The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 6, 1993

A Correspondent's Correspondent
FOR a journalist to write the brief history of an era is an exceedingly risky undertaking. For one thing, journalists usually have no secrets to reveal, having used their exclusives in scoops long ago. For another, journalists are professionally concerned...
Another Handshake?
IN a world that has lately witnessed a handshake between the chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Israeli prime minister, any number of impossibilities seem at least somewhat less impossible. Progress toward peace in Northern Ireland...
Cambodia: A New Government, Threat of Khmer Rouge Lingers
AS UN forces in Cambodia wind down their most ambitious peacekeeping mission in history - to demobilize Cambodian armed forces and organize free and fair elections to choose a new government - hopes that democracy and peace will prevail are mixed with...
Can the UN Be the Worlds Cop? Called on to Intervene in Civil Wars and Shepherd States toward Democracy, the Blue Helmets Are Caught between Increased Dangers and Faltering Support
WHEN the fighting gets fierce and innocent victims appear on TV screens, the world increasingly looks to the United Nations for help. Often more by default than design, UN peacekeepers have been taking on the role of world cop.The UN now operates 17...
Clinton Accentuates Nuclear Concerns
PRESIDENT Clinton's first major foreign-policy address Sept. 27, at the United Nations General Assembly in New York, outlined a nascent, pragmatic, internationalist leadership role for the United States in the post-cold-war world. His doctrine of "enlargement"...
Don't Resume A-Tests
CHINA'S underground test on Oct. 5 ended a year-long hiatus on nuclear tests among the five declared nuclear powers.Beijing's action is unfortunate. However, the remaining four - the United States, Britain, France, and Russia - should resist pressure...
Events
US RESPONDS TO CHINA'S NUCLEAR TEST China, defiantly rejecting Western pleas for a moratorium on nuclear testing, exploded its first device in a year on Oct. 5. China gave no details of the size of the device exploded underground in the province...
Finding a Separate World in the Stillness
CLOUD-WATCHING should be a required school subject. I try to recall the facts and figures poured into me as a student in a traditional public grammar school, but what I rest on in memory is the just-mowed grass of my front lawn where I'd spend hours...
Former Yugoslavia: Mission Caught in a Maelstrom
THE United Nations operation in former Yugoslavia involves 25,000 soldiers, police, and civilians from several countries. The effort is one of the UN's most problem-bound, controversial, and costly, and illustrates the difficulties the UN faces in its...
Freedom to Be God-Governed
HOW frequently nations and individuals find themselves in situations that seem hopeless, beyond their control. But there is a way to lift the burden of frustration and discouragement. There are solutions to the increasingly complex problems confronting...
From the Last Mideast War Springs a Legacy of Peace the October 1973 War Convinced the Arabs and Israelis That They Could Not Win on the Battlefield
TWENTY years after Egyptian troops stormed across the Suez Canal and routed Israeli forces at the start of the 1973 Middle East War, analysts in the region are coming to view the conflict and its torturous aftermath as the first steps along the long...
Georgia Economy Weaker with War on Two Fronts Fading Russian Trade Connections Stymie State-Owned Enterprises
ONCE a shining economic light in the old Soviet Union, the economy of Georgia continues to dim in the shadow of civil war.Rebel supporters of ousted president Zviad Gamsakhurdia seized the key port city of Poti from the government of Eduard Shevardnadze...
House Republicans Ready for Aggressive Approach as Longtime Leader Quits
PRESIDENT Clinton's task just got tougher on Capitol Hill.A new generation of Republicans is lining up to replace House minority leader Robert Michel of Illinois, who has announced he will retire in January 1995 after 38 years in Congress.Mr. Michel's...
Indonesian Chinese Take Business Expertise Back Home
THOUGH Indonesia's 7.2 million citizens of Chinese ancestry make up only 4 percent of the nation's population, they control 75 percent of the country's private assets.After a failed communist-led coup in 1965, Jakarta broke off diplomatic relations with...
Military Solution Hurts Russia's Democracy Effort Muscovites Now Worry about Costs of Victory If President's Power Is Unrestricted
IN the end, Russian democracy could only be saved by the armor and arms of the Russian Army.That bitter irony now hangs as heavily over the Russian political scene as the black clouds of smoke that billowed out of the White House, Russia's marble parliament...
Mixing Borscht with Politics Russian Immigrants in a New York Community Breathe a Communal Sigh of Relief at End of Coup
COOL wind was blowing on what the local immigrant community calls "Odessa Beach," but the maps call Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. Despite the wind, it was still warm enough for hearty Russian men to be sunbathing on the boardwalk while they played dominoes...
Networks May Lead to Social Computing
IN the chic neighborhood of Neuilly, just outside Paris, Didier Convert is busy subverting his company.It's all above board. His company - Chevron Chemical S.A. - wants him to reinvent its computer systems. It's just that in doing so, Mr. Convert is...
Reaching out and Really Seeing Things
AT first I couldn't believe my eyes. It was nighttime at our friends' cottage. Something had woken me in the wee hours, and I had glanced through the side window of the guest room. Utterly amazed, I looked again. A tree in full blossom in the month of...
Relief, Unease Mix on Moscow Streets
ALEXEI GUBIN stood near the entrance to a downtown Moscow subway station, enjoying the bright sunshine and eating a banana, a once-scarce commodity and symbol of the benefits of Russia's market transition.Mr. Gubin, an economist with the Primorsky Sakhar...
Salvador: Success Flows from `Thirst for Peace'
SECRETARY-GENERAL Boutros Boutros-Ghali has called the United Nations Observer Mission in El Salvador (ONUSAL) "a prime example of the need for a fully integrated approach to peace-building." It ranks as one of the most successful UN peacekeeping programs.It...
Scowcroft Urges US to Support Yeltsin Regime Series: THE MONITOR BREAKFASTS. Part of an Occasional Series
THE Clinton administration was right to support Russian President Boris Yeltsin in his showdown with the parliament, says retired Gen. Brent Scowcroft, who was national security adviser under President Bush."The last expression of the Russian people...
Serbian Radicals Force President Milosevic's Hand Showdown Will Steer the Course of the War in Bosnia and Croatia
SERBIAN President Slobodan Milosevic is facing a serious challenge from his own political creation, right-wing leader Vojislav Seselj, in a power struggle between the chief self-avowed defenders of Serbian national interests.A resolution could ultimately...
Somalia Crisis Turns to Quaqmire as Clinton Hardens US Resolve
PREDICTIONS that the United Nations humanitarian mission in Somalia would devolve into a drawn-out military conflict seem to be coming true, but few UN or United States officials - or Somalis themselves - know how the Americans and UN can withdraw without...
Somalia: Force Used to Stabilize Fractured Land
SOMALIA is the UN peacekeepers' first venture into peacemaking, in which troops were mandated to use force to establish a secure environment for humanitarian efforts and for rebuilding the country.The anarchy that cost some 300,000 lives through starvation...
Southern Africa: Lessons Learned from Three UN Missions Series: THE UN KEEPING THE PEACE THE WORLD OVER. Fourth of 4 Articles Appearing Today
NAMIBIA'S peaceful transition to independence in March 1990 remains one of the UN's major peacekeeping triumphs. The 9,000-strong United Nations Transitional Assistance Group (UNTAG), provided a model for UN intervention during a major transition in...
Surprise Summit Aims to Clarify Israeli, PLO Positions
ISRAELI Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman (PLO) Yasser Arafat are scheduled to meet in Cairo Oct. 6.The surprise summit hosted by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is the first encounter between two leaders since...
The Anger of Somali Families to Many, the UN Represents the outside World, Which Has Come to Their Nation and Behaved Badly
A GRAFITTO sprayed across some of the walls of Mogadishu slums reflects the anger among Somalis at the United Nations.For many people in southern Mogadishu - the fiefdom of a fugitive warlord who is wanted by the UN for human rights crimes - UN military...
The Somalia Policy
THE effort to capture Gen. Mohamed Farah Aideed in Mogadishu Oct. 4 proved the worst nightmare so far for US troops in Somalia. The US mission in that country is not only under attack by General Aideed, but by members of Congress who sense the White...
Uncertain Future for Medicare Clinton's Plan to Leave Program Intact May Yield Political Gain - and Economic Pain Series: REFORMING HEALTH CARE. Part 10 of an Occasional Series. Only Article Appearing Today
BY proposing some cuts in Medicare without changing its essential structure, the Clinton administration has managed to retain the backing of a key constituency - the elderly. But in appeasing them in the short term, some analysts worry, the administration...
US, Canada, Mexico Build University Ties
WHILE a noisy debate rages over creating the world's largest consumer market with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), university-level educators are quietly bridging borders to create the North American classroom.Among academic institutions...
US Doesn't Need to Boost Subsidies for Arms Sales Money Would Be Better Spent on Job Training and Defense Conversion
THREE years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the US military industry's response to new post-cold-war economic realities is to keep pushing old answers: an all-out effort to capture the weapons export market. And to ensure that the market remains an...
US Rethinks Russia Policy Following Yeltsin Victory
IN Washington, Boris Yeltsin's crushing victory over hard-line parliamentary foes is being received with relief - and a sense of unease about Russia's future.Officials worry that President Yeltsin's use of tank fire against civilians could carry an unavoidable...
Yeltsin's Deal with the Russian Army Could Slow Reform WHY MILITARY BACKED THE PRESIDENT
WESTERN intelligence experts believe President Boris Yeltsin has struck a bargain with leaders of the Russian armed forces that will diminish his authority and multiply the problems he faces in the wake of Sunday's failed coup.The experts' concerns are...