The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 11, 1989

Artists Get a Break from Businesses
FEW people believe that it pays to be an artist. But a variety of services are offered free or at discounted prices to visual and performing artists, including accounting, consulting, legal advice, materials, housing, medical treatment - even personal...
`As the Gentle Rain from Heaven'
`THE quality of mercy is not strain'd; / It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven / Upon the place beneath," Portia declares in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. And she says, "It is an attribute to God himself."1How much we need this quality in...
Chicago's Daley Takes Center Stage. WINDY CITY POLITICS. New Mayor Defeats Opponents in a `Quieter' Campaign That Was Full of Voting Surprises; CORRECTION
WHEN Richard M. Daley won Chicago's mayoral post this week, he inherited a city on the brink of change.On the surface, the political landscape seems as fractious and divided as ever. Blacks supported three separate candidates. Hispanic leaders in rival...
Landscape as a Living Presence. House Made of Wind
Always the rush of wind.Even when the trees close by are stilled,I hear the wind tunneling through the woods,gathering force until the tree topssend up their green spumeand the forest opens its pageslike a sacred book. I learn the solidityof light, a...
Multinationals and Hazardous Wastes
CRITICISM of international trade in hazardous waste escalated into shouts of "toxic terrorism" last summer. The international outcry led to several United Nations gatherings, with the most recent one in March resulting in 34 nations signing a treaty...
Nomads in a Dwindling Rain Forest. PENAN OF SARAWAK
THE Penan of Sarawak, nomadic jungle dwellers of Borneo's rain forest, have qualities that set them apart from other indigenous groups on this largest island in Southeast Asia.They are quiet and attentive; they are gentle and smile back at strangers....
Rebirth of Maoism in China. Modern-Day Strains Spark Yearning for Mao-Style Puritanism
"Mao Zedong was fine, a dime was worth a dime.Deng Xiaoping may be okay, but a dollar's worth a dime today." -Popular Chinese sayingWHEN local officials decided to remove a statue of Mao Zedong from a public square in the northeastern town of Dandong...
Sellars Mini-Opera Staging Passes a Test. MUSIC: REVIEW
YOU never know where director Peter Sellars will pop up next.Just when it seems the West Coast has become his permanent base - he's in charge of the Los Angeles Festival and teaches at UCLA - his name is being mentioned in connection with a possible...
Sweet Life amid Honey and Hives
A BOOK OF BEESby Sue Hubbell, New York: Random House, 193 pp., $17.95BEES, you think, those nasty, buzzing creatures that sting. But Sue Hubbell, a commercial beekeeper, can almost make you love the rascals. She nurtures 12 million of them on her 100-acre...
Tanker Industry Mulls Changes after Oil Spill
Last month's Alaskan oil spill, the worst such disaster in national history, highlights the tough choices facing the US tanker industry as it upgrades an aging fleet and finds ways to prevent similar accidents.The average age of an oil tanker in the...
Tart Corporate Boss Talks of Ethics
IN talking about the "ethical slide" in the United States in the last 10 years or so, Rand Araskog turns a neat phrase."Activities that were considered to be in the gutter are now up on the sidewalks in America," he states.The chairman of ITT Corporation...
The Legacy of Katyn Forest. Polish Regime Shows New Assertiveness with Soviets by Admission on Katyn Massacre
THE tragedy occurred 4 decades ago, and, by the standards of World War II, it wasn't particularly grisly: Some 4,500 people lost their lives.But to most Poles, the murder of Polish officers at the forest of Katyn near the Soviet city of Smolensk still...
Tons of Toxic Chemicals Above
`2.4 BILLION Pounds of Toxic Chemicals Poured into Air," recent headlines read. After two decades of major pollution-control efforts and hundreds of billions of dollars spent on reducing discharges, people are shocked to learn that the quantities of...
Treasures from the Fitzwilliam Begin US Tour. British Museum's Director Chats about Works of Special Interest to Americans
HENRY JAFFE, a gray-bearded man in a brown suit, stands in the center of a room full of "Treasures From the Fitzwilliam Museum" and tries to decide which will mean most to American viewers. He's entitled. Mr. Jaffe is director of the Fitzwilliam, considered...
Wildlife Oasis Needs Protection. Urban Development and Pollution Threaten New Jersey's Great Swamp Refuge. ENVIRONMENT: ENDANGERED REFUGE
ONLY 26 miles west of the hurly-burly of New York's Times Square, suburbia's shopping malls and parking lots give way to nearly 7,000 acres of swamp woodland, cattail marsh, and grassland.Nestled in a shallow basin ringed by flat-topped ridges, the Great...
Yoko Ono's '60S Art Revisited
WERE the 1960s as scintillating, artistically speaking, as they're often claimed to have been? That question keeps coming to mind as I attend the show called "Yoko Ono: Objects, Films." It's on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art here (through...