The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 9, 1995

Americans Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement
AMERICANS are still not saving enough for retirement.Since the 1970s, net private savings have dropped from about 5.5 percent of gross domestic product to about 3.5 percent. That lags well behind the savings rate of other industrialized countries: Germans...
Argentine Classic Heroizes the Gaucho
DON SEGUNDO SOMBRABy Ricardo GuiraldesTranslated byPatricia Owen SteinerUniversity of Pittsburgh Press, 302 pp.,$49.95As with many highly regarded literary works, the characterization of a subculture mixes enough truth with myth so that critics can disagree...
Atlanta Residents Fight Back against 'Greedy' Landlords
DAN BOLING pays $475 a month for his small one-bedroom apartment in Virginia-Highland, a trendy and eclectic Atlanta neighborhood. But next summer, when the Olympics come to town, he will have to shell out $3,000 a month.The Olympic-sized rental increase...
Bosnia War Shakes Muslim World Many Countries Send Aid; Radicals Try to Blame the West
WHEN 40,000 employees of the Palestinian self-ruled administration looked at their monthly pay stubs last week, they found 1 percent of their salaries had been donated to Bosnian Muslims.In Jordan recently, a telethon raised $6 million for the Bosnians....
Bourgeois Muscovites Hear Roar of the Road
TO read the level of prosperity in this town these days, watch the road. Call it the Zhiguli Index - the accelerating number of cars on Russian streets.Muscovites detest the traffic, recalling the quieter days when Moscow's broad boulevards were sparsely...
Communicating Joy Wordlessly
'Auntie," as she was called, spoke no English. I spoke no Chinese. She was a rarity in my neighborhood of Indianapolis. The ethnic community in this city is not large, but it's growing.She was the housekeeper for a family of four and had come to the...
'Confessions' by Activist Harry Wu Point Only to Beijing's Insecurity
IT took us a little while to be certain that the man we were watching on the videotape was indeed Harry Wu, the brisk and smiling figure who had worked in our editing rooms on a few prizewinning reports for the British Broadcasting Corporation last year....
Croatia's Offensive
THE Croatian military advances of the past few days have reshaped, yet again, the Balkan political landscape. The chances of continuing, and maybe intensified, warfare remain. But new prospects for settlement have opened, too, and they should be vigorously...
Croats and Serbs Brace for Border Showdown
TOMO DINCIR was watching a solemn funeral procession for one of the 118 Croatian soldiers killed in the country's weekend offensive to take back the Serb-held Krajina.After it passed along the banks of the Sava River, Mr. Dincir - a World War II veteran...
Devotion to Parents
THE loyalty and devotion to parents often considered the duty of children, has played a central role in many cultures. Perhaps the Chinese culture has been most closely identified with this tradition of filial piety. And yet, in the People's Republic...
Drop in Alcohol Consumption Shrinks Dollars Spent on Ads Consumer Groups Want More Restrictions on Ads Aimed at Young Adults
FAR fewer beer and wine commercials are airing on American television these days.Industry analysts and consumer groups attribute this to the fact that people are drinking less, particularly 18- to 30-year-olds (the group that traditionally drinks the...
For Japanese Family, No Touch of Bitterness at Memorial Ceremonies for the Bombing, Motoko Sakama and Loved Ones Recall Succeeding Occasions of American Thoughtfulness. LOOKING BACK AT HIROSHIMA
I should say at the outset that Motoko Sakama is my landlady.Shortly after I moved into the top half of the 60-year-old Western-style house that Mrs. Sakama owns in Tokyo, she and her husband invited me downstairs to dinner. Over a gracious and friendly...
Glasgow to Honor Its Native Son, Architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh A Major Touring Exhibition in 1996 Marks New Assessment of His Vital Role
Fifteen years ago, interest in turn-of-the-century Glasgow architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh had the feeling of coterie: a specialist enthusiasm.He was given due textbook honors as one of the pioneers of the modern movement (historian Nikolaus Pevsner...
Heeding Its Islamic Roots, Secular Turkey Builds Ties to Balkans
MORE than a century after losing control of Bosnia, Turkey is seeking a stronger role in the war-torn country.Public opinion here has been highly critical of Turkey's inaction on Bosnia. As a legacy of three centuries of Ottoman rule, 3 million people...
Lawmakers Clash over 'Family Caps' Senate Welfare Reformers Debate How to Curb Growing Problem of Out-of-Wedlock Births
BY one estimate, 50 percent of all births in the United States will be out of wedlock by 2003.Can federal welfare policy be shaped to curb the trend?That question is a focal point of the debate in the Senate this week as lawmakers take up changes to...
Maverick Marketeers in Ukraine Keep Quiet Booming Shadow Economy Is Even Bigger Than Russia's
WHEN the Ukrainian government banned the use of foreign currency in retail sales Aug. 1, most of the affected supermarkets closed briefly to add five zeros to their price tags. They now show prices in Ukrainian karbovanets instead of dollars.But the...
Prisoner of War Learns to Forgive, Reconciles with His Interrogator Author Tortured in World War II Tells of His Journey to a Genuine Tie with Former Enemy
'Sometime the hating has to stop." This is the final sentence of "The Railway Man," by Eric Lomax. The preceding narrative is a detailed account, by a Scottish septuagenarian with a sharp memory, of his torture during World War II - and of his recent,...
Six Artists Share Same 'School' but Little Else Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon Are Exhibited among 'Herd of Differing Loners' from London
THE "School of London" is not really a school. It is simply a label that appears to have become firmly attached to a number of artists who have, since about 1940, spent long periods, if not entire careers, working in the British capital. Like most art...
Small, Specialized Publishers Fill Book-Translation Niche Lack of Readership, Financial Concerns Turn Large Publishers Away
Pushed to the corners of American bookstores by brightly colored displays for popular home-grown novels, books in translation have been moved to less conspicuous locations for one simple reason."Translations are unprofitable," says Ashbel Green, an editor...
The Holes in Mexico's Bucket
US decisionmakers, both in Washington and Mexico City, continue to make wrong, questionable - and occasionally correct - judgments about Mexico.For example, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R) of New York says that "there is no chance whatsoever" Mexico will pay...
The News in Brief
The USThe two-pronged congressional investigation into the Whitewater scandal continued yesterday. Jean Lewis, senior criminal investigator with the Kansas City office of the Resolution Trust Corp., told the House banking committee that Clinton administration...
The United Nations' Mission Impossible Warring Sides Must Agree to Intervention
BECAUSE there is no peace, conventional wisdom holds that the United Nations has failed in Bosnia as it failed in Somalia. Neither UN action, however, was designed to establish or maintain peace: The UN's mission in both places was to facilitate and...
Trying Teens as Adults: Not Always Hard Time Studies Show Criminal Courts Often Give Lighter Sentences
A GROWING number of states, eager to curb juvenile crime, are trying young offenders as adults. One reason: to ensure they receive harsh enough punishment.But do teens tried in the adult system actually serve more time?Not in many cases, statistics show,...
Vietnam's Follow-Up
ON his historic visit to Hanoi, US Secretary of State Warren Christopher answered a journalist's question about China. Was the US, the reporter asked, trying to contain Chinese ambitions through dealings with one of Beijing's regional rivals? Mr. Christopher...
Who Feeds at Farm Subsidy Trough? Federal Dollars Go to Marching Bands and Nonprofit Foundations
WHEN you think of federal agricultural subsidies, images of corn farmers in Iowa or Kansas wheat growers probably spring to mind.But those federal dollars also find their way into the budgets of state public schools and universities. Unlike ordinary...
Why US Tobacco Subsidies Endure A Connecticut Yankee's Views on Support-Free Tobacco Farming
HIS forearms darkened by a muddy mixture of sweat and soil, Ed Kasheta rubs a hatchet blade with his thumb and apologizes for getting angry. But he makes his point anyway."The government has no business being on the farm," he says, taking a few minutes...