and sustaining an international coalition against terrorism, but the Israeli-Palestinian...
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A Tense Wait near Afghan Border
Parents of aid workers, whose trial may resume Sunday in Kabul, are among worried families. An Afghan 12th grader thinks of a grandmother in Kabul she has never met. American parents from Texas pray here for a daughter now on trial in a Taliban court....
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Beyond Flag-Waving
As time goes by, I wonder if the events of Sept. 11 are making a difference in our everyday lives. The memorial services and fundraising events have all been tremendously healing. I've also heard lots of sound bites on TV from people who claim to...
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Biochem Terror: A Reality Check
After Sept. 11, experts assess the threat of bioterrorism attacks. The fear of imminent chemical or biological attack by terrorists that is gripping millions of Americans is unfounded. But the chances that someone is planning something of the sort...
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Capitalizing on Museums ; with Nearly 100 Already - Housing Everything from Art to Airplanes to Squished Pennies - and More on the Way, Washington Is the Nation's City of Museums
Next spring, the International Spy Museum will open in Washington - a sure lure for anyone interested in the secret (soon to be not- so-secret) history of espionage around the world. It will sit a block away from the Smithsonian American Art Museum...
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Dawn of Galaxies Now in Focus
Astronomers have finally found one of the most sought-after objects in the universe - a small aggregate of hot gas and young stars that could be one of the building blocks of the very first galaxies. The object was detected because a large mass stood...
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Deep in the Woods, the Best Restaurants in Maine
Caesar was not a witty writer, and left us, as I remember, but one feeble pun in the vulgar Latin. He promised his soldiers he would make them knights if they won the battle, and so he did - hostlers, all. The play comes on the low Latin word for...
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Government's Back, Big Time
This is a speech that President Bush could make but probably won't: "Fellow Americans: "I want to level with you about how the war against terrorism has forced me to depart from some of my most cherished beliefs. First, you know I have always been...
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J. Smith-Cameron's Role-Changing, Name-Changing Career
Actress J. Smith-Cameron has fashioned an impressive career on stage and in film. But what about her unusual name? It's the result of an identity change that started a long time ago. "I was called Jeanie when I was growing up. And in high school,...
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Layers of Meaning in 'Merchant' ; New Production on PBS Provides Insight; 'Local News' Is a Must-See for News Buffs
The Merchant of Venice is arguably the most difficult play in all the Shakespearean canon to produce. We know the savagery that anti- Semitism has wrought in the world all too well. The Holocaust hangs over our heads. And, indeed, the most famous...
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More Towns Beat the Drum of Normalcy
There is a timelessness to this place, a sense that favorite son William Faulkner could still walk down Van Buren Avenue toward the town square, with its whitewashed courthouse and Confederate memorial, and not be surprised by what he saw. Students...
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Movie Guide
Ratings and comments by David Sterritt and Monitor staff Staff comments reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs, sex/nudity, and profanity is compiled by the Monitor panel. STAR RATINGS...
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My Dream Lay Down a Dirt Road
It seems simple to me. This is how simple. My parents, in summer, take us three kids in the car down a long dirt road. The forest presses in with thick shade and flickering glades of light, the car dust covering lightly the blueberries along the sides....
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My Odyssey to See Kubrick's '2001'
There's one movie I refuse to watch on a TV screen - and you should, too. That film is "2001: A Space Odyssey," which begins a limited rerelease in theaters today. Never mind the wall-sized digital TV with Dolby surround sound in your living room....
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Post-Attack, Fewer Want to Face Life Alone ; Dating Services Are Up, Divorce Rates Down
Before Sept. 11, Curtis Giesen thought he had plenty of time to find someone to settle down with and start a family. But the World Trade Center attacks, which happened just a few blocks from his now off-limits apartment in Battery Park, had a profound...
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Russian Plane Crash: Terrorism or Accident? ; A Russian Plane, En Route from Israel, Crashed into the Black Sea Yesterday
A Russian chartered jet heading from Israel to Siberia exploded in flight yesterday, crashing off the Black Sea coast with a reported 77 people on board. While President Vladimir Putin initially said terrorists might be responsible, a senior US military...
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Ties That Bind: Changing Relations between US and UN
The world body began work this week on a global treaty against antiterrorism. With diplomacy crucial in the Bush administration's strategy to fight terrorism, Washington is setting aside its traditionally dim view of the United Nations and offering...
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'Training Day' Upends Buddy-Cop Formula
it's a standard movie convention: A policeman is saddled with a new partner, and the new cop's personality is the antithesis of the incumbent officer's. Disagreements initially flare up, but, by the film's end, the two are the best of friends. "Training...
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US Caught between Alarm, Calm
Even as Bush urges Americans to resume daily lives, warnings from his team underscore the need not to undersell the new risks. As the United States struggles to recover from the events of Sept. 11, Washington is facing a difficult task of national...
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'Va Savoir' Is a Treat; 'Cienaga' Doesn't Gel
what do movie fans, theater buffs, and starry-eyed romantics have in common? They're all going to love Va Savoir, the new comedy- drama by French master Jacques Rivette, now coming to theaters after opening the New York Film Festival last week. For...
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We Can Enhance Security and Preserve Rights
After Sept. 11, our nation has begun a tragically overdue reassessment of airport security. Some argue that our security needs will require us to abandon some of our most fundamental rights and liberties. But we need not choose between constitutional...
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Years of Hard Work Pay off for a Rising California Opera Star
Three years ago, when internationally known baritone Rodney Gilfry interviewed for the role of Stanley Kowalski in Andre Previn's operatic setting of Tennessee Williams's "A Streetcar Named Desire," he left nothing to chance. With a four-day beard,...
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