The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 22, 1994

After Domestic Wins, Will Clinton Tackle Foreign Policy?
TREASURY Secretary Lloyd Bentsen was in a contemplative mood the other morning at breakfast. He said that with the economy growing steadily stronger he had the "easiest" job in government.This is a far different Bentsen from the one who appeared at a...
Balanced Budgets
THE United States Constitution was never intended to be the vehicle for setting national economic policy. Yet it is being nudged in that direction: Today, the US Senate is set to debate the latest version of a balanced-budget amendment. If it musters...
Business and the Law
IN economics, laissez faire is the term for business competition unhampered by government regulation or side-taking. It's an economic vision favored by many (and rhetorically by most) businesspeople.A lot of businesspeople will tell you they want a more...
Clinton Would Bottle Up Use of Chlorine
CHLORINE is a ubiquitous feature of everyday life. It cleans drinking water and swimming pools. It makes paper white. It is a key element in the production of most pharmaceuticals. It helps banish "ring around the collar." And it features in the manufacture...
Companies Squeeze Legal Fees Even the Most Elite Law Firms That Serve Fortune 500 Companies Are Being Forced to Become More Efficient Series: BUSINESS GOES TO COURT. to Cut Costs and High Fees, Companies Aggressively Manage Their Legal Work. Part 5 of a 5-Part Series. First of 3 Articles Appearing Today
WHETHER they got mad or just determined, company lawyers decided a few years ago that they weren't going to take it any more.Caught between rising legal expenses and cost-cutting demands by senior management, many in-house corporate lawyers began challenging...
Dealing with Dolly
JANE MANNING, the narrator of Anita Brookner's latest novel, "Dolly," is a pale, thoughtful, rather reserved young woman who writes children's books. Dolly is her aunt by marriage: an alien and exotic presence who strikes her young niece as "a generic...
East Europe Watches NATO's Handling of Bosnia Ultimatum SECURITY IS THE THING
EASTERN European nations are keenly watching how NATO handles the Sarajevo crisis for insights into the alliance's determination to maintain stability in Europe.As the Bosnian government looks to NATO to impose a truce on the war-torn Balkan nation,...
Environmental Equity
The article "N.Y. State Accused of Environmental Racism for Incinerator site," Feb. 8, regarding the closing of an Albany, N.Y., power plant concerns a serious issue. Polluting industrial facilities have been forced in many instances on poor and minority...
Events
N. KOREA WARNS ON NUCLEAR ACCORD North Korea said yesterday it will back out of its agreement to allow inspections of its nuclear facilities if the international community tries to expand the scope of the inspections. The strongly worded statement...
Flying through the Barriers of Prejudice
THERE is a lot of talk in the newspapers these days about the military, how many soldiers are needed, and what types of defense - ground, sea, or air - are most effective. But during World War II, such questions could be answered with one word: more!As...
Forced out of Their Homes in Croatia Sometimes the Croatian Helsinki Committee Can Stop the Outrage - Sometimes It Can't
AS much of the world prepared for the holiday season in late 1993, stark terror entered the lives of a woman and her daughters in Split, Croatia. Bursting into their apartment, several armed and uniformed persons demanded that they relinquish their home...
From One Grande Dame to Another, a Tribute Tony-Winner Irene Worth Plays Pulitzer-Winner Edith Wharton
THE minutely observed novels of Edith Wharton (1862-1937) make the past so palpable, their author is often called the first social historian in American literature. The rustle of greenbacks and sighs of thwarted lovers are almost audible in the New York...
Gardening Senses
Rosemary Verey is not content to think just about how a garden looks. The influential British gardener says plants should be appreciated with all five senses.Her talk at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show held here recently was titled "Color Through...
Help from the Bible (Written Especially for Young People)
I WAS attending a Christian Science Sunday School. Each Sunday the teacher would have us memorize different verses from the Bible. But she wanted us to do more than just know the right words. She wanted us to understand what they meant and to make...
How Ethical Are Lawyers about Hours They Bill? Series: BUSINESS GOES TO COURT. to Cut Costs and High Fees, Companies Aggressively Manage Their Legal Work. Part 5 of a 5-Part Series. Second of Three Articles Appearing Today
DO lawyers cheat on their bills?"Until recently, dishonest billing by attorneys was the ethical violation that dared not speak its name," William Ross of the Cumberland School of Law, Samford University in Birmingham, Ala., wrote last year in the Journal...
Iraq Asks Iran to Return Aircraft
AN Iranian newspaper reported yesterday that Iraq sought to persuade Iran at talks in Tehran last week to return planes flown there secretly before and during the 1991 Gulf war. The English-language Tehran Times quoted informed sources as saying that...
Jewish Settlers Protest Killing of Israeli Woman
HUNDREDS of Jewish settlers blocked West Bank roads with rocks and burning tires yesterday morning, stopping Palestinians from going to work, as a protest against the killing of a settler woman on Feb. 18.Tzipora Sasson died when Palestinian gunmen ambushed...
Kick Habit of Gambling Revenue, Says Bay State Clergy
MASSACHUSETTS clergy are speaking out strongly against state-sponsored gambling.Last week, more than 100 Protestant leaders descended on the State House to urge lawmakers to oppose revenue-raising initiatives proposed by Gov. William Weld (R), who wants...
Leave RICO's Civil Side Intact
Let's be cautious about narrowing the scope of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), as the editorial "High Court and RICO," Jan. 28, suggests Congress consider doing.Although RICO has become a favorite target of American business...
Leave RICO's Civil Side Intact
Let's be cautious about narrowing the scope of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), as the editorial "High Court and RICO," Jan. 28, suggests Congress consider doing.Although RICO has become a favorite target of American business...
Liberty Mutual Initiative Aims at Reining in Rising Litigation Costs Series: BUSINESS GOES TO COURT. to Cut Costs and High Fees, Companies Aggressively Manage Their Legal Work. Part 5 of a 5-Part Series. Third of 3 Articles Appearing Today
IN late 1992, executives at Liberty Mutual Insurance Group in Boston found that the company had paid more than 3,000 outside legal-services providers (law firms or individual attorneys) to represent the company or its policyholders in claims litigation...
Mass Remedies for Mass Torts
ONE of the unfortunate byproducts of modern life, with all its "miracles of science," is the presence of toxins and other hidden dangers that can silently wreak damage on people (and the environment).These dangers have given rise to something previously...
Names Worth Knowing
February is Black History Month, and it's a good time to learn about influential black Americans. But if you want to read about all of them, you'll have to go to an encyclopedia, because there's not enough room in this newspaper!Here are just a few...
NATO, UN Poised for Next Steps Airstrikes Still Option; Tactics Considered for Other Enclaves
IN a voice redolent of regret, Gen. Stanislav Galic, the commander of the Bosnian Serb hold on Sarajevo, considered how things stood."If the United Nations and other sides had not meddled, I would have sorted out Sarajevo," the hard-faced officer mused...
Public Seeks Sense of Purpose in US Bosnia Policy Approval for Airstrikes Rose When Need Was Explained
THE recent NATO ultimatum to the Bosnian Serbs to withdraw their heavy artillery from Sarajevo or face airstrikes received overwhelming support from the American public.A poll taken Feb. 9-13 by the Program on International Policy Attitudes at the University...
Replacing Riot Police, Army Brings New Calm to S. African Townships
THE bleak wasteland that separates these two strife-torn townships - a deserted road flanked with rows of abandoned and vandalized houses - is now a venue for soccer matches between township youths and soldiers."It would have been unimaginable to see...
Rostenkowski on the Run in Key Illinois Primary Powerful Congressman Could Lose If Voters Focus on Allegations
REP. Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois has defeated some tough opponents in 18 straight congressional elections, but next month he faces a ballot against perhaps his hardest adversary ever: himself.Throughout the campaign for the March 15 Democratic primary,...
Schools Are Pressed to Teach Creationism, Scientists Say
AMERICAN classrooms have become the battleground for a renewed attack on the teaching of evolution, with the religious right pressuring schools, especially in the Midwest, Northwest, and California, scientists say.At a scientific forum on "Anti-science,...
Scientists Get Squeezed by Clinton Budget Defense Research Slows Down after Cold War While Budget Caps Constrict Civilian Side
THERE are tougher times ahead for American scientists.Presidential science advisor John Gibbons warns "there is no new money out there" for science and technology in the administration's 1995 budget request. If any programs get favored treatment, there's...
Seattle Celebrates Early Spring - Indoors the Northwest Flower and Garden Show - Third Largest in the United States - Attracts 81,000 Winter-Weary Visitors
THE Northwest Flower and Garden Show is only six years old, but it already draws the third-most visitors of any flower show in North America.The five-day show here, which closed Feb. 13, drew a paid attendance of 81,000. Only Philadelphia and Boston...
South Africa's National Treasure Enriches Hearers Ladysmith Black Mambazo Winds Down Tour
THEY clap, stomp, shimmy, dance, wave their arms, and often act out songs with gestures and facial expressions. They are 10 men whose voices blend into rich harmonies that are joyful and sorrow-filled, spiritual and penetrating.They are Ladysmith Black...
There's Much Confusion as Brady Law Kicks In
THE Brady Law's five-day waiting period for handgun purchases takes effect in a week, and confusion abounds among gun dealers and law-enforcement officials preparing for paperwork and background checks.Even the federal official in charge of implementing...
Tropical Sledders Make the Grade Bobsledders Bring Assets of Jamaica's Running and Pushcart-Racing Traditions to the Sport
WHEN the Jamaican bobsled team appeared at its first Winter Olympics in 1988 in Calgary, Alberta, the group was viewed as a bunch of misplaced Caribbeans. Their whimsical novelty act would surely disappear with the spring thaw, not soon to return.But...
US, New Zealand Mend Ties despite Differences since 1987, the Two Faced off over Wellington's Nuclear-Free Policies
ANOTHER remnant of the cold war has quietly fallen.On Feb. 19, United States Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced that Washington would restore the high-level ties with New Zealand that have been cut since 1987.The announcement follows a review...
Washington Sees Black and White in Effort to End Red Ink
A "ZERO" budget deficit. Voters say they want it. Most congressmen say they support it. But can the United States really lower its $235 billion deficit to zero by the end of this decade?Washington is gripped by that question as debate gets under way...
Worth Noting on TV
* TUESDAY</P><P>Saddam's Latest War: A Commentary by Michael Wood (PBS, 10-11 p.m.): Writer-narrator Wood has brought a refreshingly literate tone to several public-TV series in the past few years - including "River Journeys" and "In Search...