The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 1, 1995

A Game of Ice and Granite Adds Gold Curling Is Very Popular in Canada, Where the Sport's Genteel Nature May Be Threatened by Its New Olympic Status and Sponsorship Deals
A NEW sporting controversy is heating up ice rinks in Canada. It's not about professional hockey, but over that strangest of ice sports -- curling, where a fast broom and well-thrown hunk of granite are keys to victory.Every sport has its defining moments,...
Agents Want 'Fair Share' of US Airline Fares Trade Group Claims 50,000 Jobs Could Be Lost; Analysts Say 'No Way'
THESE are grim days for travel agents.Faced with sharply lower commissions from most United States airlines since February, travel agents say their industry may lose tens of thousands of jobs and start charging customers for once-free services.But by...
A Liberating Flood of Letters
WHEN Bruce, a soft-spoken economist, and I met in 1988, I don't think either of us knew why we had come to the Detroit-area Amnesty International meeting. I think we both just felt the need to do something to help others. Why we didn't volunteer our...
All Talk, Few Results Leave S. African Lawmakers Defensive ANALYSIS
IN the new South African Parliament, former black liberation fighters have packed away their camouflage fatigues and have adapted quickly to the role of be-suited parliamentarians debating legislature.White rightwingers have settled down, too. Gen. Constand...
A New Role for Unions?
A MANAGEMENT tool used by 80 percent of the 1,000 largest companies in America is being threatened by a movement representing only 12 percent of private-sector workers.A dozen times since 1992, the National Labor Relations Board has held that "employee...
Armory Show Puts Major Works under One Roof, Ready to Sell
If you had a few million dollars in your pocket, the Art Show at the Seventh Regiment Armory in Manhattan was certainly the place to be. The five-day annual event, which ended Feb. 27, is one of the premier dealers' shows in the country.There you could...
Canadian Budget Cuts Deeply but Proves Popular
IN one fell swoop, Canada sacrificed a truckload of sacred cows, gave pink slips to 45,000 civil servants, challenged Quebec separatists, and took a giant step toward firming up its credibility on world financial markets.In short, Canada's annual federal-budget...
China Furls Pirate Flag
NOW the question becomes, will China stick to its side of the bargain?The trade deal struck this week between Beijing and Washington could become a milestone in the move toward a global economy with foundations in fairness and order. It concerned some...
Clinton Proposes A Brave New Banking World
PICTURE the financial-services world of the 21st century:Money from your account at Fleet Bank-Merrill Lynch, is used to buy life insurance.Beg your pardon? A commercial bank linked with a big-name stock broker that sells insurance?Current law forbids...
Computer-Theft Cases Show Holes in Internet Companies Eager to Use On-Line Computer Services Fret over Security
JUST as the Internet prepares for an onslaught of new users, computer experts are uncovering serious security breaches in the network.In the past few weeks alone:*A federally funded computer security unit here at Carnegie Mellon University sent an advisory...
High Court Hears Case That May Reset Church-State Line
A CLUTTERED grotto beneath Peabody Hall on this venerable college campus seems an unlikely place to spawn a church-state fracas. Yet when the University of Virginia denied an evangelical magazine funds to join other student publications produced in this...
In Battle for Britain, Politicians Scramble to Be Best at Bland NOT LIKE NEWT
IN the United States, power-seekers are trying to conquer the political right because -- as House Speaker Newt Gingrich and other Republicans well know -- that is where public sentiment is moving.But on this side of the Atlantic, party leaders, conservative...
In Russia, Don't Tie US Aid to Privatization
AS the bombs fall indiscriminately on Chechnya, some members of Congress are asking the right question for the wrong reasons.Yes, the wisdom of continuing aid to the Yeltsin regime should be questioned, but not only because of violations of human rights...
Latest Advice for Many Refugees: If You Can't Go Home, Settle Down
A TEAM of European scholars is proposing a novel approach to helping some of the world's refugees.The idea, as laid out by the Swiss Academy for Development (SAD), is that refugees with little chance of ever returning to their homeland be integrated...
Lessons from Somalia
THE United Nations' exit from Somalia closes a sad chapter in the early history of the post-cold-war world.When the operation began in 1992, the United States and other participants had a certain flush of confidence. The "new world order" was being built.Somalia...
Mild-Mannered Alexander Wants to Rabbit-Punch D.C
AFTER more than 8,000 miles of traversing the country in his red Ford Explorer, talking and listening, after nearly two years running monthly "Republican Neighborhood Meetings" by satellite hookup, Lamar Alexander is ready.A mild Tennessee Republican...
NASA Set to Launch Ultraviolet Telescopes to Study the Universe
KESTRELS seek their prey with the help of ultraviolet light. Bees use it to find flowers. But when astronomers want to see the universe that way, they have to take their instruments into space.That's what they will be doing when space shuttle Endeavour...
Nothing Owed to a History of Error! Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
IN the church to which I belong, we regularly sing that well-known hymn "The King of Love my Shepherd is" (Christian Science Hymnal, No. 330). I particularly love the verse that says,Perverse and foolish oft I strayed,But yet in love He sought me,And...
Over Here: Europe Tries to Keep Attention of US Series: Gen. Shalikashvili (L.), Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Gen. Naumann (Red Beret), His German Counterpart, Salute during a Welcome Ceremony in Bonn on Nov. 7. MICHAEL URBAN/REUTERS
THE event in the Moltke Room of the German Defense Ministry was low-key and received relatively little media attention. But it could mark the start of a new age of transatlantic cooperation.At the ceremony, defense officials from the United States, Germany,...
Powerful Portrayals of Human Struggle Two Strong Movies from New Zealand and Macedonia Land Squarely on the World Cinema Map
Lands far from Hollywood are sending films to American theaters, and while the movies vary in quality -- as art, as entertainment, and as statements on contemporary issues -- their presence allows a refreshing change from commercial cinema as usual."Once...
Promoting Peace with Paper and Glue
'MAN is like the elephant that allows a small mahout to sit on its back and train it," says V. Balu. "He has forgotten his own strength."The strength this mild-mannered Indian artist is referring to, however, is not that of the pachyderm's physical might....
Refugees without a Refuge: US Starts to Pull Up Drawbridge Asylum Seekers Receive a Cold Shoulder with the Rise of Anti-Immigrant Mood
TWO years ago, Farhia's house was bombed after her husband, a United Nations employee, ran afoul of Somalia's most powerful warlord. Fearing that her life was in danger, she fled to the United States and applied for asylum.After being held for six months...
Russia, N. Korea Irk US in Nuclear Plant Deals GOP May Cut Moscow Aid If Iran Gets Reactors
FALLOUT from a pair of nuclear deals has dimmed the Clinton administration's hopes of putting relations with two crucial nations on an even keel.In recent weeks, North Korea has balked at the terms of its October 1994 accord that would terminate its...
Sarajevo Residents Cling to Refuge of Moviegoing
The ticket office has sandbags stacked against the windows to stop snipers' bullets. The makeshift theater is in the basement of an apartment building 300 yards from the front line. The films themselves are low-quality video copies with garbled soundtracks.Welcome...
The New South Africa Rocks with Mick and Keith
AFTER decades of cultural isolation under apartheid, South Africans finally got some satisfaction -- the Rolling Stones came to town.At Johannesburg's Ellis Park stadium Feb. 24 and 25, tens of thousands of rock-starved fans danced at the most extravagant...
The Stop and Go of START Politics Treaty to Reduce Nuclear Weapons Moving Ahead in US Senate, but Russian Duma Is Balking
THE stakes are extraordinarily high as the United States Senate and Russian Duma prepare to launch debate on the START II treaty.In the coming weeks, the two bodies will decide whether to ratify an agreement that would substantially reduce US and Russian...
Will Congress Remain a Patron of Science? If Democrats and Republicans Engage in a Budget-Cutting Competition, Research Will Be the Loser, Says a Prize-Winning Physicist
IN December, the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) approved a proposal to build a particle accelerator known as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Physicists hope this machine will help them understand the most fundamental laws of nature. In...