The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 19, 1991

An Appreciation of Gorbachev
A MAN stands briefly on the stage of history. From a childhood during his country's Terror, he was recruited to manage the system of Terror, and emerged not quite a hero, but at least a seemingly sincere reformer. And finally, as has happened to reformers...
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Appeals Court Ruling Allows US to Return Haitian Refugees
A FEDERAL appeals court gave the government approval Tuesday to resume forced repatriation of Haitian refugees but a federal judge in Miami ordered that no Haitians be returned until a Friday hearing.The three-judge panel of the 11th United States Circuit...
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A Rocky Start for Private Farming Russian Plans to Reverse 50 Years of Collective Agriculture Have Yet to Sink Roots on the Farm. with Youth Fleeing to the Cities and an Aging Agricultural Population Reluctant to Take on the Risks of Private Farming, the Mind-Set of Waiting for Directives Persists
AFTER 60 miles of deep birch forest, the road southeast from Moscow crosses the Oka river, rises over a crest and divides. The trucks laden with steel rods and machinery continue south toward Voronez and Rostov-on-Don.The other fork turns east into a...
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Bank Customers Face New Burdens
THE banking industry's financial problems are also proving to be a pain in the pocketbook for their customers.Even as many banks work out problems in their real estate loan portfolios, legislation passed by Congress last month will mean further costs...
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Europeans Tighten Political Ranks
WHAT started as the European Coal and Steel Community in 1951 is 40 years later on the threshold of a new path returning Europe to its place of international economic and political preeminence.The way is now clearly marked, most analysts and officials...
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Gathering around the '90S Hearth People Were Riveted to Their TV Sets during Major Events This Year
PERHAPS never before have so many news events unfolded before so many eyes in raw, unedited form as they did in 1991.The furrowed brow of CNN correspondent Charles Jaco formed symbolic bookends to a year of dramatic live television news:* January 1991....
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How to Remember What Broadcast TV Is Really About
IT'S reassuring to know that some TV viewers bring a critical eye - let's even say a cynical one - to bear on the medium. Networks tend to think of us as a collective mental sponge soaking up signals, direct and implicit, that flow through prime-time...
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IRS Cracks Down on Foreign Firms
FACING gargantuan budget deficits and antitax sentiment on the part of American voters, the United States government is stepping up its taxation of foreign-owned corporations as a seemingly painless way to raise billions of dollars in federal tax revenues.By...
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Joshua's Baked Apples
This recipe was created by Joshua DeGroot, pastry chef at Michela's in Cambridge, Mass. It's a good gourmet dessert for kids and adults to do together. 8 Cortland apples, cored (save cores) FILLING: 1/2 cup brown sugar Zest of one lemon 1/8 teaspoon...
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Keeping College Doors Open
THE Department of Education proposal to prohibit colleges that receive federal money from giving out scholarships on the basis of race should not, in theory, stop black students from getting aid.The new rules proposed by Secretary of Education Lamar...
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Moscow Days of Lines and Literature
UNTIL the days of glasnost, most American scholars and students working or studying in the Soviet Union lived in dormitories or hotels. Edwina J. Cruise, a professor of Russian at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Mass., is a veteran of many stays...
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NASA Plans 9 Launches, with Varied Passenger List BUSY SPACE SHUTTLE
ALTHOUGH the National Aeronautics and Space Administration may not have planned it that way, its manifest of nine space shuttle missions for 1992 reads like a salute to the Columbus 500th anniversary year.Not only does it have a strong international...
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News Currents
UNITED STATES</P><P>President Bush is considering a one-time, election-year tax rebate of up to $300 for each taxpayer next year. The White House, reacting to polls showing a severe drop in the president's approval rating, has abandoned...
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Quayle's Council Worries Congress the Council on Competitiveness Is Coming under Fire for Accountability, Conflict of Interest. POWER STRUGGLES OVER REGULATIONS
FROM a cluttered suite of offices across a driveway from the West Wing of the White House, Vice President Dan Quayle's Council on Competitiveness has emerged as one of the most aggressive policy shops in the Bush administration.It is drawing increasing...
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Restoration as the Solution to Disappearing Wetlands
The column "Wading in the Wetlands Morass," Dec. 6, detailing two outstanding examples of cooperative wetlands restoration, was inspiring and much needed in this age of combativeness between industrialists and environmentalists.We can only hope it was...
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Revamping of US Nuclear Arms Strategy Has Begun Anticipating Much Smaller Atomic Arsenal in Future, Energy Department Plans Production, Manpower Cuts
WHILE the world watches the ex-Soviet Union transform into a new commonwealth, the United States is quietly making big changes in something that now seems a cold-war anachronism: nuclear weapons planning and strategy.This week the Department of Energy...
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Russia Defines New Security Policy Seeks to Be Sole Nuclear Power in Former Union, but Plans Downscaling of Nuclear Capacity
A DRAFT security treaty for the new Commonwealth of Independent States will eventually leave Russia the sole nuclear power in the former Soviet Union, says a senior Russian defense official.However the treaty seeks to reassure Russia's neighbors, and...
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Sexual Harassment: Healing Ignorance
SEXUAL harassment is being discussed on television, radio, at business lunches, and across family dinner tables. The ignorance at the root of this issue is more than the often quoted phrase "Men just don't get it. The underlying ignorance really has...
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South African Talks Mark End of White Rule despite Boycotts, Constitutional Session Is First National Convention to Include All Races
ON the eve of South Africa's first full political negotiations, the major parties have agreed on a set of principles that will underpin the country's first nonracial constitution."I think you can say that exclusive white rule ends tomorrow {Friday} and...
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South Africa's Transfer of Power
SOUTH Africans tomorrow begin talking hard about the shape and governance of their country's future. For the first time in 340 years, blacks and whites will together attempt to decide constitutional principles and how to achieve a nonracial, harmonious...
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South Korea Disavows Nuclear Weapons
PRESIDENT Roh Tae-woo declared yesterday that South Korea was free of nuclear weapons and urged North Korea to join in making the peninsula a nuclear-free zone."As I speak, there do not exist any nuclear weapons whatsoever anywhere in the Republic of...
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Swan Song for Dallas Times Herald Editor Roy Bode Discusses the Challenges That Swamped His Newspaper, and That Face Other City Dailies
SIDE-BY-SIDE newspaper vending machines at the corner of Griffin and Pacific told it all: In one box, copies of the Dallas Morning News declared "Last Times Herald goes fast." The other box, the Times Herald's, contained nothing.That was Dec. 10, the...
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The Photographer's Eye: Personal Views and Visions
AS "point and shoot" cameras, mini-videocams, and computer-image manipulation permeate the world scene, photographers must ever more prove that talent is not the same as serendipity and remind us that pictures capture personal vision. Photographs are...
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The White House after Sununu New Chief of Staff Skinner Needs to Replace Top-Down, Imperious Management
GIVE President George Bush an for picking Secretary of Transportation Samuel K. Skinner, a well-regarded politician and a proven manager, as his new chief of staff. Yet, the chief-of-staff position, as it did with John Sununu, can undermine the presidency...
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UN and the Mideast
THE United Nations broke free of a hobble this week by revoking its 1975 resolution equating Zionism with racism. That resolution attempted to impugn Israel's legitimacy, but only succeeded in excluding the UN from any effective role in the search for...
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US Poised for New Telecommunications Era Phone Companies, Cable TV Rush to Be First with Visionary Ideas to Transmit Information
IF the decade of the 1980s belonged to the personal computer, then the 1990s surely belong to telecommunications.The telltale signs are there: applications from new entrepreneurs, a bewildering number of communications methods, and huge corporations...
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Welcoming Kids into the Kitchen
IT'S 11 a.m. at Michela's restaurant, where 17 parents and 20 children have gathered for some Saturday-morning fun. But this group is not here for table talk and ordinary holiday cheer: They came to cook.Donning white aprons, the tall and the small scuttle...
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