The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 15, 1995

All Wet on Wetlands
THE motives behind the current revision of the Clean Water Act surfaced unmistakably last week when the House of Representatives passed its bill despite a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report that exposed the shakiness of one of its key provisions,...
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A Yankee Independent Governs Maine
ANGUS KING has an unenviable job.As governor of Maine, he has the standard worries of budgets and services. As a politician, he must promise Mainers a better economic future and stable taxes, just as the state's dominant industries of fishing, logging,...
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Brotherhood of Serbs Falters for Croatia's Rebels Serbs in Croatia, Bosnia Can No Longer Expect That Their 'Homeland' Will Come to Rescue When They Are Threatened
THE sense of shock is palpable. From the president down to homemakers, stunned Serbs are struggling to rationalize their worst military defeat since World War II and come to grips with a disturbing new feeling -- vulnerability."This has been a great...
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Bush and the NRA
GEORGE BUSH'S resignation from the National Rifle Association should stun other gun owners and hunters into examining the direction that the NRA has taken recently.Mr. Bush strongly objected to a description of federal law-enforcement agents as "jackbooted...
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Carrying the Future on One Strong Arm
SHEATHED in a shirt sleeve, my left arm looks unremarkable, though the biceps might appear a bit chubby. A friend who plays tennis and is built like a wire coat hanger reached over for a playful pinch one day, but drew back his hand back in surprise."What...
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China Vexed by US Push for a 'Shield' against Nukes
IT'S a scenario to catch the eye of any Chinese military planner.Sometime in the future, China gets into a dispute with an Asian neighbor, such as Japan, but finds the threat of its nuclear weapons made useless by a missile-defense system -- designed...
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Deft Actors Keep 'Crimson Tide' Afloat Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington Vie for the Helm When Remnants of the Cold War Resurface
LIKE many politicians, Hollywood has been discombobulated by the end of the cold war, which provided a set of social and political certainties that allowed filmmakers to bypass original thought where international intrigue was concerned. Not surprisingly,...
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Does Defense Industry Really Need 'Welfare'? Eliminating 'Recoupment' Fees on Arms Sold Abroad Could Cost US Treasury Hundreds of Millions
WHEN a defense contractor wins a contract to produce a weapon for Uncle Sam, American taxpayers pay for all the research, development, and production costs. When the company exports the weapon, it thus makes a handsome profit. Uncle Sam charges the contractor...
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Emerging Markets Tempt Investors Risks and Rewards Can Be Considerable for Developing-Country Mutual Funds Series: YOUR MONEY
DESPITE a stormy period, emerging-market mutual funds continue to sprout like spring flowers.Last month, both T. Rowe Price, in Baltimore, Md., and the Calvert Group, in Bethesda, Md., offered funds invested in emerging markets -- that is, in stocks...
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Fight Oppression in Burma by Refusing to Do Business
THROUGH their investments, PepsiCo Inc., Texaco Inc., and Unocal Corporation are supporting a despicable regime whose violations of human rights are among the most egregious in the world.Burma (also called Myanmar) is controlled by a military dictatorship...
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Glitter Meets Grunge as Hollywood Stars Descend on Seattle
YOU could chalk it up to "Northern Exposure," the boom of Seattle "grunge" rock music, or even the proverbial livability factor.But more likely, it comes down to money.Seattle is playing host to Hollywood productions at an increasing rate. This spring,...
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It's All a Song and Dance
ALTHOUGH I am a liberal Democrat, I find much to admire in the Republicans' Contract With America. For starters, it has been a public relations bonanza. Perhaps the Democrats can create their own Contract. I have come up with several bills that they...
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Japan's Investments in US Lose Jewel-Like Lustre
JAPANESE investors are learning the hard way that owning United States real estate is not a quick path to fortune.The latest example is Mitsubishi -- majority-owner of the Rockefeller Center complex here, which filed for bankruptcy protection last week.The...
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Jerusalem Land Seizure Jostles Israel-PLO Pact
THE faltering Israel-PLO peace process is under threat as criticism has mounted over Israel's decision two weeks ago to seize 133 acres of mainly Arab-owned land in East Jerusalem for Jewish housing and a police station.Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak...
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Just Don't Park Your Lincoln Anywhere near This Cattle Drive
IT'S 20 minutes past sunset out on the Oklahoma prairie, and the herd is grazing peacefully in a pasture. The cowboys, weary from the day's ride, lie in their bedrolls by the fire. As if on cue, the lonesome wail of a harmonica fills the night.But this...
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Lawn Mowers and the Likeness between Father and Son
When Barbara and I bought our first house, a friend at work pulled me aside to give me some advice. I thought he was going to tell me to go for an adjustable-rate mortgage or to make the smallest down payment possible, but instead he told me: "Whatever...
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National Trust Tries to Stay Behind the Times Britain's Century-Old Preservation Group Must Balance Maintaining the Past and Sustaining a Future
How can a place of natural beauty be preserved without turning it -- and the people who live and work in it -- into some kind of museum?This is one of the questions that exercises John Young. Mr. Young was appointed rural affairs adviser to Britain's...
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Now the Fight over the Right Budget Balance GOP Defends Plan to Cut 372 Agencies
SCHOOL loans would get slashed. Amtrak might have a rough ride. The Voice of America could fall silent, and as for the Commerce Department -- well, it might go kaput.Republican budget-cut plans now forging ahead in Congress would remake the face of the...
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Religion Comes First in the Bill of Rights New Book Offers Legal Principles for the Judiciary in Securing Religious Liberty and Freedom of Conscience
SECURING RELIGIOUS LIBERTY: PRINCIPLES FOR JUDICIAL INTERPRETATION OF THE RELIGION CLAUSESBy Jesse ChoperUniversity of Chicago Press 198 pp., $24.95RELIGIOUS liberty is a very popular idea in the abstract. It is only when you apply the idea to specific...
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Rio Grande Water Shortage Hits Both Sides of Border
A TEXAS water official focuses his binoculars on the "secret" pumps on the opposite banks of the Rio Grande, watching powerlessly as they suck a steady torrent into a Mexican irrigation canal.Ruben Quintanilla says Mexican farmers are taking water that...
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Science and Health: A Gift by the Sea Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
ONE summer I was invited to join two families at a beach cottage. I found myself spending more and more of my vacation in the company of a young lady who shared my enthusiasm for the Bible. She laughingly proclaimed she was one of those who believed...
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Small Missouri Town Reclaims Its Downtown -- and Its Pride Clarksville's Success Earns It a National Trust for Historic Preservation Award
Tiny Clarksville, Mo., has a population of 480, one four-way stop, and no traffic light. This old-fashioned river town 80 miles north of St. Louis hugs the Mississippi River to its east and is hemmed in by rolling hills on the west.Not long ago, most...
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Study Finds Electric-Car Batteries Are Possible Pollutants
Electric cars may not be the green panacea they are billed as and may themselves cause pollution, adding toxic lead from their batteries to the environment.Unless alternative batteries are developed, the cars may cause serious threats to public health...
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Violence Pushes Japan to Dig for More Order
ON April 7, Hideo Murai earnestly explained why he belonged to the Japanese sect Aum Shinri Kyo. The group is at the center of a police investigation into the March 20 nerve-gas attack in the Tokyo subway system.Saying that Aum's founder had acquired...
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