The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 3, 2008

After War, Russia's Influence Expands
Boris Samoyev, a driver from war-torn South Ossetian capital of Tskhinvali, pulls his car over to allow a convoy of Russian military trucks to roll past. The trucks are heading south into the Roki Tunnel, which connects the republics of North and South...
Ahead at Supreme Court: Big Cases, No Blockbusters
The new term at the US Supreme Court is a little like a vegetarian buffet, plenty of interesting items but nothing really meaty. At least not yet. A legal dispute over religious monuments in public parks, whether senior US officials can be sued for alleged...
AIDS Orphan Copes without His Sister
All it took was an unfounded charge of child abuse and Celina Seloma's world turned upside down. Her small foster family became one child smaller. In May 2007 - just weeks after the Monitor visited the Selomas' home and their 5-year-old foster son, Gift,...
An Uncertain Future for the Sons of Iraq
Fresh concern is washing over Iraq of a new wave of insurgent violence as the bands of mainly Sunni Muslim Iraqis trained, armed, and paid by the US military to fight Al Qaeda in Iraq are now coming under the control of a skeptical Shiite-led government....
A Picturesque Garden in the Azores
Old gardens possess a grace impossible to bestow through artistry alone. The velvety patina of moss in the cracks of concrete and stone; the calm inhabiting the space beneath old trees; high-flying branches shaped by decades of wind - these cannot be...
Ballot-Box Gamble
Again this election cycle, citizens will decide whether to introduce or expand casino-style gambling in their states. Casino resorts in Maine and Ohio? Slot machines - 15,000 of them - in Maryland? Round-the-clock gambling in Colorado? Backers promise...
Books about New Architecture and Design That Stretch the Imagination
REVOLVING ARCHITECTURE: A HISTORY OF BUILDINGS THAT ROTATE, SWIVEL, AND PIVOT by Chad Randl (Princeton Architectural Press) If architecture inevitably invites expanding our perspectives of ourselves and the world, the concept of buildings offering 360-...
Brazil's Worst Logger: The Government?
Brazil's environment minister announced yet another series of measures to halt deforestation of the Amazon this week, but their impact was weakened not only by the fact that destruction had increased sharply once again but that the government itself...
Can We Save Forests by Listening to Trees?
An old Broadway song laments, "I talk to the trees, but they don't listen to me." Now researchers are finding it pays to let the trees "talk" to them.Humans have lived with trees for millennia. Yet two recent studies reveal that we still have a lot to...
Crisis Rippling into Economy
Brace yourself. The credit squeeze that almost every financial expert has warned about is here. Banks are reducing credit lines and refusing to make new loans to everyone from the local used-car dealer to the office-supply store. Unable to float bonds,...
Dare I Believe Obama Can Win?
Like so many Americans, I feel as though I am holding my breath. Could the quiet seed of joy that was planted in my heart the day I heard Barack Obama speak for the first time take root and grow without fear of the brutal storms of disappointment? Could...
Eleventh-Hour Prayer
It's never too late to pray. Never too late to expect God's love to change our lives for the better. Prayer is a dynamic agent of healing at any time, no matter how threatening the challenges we're facing. Consider the many biblical accounts in which...
Fans of the USA, and Other Notes from the 'Phile' Files
A reader inquires: Is there a special term for fans of America and its people and culture - something analogous to Anglophile to refer to admirers of England (please pass the clotted cream) or Francophile for admirers of France? The short answer: no,...
Fund the Fight against Global Poverty
There is too much at stake for the United States to allow millions worldwide to continue living in extreme poverty. Sens. John McCain and Barack Obama both made this clear at the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting last week. Alleviating poverty,...
Heat Up That Iron: A Guide to Ecofriendly Clothing Care
Even if a person's closet doesn't contain a single item made of organic or recycled fabric, she can still help the environment - without heading to the store.That's because "more energy goes into caring for and cleaning a garment than [making] it," says...
India Nuclear Deal: Big Step but Long Road
Senate passage of a civilian nuclear deal with India Wednesday may allow the Bush administration to go out of office touting at least one feather in its nonproliferation cap. But on two other prickly issues - Iran and North Korea - President Bush will...
In Georgia, Refugees Wait for Promised US Aid
Maria Davitashvili lives in an office in a defunct printing building, sharing the space with her brother and his wife and two children. Their homes were burned during Georgia's brief but disastrous war with Russia and South Ossetian separatists in August....
Karsh's Art - Iconic Yet Intimate
Before there were paparazzi, there was Yousuf Karsh (1908-2002), the eminent Canadian photographer who specialized in portraits of world luminaries, or "the good, the great, and the gifted," as an Australian exhibition of his work was titled. More than...
Letters to the Editor
Replace the SAT with a group of short exams Regarding the Sept. 30 editorial, "Shelve the S.A.T.?": On the one hand, it claims that "students spend too much time and money on the SAT and the ACT." On the other, that "the tests protect against grade inflation...
Nations Eye India's Vast Nuclear Market
With an emphatic vote Wednesday, the US Senate assured that America will take part in India's $100 billion nuclear-energy sweepstakes. The 86-to-13 vote to resume civilian nuclear trade with India for the first time since 1974 is a signature diplomatic...
One Hockey Mom's Rinkside Regimen - and Views of Sarah Palin
When Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin burst onto the political scene as John McCain's running mate, it was probably fitting that the self- proclaimed hockey mom's acceptance speech was made inside a hockey arena in Minnesota. The Republican convention was held...
One Month Later, Has Chrome's Polish Lasted?
To judge from the thousands of articles that followed Google's release of its Web browser, Chrome, one thing was clear: A browser war is on. But now that a month has passed, average users could be excused for wondering what all this buzz was about, and...
Reporters on the Job
* Sensitive Topic: The focus for Part 2 of staff writer Scott Baldauf's occasional series on South Africa's AIDS orphans - teen sexuality - is a sensitive one, but it came from a long conversation Scott had with foster parent Olga Thimbela (see story)....
Review: 'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist'
Teen comedies will be greatly diminished when Michael Cera grows out of them. His ability to seem both lightweight and impassioned makes him the perfect uberadolescent. His presence did much to cauterize the raunchier passages in "Superbad," and he was...
Review: 'Rachel Getting Married'
If a movie's merit were linked to the likability of its main character, "Rachel Getting Married" would rate a zero. Anne Hathaway's Kym, whose sister Rachel (Rosemarie DeWitt) is indeed getting married, is like a human Brillo pad. Recently out of rehab,...
Six Picks: Recommendations from the Monitor Staff
A lyrical election primer In between watching Saturday morning cartoons in the 1970s and '80s, kids learned about United States history - courtesy of Schoolhouse Rock and its catchy tunes and lyrics. Disney's Election Collection DVD has classics such...
The Challenge of Raising Teens in AIDS-Ravaged South Africa
On the way home from school, Thabang Thimbela stops off to visit his girlfriend, a few blocks from the tin shack where he and his foster parents and seven foster brothers and sisters live. The teenager has never told his foster parents, Olga Thimbela...
The Heretic's Daughter
If you live in Salem, Mass., chances are good your ears are burning right now. Not since the heyday of Nathaniel Hawthorne (or possibly Stephen King) has the town attracted so much fictional attention.First up was this summer's bestselling debut "The...
The White/nonwhite Divide
THE SOUTH AFRICAN photographer Mikhael Subotzky aims his lens at subjects most would avoid. In his exhibition, "Beaufort West" at the Museum of Modern Art through Jan. 5, the 27-year-old focuses on conditions of deprivation and desperation, opening our...
When Milk Arrived on the Doorstep
The comedian Jerry Seinfeld has a short, hilarious monologue about the panic that ensues when families realize they're out of milk, or that their milk is past its expiration date. He hits the nail right on the head. In my home, "milk awareness" is also...
Why Canada's Green Party Is (Finally) a Prime-Time Draw
One way or another, Canada's Green Party leader Elizabeth May will make history this week.The mother, lawyer, environmental activist, and native of Connecticut will be the first Green Party member to participate in national televised debates on equal...