The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 31, 1993

Aid for the Ozone Layer
THE hue-and-cry over damage to Earth's protective ozone layer has led to a "capture."Scientists from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have recorded a marked drop at ground level in the rate of increase for two man-made chemicals...
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Americans in the Dark on Defense
RIGGED tests may have persuaded Congress to keep funding the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), but the American public believed all along that the United States already had a significant defense against a Soviet missile attack. This is the bottom line...
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A Shakespeare Makeover in Santa Cruz
Am I in earth, in heaven, or hell? Sleeping or waking? Mad or well-advised?- Antipholus, in Shakespeare's "Comedy of Errors"DESPITE the best efforts of theater marketers to keep the classics current, American audiences trying to sort out the "doths"...
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Clinton Must Rally Democrats to Pass Trade Agreement THE FALL AGENDA
PRESIDENT Clinton has returned to town to finish a task begun by George Bush.One of the most pressing matters on Mr. Clinton's fall agenda - pressing because of a Jan. 1 deadline to implement the pact - is passing the North American Free Trade Agreement...
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'Dove' Sequel Offers Action, Compassion
LARRY MCMURTRY'S new novel is not just for those who love westerns. It is for those who enjoy both action and human compassion. "Streets of Laredo" is the sequel to McMurtry's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "Lonesome Dove," which was made into a TV miniseries...
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Events
CAROLINIANS FLEE EMILY'S APPROACH Up to 100,000 people on North Carolina's barrier islands were ordered to evacuate yesterday as Hurricane Emily twisted on a path toward the southeastern United States. Gale force winds could reach North Carolina...
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Hutus, Tutsis Try Reconciliation, Easing Rwanda's Ethnic Conflict Peace Pact Allows for Greater Democracy, Refugees to Return Home
AT a time when the world is wrestling with ethnic conflagrations, the small African nation of Rwanda is attempting to resolve a decades-old rivalry involving costly tribal wars and the flight of more than 1 million refugees.Under a peace pact signed...
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Insurance Industry Seeks Reform, but Queries How Spiraling Health Care Expenses Are Due in Part to the Hefty Adminstration Costs of Insurers
THERE is a perceived "bad guy" in America's health care crisis - the health insurance industry.Hundreds of thousands of people complain of coverage dropped, prices hiked, or policies refused when needed. Doctors and hospitals bemoan the industry's morass...
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Insurers Quibble with Reform's Details
PRESIDENT Clinton may have dropped the idea of a national health insurance system, but the nation's 1,500 private insurers are still tentative about the alternatives.With annual health care costs rising at twice the rate of inflation, 37 million Americans...
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In the Towns of the Upper Volga, It's the Early 1600s All over Again Russia's Current Crises Remind Some of an Earlier, Equally Chaotic Era: The Time of Troubles
VERA IVANOVNA, a 75-year-old pensioner, gingerly puts down her rickety cart, slowly sharpens her scythe, and then begins feebly swinging the tool in the knee-high grass.Asked why she is cutting grass, she says it is part of her plan to buy a goat as...
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Israel's Gaza-Jericho Plan: A 'Breakthrough'?
THE 11th round of the Middle East peace process starts today amid developments that are not propitious for an equitable and durable settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Indeed, it is bewildering that the Arab parties, especially the Palestinians,...
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Mars Mission's Lessons
LOSS of the Mars Observer is a bitter disappointment for planetary scientists. But it's a bad rap to blame it on space agency "bungling."No one knows what has happened to the spacecraft. However, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration space...
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Mystery Trails Deaths in Brazil Initial Reports Said 73 Yanomami Were Killed by Brazilian Miners Angry over Their Expulsion from Indian Land. but Pro-Mining Lobbyists and Politicians Counter That No Massacre Occurred
THE Yanomami Indians believe that when the last Yanomami shaman dies, the world will come to an end.It must have seemed like the end of the world to 17-year-old Antonio Yanomami when he came upon the mutilated bodies of his people in the dense jungle...
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Not Ready as Perm-7 Players
PRESIDENT Clinton has announced his support of including Germany and Japan as permanent members of the UN Security Council. This initiative may appear wise. After all, the two nations have attained the status of economic superpowers. It would be difficult...
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Nurturer of Statehood and Empire Russia's History Has Been Forged for Centuries in the Volga River Valley. Today, a Journey along Its Banks Reveals the Divergent Views Shaping the 'New Russia.'
ACROSS this vast Eurasian territory, there are rivers greater in length and power, but none that has been more influential in shaping Russia's statehood than the Volga.It stretches more than 2,100 miles, originating in the Valdai Hills north of Moscow,...
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Officials Aim to Get Residents Back into Their Homes
WATERLOGGED Des Moines served as host for a two-day flood-relief conference last week. Officials gathered from nine Midwest states affected by this summer's historic flooding.Henry Cisneros, United States secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD),...
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Owner in Back Seat as Yankees Revive
NEW York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner has managed to keep a low profile almost all season long, and look where his team is - battling neck-and-neck with the Toronto Blue Jays for first place in baseball's American League East.His return to baseball,...
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Regulators Need New Rules as TV and Telephone Merge New Technologies and Alliances Change the Playing Field
THE simpler days of regulating the television and telephone industries are over. It is not just that issues are more complex. Regulators are going to have a tough time figuring out who the players are, let alone how to regulate them.Technological improvements...
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Summer of Flooding Leaves Stark Choices for Midwest States New Rains Delay Damage Assessment, Land-Use Decisions
IN small Ste. Genevieve, Mo., the flood waters of the Mississippi have receded 10 feet. "We kept the water from coming downtown," says Mayor Bill Anderson of the tenacious sandbagging effort over a four-mile-long emergency levee that held back the flood...
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Talks in Mozambique Solidify Peace Accord TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY
FIVE days of talks between Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano and former rebel leader Gen. Afonso Dhlakama have raised hopes of reviving the ailing United Nations-monitored peace process leading to Mozambique's first democratic ballot in October next...
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The Cycle of Good
TTHERE'S been a lot of news coverage lately about battered women who kill their abusers and are sent to jail. The causes for such actions are often attributed to a "cycle of abuse." But mustn't there be a way to stop these cycles of abuse before they...
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TV Ventures Signal Cracks in Mass Culture
HERE in Los Angeles, two harbingers of significant trends in American entertainment culture are in danger of passing as minor blips on a radar screen:* A fifth TV network is planned for launch by Warner Bros., the Hollywood studio owned my media giant...
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UN Denounces Rights Abuses in Kosovo
FOR the first time, the international community has officially denounced ethnic persecution in Kosovo, the once-autonomous province in Serbia that has since 1989 felt the brunt of a Serb crackdown.The UN Sub-Commission on the Prevention of Discrimination...
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When Images and Words Meet and Sing
MOONLIGHT ON THE RIVER By Deborah Kovacs. Pictures by William Shattuck Viking, 32 pp., $13.99.GRATITUDE TO OLD TEACHERS By Robert Bly. BOA Limited Editions 21 pp., $75 leatherbound $7 paper.IT'S hard to step out of my salt-water river. Walking back along...
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Women's Vietnam War Memorial Tours US on Way to Washington Dedication Will Cap Decade-Long Effort to Honor the Wartime Service of 11,000 Women Veterans
THE country's most visible testimonial to sacrifices made by the nearly 11,000 women veterans of the Vietnam War is on its way to Washington for a dedication ceremony on Veteran's Day (Nov. 11).The Vietnam Women's Memorial, created by local sculptress...
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World Court Should Take Center Stage to Settle Disputes
Increasingly persuasive arguments suggest that there is time for a new look at the International Court of Justice by nations who should know that both sides will be losers if they cannot settle their problems peacefully. It is time for the Clinton administration...
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Worth Noting on TV
* TUESDAY</P><P>Viewer Call-in (C-Span, 8-8:45 p.m.): Viewer participation in a journalists' round-table discussion. * THURSDAY</P><P>The John Larroquette Show</P><P>(NBC, 9:30-10 p.m.): He's the manager of a crummy...
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