The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 9, 1998

Americans Tune out Spoilsports Big Games Are on TV This Week, but Ratings Show That Old Sports Loyalties Are Strained
Sports fans, get ready for overload.It's a traffic jam on the airwaves this week. There's mayhem on the ice for hockey's Stanley Cup finals, Michael Jordan flying for a six-pack of basketball championships, and national pride at stake in France for soccer's...
Are You a Know-It-All? Museums Want You
Need an expert on pre-Columbian art? Feel an urge to talk in depth about the presidency of Jefferson Davis? Or the childhood of Ernest Hemingway? Got questions about the difference between diesel and steam engines, or the way the Industrial Revolution...
At One Texas School, Wired Is a Way of Life
James Apel and Jose Castellon are giving an unusual tour of the Institute for Texas Cultures in San Antonio. Unusual, because they are sitting in front of a computer at their high school in Austin."The museum asked us to create an interactive Web site...
A Wake-Up for the CIA
Official alarm in Washington over the failure of US intelligence to predict India's May 11 nuclear test led Director of Central Intelligence George Tenet to request an inquiry. Adm. David Jeremiah, former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was...
Brave Sleuth for Truth in Jakarta Indonesia Riots
They noticed the grenade after lunch.It lay just inside the courtyard, a tiny space crammed with boxes, cars, volunteers on break, and two warbling songbirds in cages.The Rev. Sandyawan Sumardi, who runs the Jakarta Social Institute, an advocacy group...
Church Meeting Emphasizes Healing Christian Scientists Told of 'A Great Religious Awakening' Now under Way in the World
The night before US Army Chaplain Janet Yarlott Horton left Germany last year to deliver an Easter sunrise service in Tuzla, Bosnia, her cat suddenly leapt from her arms and left deep claw wounds on her lips and chin.As a Christian Scientist, Colonel...
Colombia Human Rights Join Drugs on US Radar Screen
The routine for a decade or so was that human rights advocates denounced the Colombian military in the US press, the military denounced the human rights advocates in the local press, and Washington took no notice.So it must have come as a surprise to...
Costs of the Coming Road Boom Clinton Is Signing the Biggest Road-Building Bill in History. but Local Smog Problems May Hold Back the Tar and Concrete
President Clinton is set to sign a transportation bill today that will put almost as much money into road building as the gross domestic product of Egypt - $162 billion.Indeed, Mr. Clinton's signature will set off a Pyramid-sized construction boom that...
Goldwater's Nonpartisan Brand of Honesty
'Mr. Republican" is a misnomer. So is "Mr. Conservative." Barry Goldwater was really "Mr. Call It As It Is and Let the Chips Fall Where They May." But that's too long. Just make it "Mr. Integrity."I traveled with Mr. Goldwater all along the campaign...
Hope and Help Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
June 9 is a day many remember as Thanksgiving during World War II. From May 26 to June 4, 1940, an event took place that was referred to as a miracle of deliverance. Allied soldiers, virtual sitting ducks trapped in the small French city of Dunkirk,...
Justices Take Up Limits of Privilege Does Attorney-Client Confidentiality Remain after Death? Ruling Will Affect Starr Probe
Nine days before Vince Foster committed suicide, he spoke in confidence with his attorney. Three pages of handwritten notes came out of that meeting - notes that Whitewater investigator Kenneth Starr subpoenaed two years ago. If Mr. Foster were still...
Learning French While Dancing? Students Make the Leap with Panache
It's 9 a.m., and two Bennington College students, Sasha Cuccinciello and Margaret Eisenberg, begin walking across a room, their arms carving imaginary waves, heads bobbing. Suddenly they flop to the floor, "swimming" (crawling) on their bellies.As...
Lessons on Laptops Boot Them Up or Boot Them Out?
Oswaldo Pancho lives with his mother and sister in a cramped low- income housing project in upper Manhattan. They rely on welfare checks and food stamps. His mother hopes he will work his way out of poverty, although she has her doubts.But last November,...
Letters
Charter Schools: Designed by CommunityI was distressed to see "Arizona's Big Stakes in Charter Schools" (June 2), an article about charter schools that managed to perpetuate so many of the myths that have surrounded charters since their inception.The...
Procrastination 101: Blame It on the Computer
All right, if there's one major thing I've learned in college, it's how to waste time. I don't just mean the kind of amateur stalling that I practiced in high school. No, this is the big league here. I was officially awarded my black belt in procrastination...
Recognizing 'Inspired and Selfless Service'
Growing up in inner-city Oakland, Calif., Karen Chan recalls all too well the sobering number of friends who became pregnant, turned to drugs, joined gangs - or were shot.The environment can yield a desperate, violent existence, the sort that might...
Serbian Aggression - Again Carrots Extended, It's Time to Get Serious about the Sanction Stick
Slobodan Milosevic has once again thumbed his nose at the international community and now threatens to spark yet another conflict in the Balkans.After beginning a series of talks designed to resolve peacefully the brewing rebellion in Kosovo, the Serbian...
Students Shine on Stage, and a School Reaps Benefits
On the southern side of Puerto Rico, also known as La Isla del Encanto or Island of Charm, is a town called Pueblo del Cafe. It has a school theater project, El Mundo Creativo (Creative World), that aspires to strengthen students' self-esteem. Some youths...
Tell Us Your Favorite Book
We're on the prowl for a few good books for kids.Say what you want about today's generations of nonreaders and computer geeks. Rant if you must about TV's mind-numbing influence. And forget about the parents who complain each year that required summer...
The Big Apple Food Fight New Effort to Clear the Streets of Manhattan Creates Controversy
What could be so bad about New York City pretzels, Italian sausages, and good old-fashioned hot dogs in a bun? New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani says quite a lot.As part of his Quality-of-Life campaign, the Republican mayor has ordered street vendors who...
The News in Brief
The USThe US used nerve gas during the Vietnam War, targeting American defectors and others, CNN and Time magazine said. Adm. Thomas Moorer, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reportedly confirmed that sarin nerve gas was used in 1970 in a...
Tied Up
Geoffrey Budworth knew he wanted to tie knots when he was 11 years old. As a Sea Scout (like the Boy Scouts) on England's south coast, he had learned a few basic knots. But then he saw a decoratively knotted bell rope one day and was "smitten," he says.A...
Yen Slips, Japan Frets It Hit a 7-Year Low against Dollar Yesterday. That's Good for Toyota Buyers in the US, but May Be Bad for Asia's Economic Recovery
How the mighty yen has fallen - and keeps falling.The Japanese currency fell yesterday to a seven-year low against the American dollar. One dollar bought 140.73 yen, a hefty increase from the 112 yen it bought a year ago.The yen's slide produces more...