The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 19, 1997

A Hint of Infinity Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
A friend told me about living in a large city where trees were scarce. She missed the countryside. At the beginning and end of each long city block there was a lone tree-just one.But my friend had learned that it is important to be grateful, and she...
Cabinet Reshuffle Deals Reform Card in Kremlin
The latest sign that President Boris Yeltsin is suddenly serious again about reforming the Russian economy - after three years of drift and distraction - is Boris Nemtsov.The mop-headed, high-energy, young governor of the province surrounding Nizhny...
China: A Future Aggressor in Asia? New Book Causes Stir over Diplomatic Strategies for 21st Century
The Coming conflict with chinaBy Richard Bernstein and Ross H. MunroAlfred A. Knopf 245 pp., $23 With the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the cold war, numerous "soothsayers" have emerged in the United States predicting the state of world affairs...
Clinton Handicaps Himself on Dealing with China
The emerging power of China will be President Clinton's toughest foreign policy problem during his second presidential term.The administration confronts this problem with a number of handicaps.First is the imbroglio over Chinese involvement in Mr. Clinton's...
Easing India and Pakistan toward the Table to Help Defuse Possible Nuclear Conflict in South Asia, Employ Subtle Persuasion, Appreciating the Parties' Own Initiatives
The new foreign policy team in Washington is hardly going to put South Asia at the top of its agenda, but it has already taken note of the possibility for change in that key region. And it understands that a reduction of tensions there is very much in...
Feds Claim Progress in Fight against Illegal Gun Trafficking GUN DEALERSHIPS DROP
Despite the widespread perception that America's streets are brimming with guns as never before, federal law-enforcement agents are making quiet progress in a four-year effort to keep firearms out of the hands of criminals.Since President Clinton signed...
Hard Times Befall the US Tax Collector
Taxpayers who fret over the possibility of an IRS audit may find some consolation in the fact that this year the taxman is looking over his own shoulder.Discontent with the Internal Revenue Service has reached a crescendo in Washington, and some officials...
Is 'Lion King' a Symbol of a Brave New Zaire?
Zairean rebel leader Laurent Kabila may not have won his war yet, but he has already given himself a parade. The rebel capital, Goma, came to a standstill March 18 as thousands of people crammed the streets to watch the rebels celebrate the weekend capture...
Many Seek American Dream - outside America Whether the Reason Is Business, Family Ties, or a Better Lifestyle, Leaving the US Is Getting Popular
What do Americans want?Safe streets, good schools, friendly neighbors, rewarding work.And where are many Americans finding them? In Canada, New Zealand, Mexico, Israel, Taiwan, and a growing list of other countries that are attracting record numbers...
More Taxes, Fewer Benefits - and Fewer Votes? A Controversial Proposal Would Change the Yardstick for Inflation - Good News for the Budget and the US Economy. but It Would Squeeze Many Pocketbooks
Imagine the political firestorm if Congress cut Social Security pensions an average $2,148 per couple over five years.Or if Congress soaked taxpayers an extra $1,600 by 2006.Yet the White House and congressional Republicans are considering just that:...
Nairobi Street Children Abused by Law Officers
Joseph Mwangi and his teenage friends are terrified of being arrested by the police. Their crime: being homeless on the streets of the Kenyan capital, Nairobi. Mostly they are picked up in ones and twos, but occasionally, there is a full-scale swoop....
Seattle Plugs into GameWorks VIRTUAL ARCADE
GameWorks executives chose to debut their high-tech video arcade in Seattle because it would create a bigger splash here than in Los Angeles or New York. But they didn't bargain on actually getting wet.On March 15, the afternoon rain fell like steel...
Sky Lights: Lunar Wink, Cosmic Candle, and Mars
The grizzled wizards of yore who peeped and muttered might have peered at the night skies this week and thrown fits.With a comet growing brighter in the predawn and early evening skies, a lunar eclipse due this weekend, and Mars at its biggest and brightest,...
Summit Surprises
It's a comeback kid meets Bill Clinton summit. There's no other way to characterize the reversal of fortune that finds supposedly out-of-it Boris Yeltsin riding the momentum of his dramatic young-reformer government into Helsinki while the erstwhile...
The King's Mission of Healing
March 1997 will go down in history as a memorable month in Israel-Jordan relations. First, an acrid exchange of letters between King Hussein and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Then the murder of seven Israeli schoolgirls on a bit of Jordanian...
The News in Brief
The USPresident Clinton now faces the task of choosing a new candidate for CIA director after Anthony Lake withdrew his nomination. The former National Security Council head called the Senate Intelligence Committee hearings "mired in partisan politics"...
To Curb Vancouver's Big Trade in Child Sex, Police Nab 'Johns' Arrest of Customers May Encourage Girls to Testify in Court
After trying nearly everything to curb the rising number of children in Vancouver's notorious sex trade, political leaders and police say the only thing left is to throw the book at customers.Since January, Vancouver police have been hauling in both...
Truth Shock Awaits North Korean Defectors Even Ex-Ideologue Hwang May Find South a Difficult Eye-Opener
South Korea will soon welcome the highest-ranking official to defect from North Korea. Hwang Jang-yop, chief ideologue of the North's communist system, is expected to reveal the inside scoop on one of the world's most closed societies.After that, he...
Western Australia's Treetop Balancing Act Conservationists Are Challenging the State's Effort to Increase Tourism in the Valley of Giants, an Ancient Forest
Walking through this enchanting, lush forest misted with a gently falling rain conjures up the sensation that one has been swept away into an Alice in Wonderland fantasy.Wide, tall trees loom overhead in the still forest, called the Valley of the Giants,...
Why Senate Roughs Up Some Cabinet Nominees
Anthony Lake thinks it's his former Senate interrogators who should be on trial - not himself.In withdrawing his nomination to be director of Central Intelligence, the president's ex-national security adviser is criticizing the Senate confirmation process...
Why This Week's Summit Is Important to Clinton and Yeltsin Washington Currents
This week's Helsinki summit between Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin will be a meeting of two politically troubled national leaders.The stakes underlying the two-day conclave loom large: peace for Europe's 507 million people, safety for the 100,000 US...
Zaire after Mobutu
The regime of Mobutu Sese Seko has been rotten and teetering for years. For three decades, Zaire's great natural wealth has been squandered for the dictator's personal gain. Its economic infrastructure, and the economic well-being of all but a tiny elite,...