The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 16, 1990

34-Nation Summit to Signal End of Continent's East-West Division FRAMING A NEW EUROPE
SUNDAY evening, the heads of 35 nations of Europe and North America begin what some are billing as the peace conference that marks the end of the cold war division of Europe into East and West.This is only the second summit meeting in the 18-year history...
A Book about Books British Booker Prize Goes to a Spellbinding Literary Detective Story
THE winner of England's most prestigious literary prize is "Possession," by A. S. Byatt. It's a Shakespearean detective story loaded with 1,700 lines of verse - pretty good verse, too. This improbably buoyant novel combines Shakespearean romance (chaste...
A Study in Black and White Wildly Differing Styles of Chess and Politics Season the Current World Championship Match
IT'S the ultimate pressure cooker: the two greatest chess players of our time locked in a grim, silent battle of wits and wills for the world championship one or the other has held since 1975.Night after night, hour after hour, titleholder Garry Kasparov...
Big-City Mayors Cry out for Help Urban Social Ills from Crime to Homelessness Deserve Top-Priority Status in Washington, They Say. SUMMIT IN NEW YORK
THE nation's big-city mayors are in a bind. They are beset by growing social problems from homelessness to drugs that have already prompted many businesses and residents to escape to the suburbs. To try to resolve the problems through higher local taxes...
Debate near the Brink
THE impulse for war with Iraq, which has begun to seem irresistible, is being checked somewhat by members of Congress.The White House may be doubling the number of troops in Saudi Arabia. But what Republicans Richard Lugar and Bob Dole, and Democrats...
Did Strontium Do in the Dinosaurs?
RESEARCHERS at the University of Washington here say they have turned up new evidence that challenges the leading notions of how the dinosaurs became extinct.The death of clams about 1 million to 2 million years before the large reptiles disappeared...
Election's Clear Message, Unclear Results
THE 1990 campaign and its ballot conclusions Nov. 6 provided dramatic evidence of voter dissatisfaction and, what's more, made clear its source. At the same time, they reminded us again of the properties of the contemporary parties and elections system,...
Estimates of Panamanian Casualties Not a Secret
Regarding the opinion-page column "What's the Truth on Panama Casualties?," Oct. 16: There has been no attempt on the part of the US government to hide the reporting of Panamanian fatalities as a result of Operation Just Cause. Also, there is no basis...
Europe, US Vie on Farm Trade Standoff Threatens World Trade Agreement
UNITED States and European trade negotiators are exchanging visits this week in an attempt to salvage the endangered eighth round of discussions on regulating world commerce.The so-called Uruguay Round of discussions under the Geneva-based General Agreement...
Gulf Crisis Eases Iran-Iraq Rivalry Western Troop Buildup in Region Prompts Old Foes to Pursue Common Interests
IN the lobby of the luxurious Rashid Hotel, an Iraqi journalist presses for an interview with Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati. It is the first visit to Baghdad by a senior Iranian official in a decade. A member of the Iranian delegation patiently...
Heseltine Fights Thatcher for Party Leadership Conservatives Are Increasingly Uneasy over British Prime Minister's Tactics and Policies
MARGARET THATCHER has begun a battle for her political life.By next Tuesday, when a first ballot is cast in a contest for her party's leadership, Mrs. Thatcher will know whether or not her 11-year term as Britain's prime minister is over.Even if she...
Holy Ground and Conflict Resolution
HOW tragic when holy ground, which should be a focal point for spiritual aspirations, becomes instead a flash point for conflict. News reports tell of nonbelievers threatening, even desecrating, another faith's holy ground. They tell of religions fighting...
Indian Politics: End of Secularism?
MAHATMA GANDHI used populism to fight for Indian independence. He embodied a formidable mix of inner strength, moral stature, and political acumen that often left the British rulers confounded. He rallied the masses and fought against religious divisions....
Knight on the D Train to Brooklyn
WHEN I was a boy, my father entered the knighthood. He is not a man of high birth, and our holdings did not even extend to our apartment in Flatbush, which was rented. His steed was usually the D train, and he did most of his jousting with his boss.But...
More UN Clout on Environment
OVER the 1990s, the real threats to our future will increasingly be recognized as environmental. Public awareness is already mounting. Polling done this year by Americans Talk Security found that 74 percent of the American public identified environmental...
News Currents
CRISIS IN THE GULF</P><P>US Defense Secretary Richard Cheney Wednesday called for an additional 72,500 US military reservists to support the growing American force in the Gulf. The move raises to 125,000 the number of Army, Navy, Air Force...
No Recession Yet, Says One Economist
MICHAEL KERAN says he's not ready "to throw in the towel yet" on a recession.The chief economist for the Prudential Insurance Company of America is decidedly in the minority among economic forecasters. Blue Chip Economic Indicators, based in Sedona,...
Oil Bows to Beauty in Santa Barbara Environment Concerns Upstage Gulf Crisis
DESPITE growing concern about domestic energy supplies, there is little movement toward tapping one of the last big energy frontiers of the United States - offshore oil.To the delight of environmentalists and the chagrin of the oil industry, the crisis...
Peru Aims to Win Coca Farmers over to Crop Substitution Program Fujimori Policy Gives Peasants Access to Credit to Aid Conversion
PERU'S decision to coordinate its antidrug efforts more closely with the United States comes hard on the heels of an address last month by new Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori, in which he elaborated his antidrugs "doctrine."The establishment of a...
Punishing the Parent for Child's Misdeeds
IF law-enforcement officials have their way, jail cells in Chicago and other cities may soon accommodate a new breed of "criminals" - parents doing time for their children's crimes.After a 15-year-old boy in Chicago missed 80 days of school last year...
Small Works Can Make a Big Impact Abstract Impressionist Show Honors Once-Slighted Artists Who Didn't Produce Large Canvases
THE exhibition `Abstract Expressionism: Other Dimensions," currently at the Whitney Museum's Park Avenue branch, proves two things. First, that the movement made famous by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and a few others, was not necessarily...
Speaking out Soviets Who Once Complained Secretly around the Kitchen Table or in Private Letters to the Kremlin Are Going Public with Their Gripes Series: SOVIET SOJOURN. Part 9 of a Series
WHEN it came to speaking one's mind, Russians used to fit in two categories.There were those who would air their complaints only in the company of trusted friends in the privacy of the kitchen. Then there were those who would risk all and deliver a letter...
Talk, Talk, Talk Radio
EVERYONE possessed of erudition should aspire to elevating the public culture, but will find it a frustrating effort. It has long been my desire to remove "you-know" from the bright lexicon of America, and my recent effort has been rebuffed. I wrote...
The Appeal of Bigotry
THE assassination of Meir Kahane brings on mixed emotions for most Americans familiar with his career. First of all, many acknowledge the tragedy of taking any human life, particularly for political purposes; it is yet another unfortunate manifestation...
The Noriega Tapes
IN United States legal doctrine, under which most rights and interests are "weighed" and "balanced" against competing rights and interests, few rights are inviolable. But one protection that has been very nearly untouchable is the press's right against...
US-Peru Relations Warm as AntiDrug Plans Begin to Mesh
AFTER a rocky start, relations between the United States and Peru's new government - dominated by the drug issue - appear to be getting back on track.The two countries have set up a working group in Lima, the Peruvian capital, to come up with a joint...
Wider Questions Arise from S&L Ethics Case CAPITOL HILL
THERE'S far more than meets the eye to the Senate hearings that opened this week into the propriety of the activities of five senators in connection with the difficulty savings and loan owner Charles Keating had with federal regulators.What at first...