The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 2, 1994

A War-Shattered City Digs into Its Past Archaeologists in Beirut Discover Ruins over 8,000 Years Old as a City Reconstruction Plan Gets under Way
THE news from Beirut today is not about bombs and bullets.In fact, the news is more than 8,000 years old. The city, it has been learned for the first time, did exist in Phoenician days.This is one of the secrets already yielded up by the heart of old...
`Beginning of a Beautiful ...' on the Shores of North Africa, Arabs and Jews Forge New Ties from Maghreb to Mesopotamia
IN the shadow of Islam's tallest shrine, Israel stretched the chord that has bound it to the Western economic sphere for decades and reached out to the Arab world.The Hassan II Mosque is a sentinel structure in Casablanca, perching like a ship on the...
Candle in the Dark
THE town of Bled, Slovenia, on the Austrian border, is hardly a world or even regional crossroads. But under United Nations auspices, Bled hosted a remarkable gathering Oct. 28-30 of diverse thinkers who have not given up the belief that "there is a...
China Loses Its Passion for the Peking Opera - a National Treasure Western Entertainment Lures Many Talented Youngsters Away from the Traditional Art Form
FOLLOWING in his parents' footsteps, Li Chun aspired to perform in the Peking Opera.But now he's not so sure. Since the acting student was cast for a small part in "Farewell, My Concubine," an acclaimed film about the friendship of two Peking Opera singers...
Clinton's New Conundrum: Promoting Democracy Is No Guarantee of Peace
IT'S a principle the Clinton administration has embraced wholeheartedly: Democracies don't fight each other. Their government leaders are too used to resolving political problems via compromise, the theory holds. Their people, as a whole, have little...
Cold, Wet Nose of the Law Nudges Beijing Dog Owners
A HUANG'S days in Beijing may be numbered. Bought three years ago for $1,200 by restaurateur Jiang Zhu, the sleek German shepherd has been doted upon like a member of the family and daily fed with big slabs of meat, cake, and ice cream.Now, though, Ahuang's...
Cop School, Where Blues Lose Justification for Wrongdoing
IN a four-story beehive on a busy Mexico City boulevard, hundreds of students sit in various cramped classrooms learning what it takes to be a cop."What is man?" asks the teacher in a course on human rights. In a class on organized crime, students -...
EU and the US Model
PUNDITS in the United States have been scurrying for weeks trying to put their fingers on just why the American public is in such a sour mood as the country approaches midterm elections Nov. 8.Unemployment is down, nearing what economists consider to...
Events
INDIANA PLANE CRASH PROBED Investigators are trying to discover why American Eagle Flight 4184 from Indianapolis to Chicago crashed Oct. 31 about 60 miles short of its destination, killing all 64 passengers and four crew members. Witnesses said wreckage...
Five Years after Fall of the Wall, Few East Berliners Celebrate Anniversary Evokes Nostalgia for Less-Tumultuous Times
PERHAPS the most remarkable thing about Bouche Street these days is what's no longer there.For more than 25 years, the Berlin Wall sliced this corner of the city down the middle of the street. Some in the Communist East lived literally within spitting...
Foes Misread US Fear of Casualties in War, a Necessary but Terrible Thing Happens: Americans Become Ruthless
AMERICANS do not have the stomach for casualties," said Bosnian-Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, dismissing an American threat to intervene in the former Yugoslavia. This is the one point on which United States policymakers and America's potential adversaries...
Germany's Economy Is Just Fine, Thank You
The article "Tuning Up the Engine of Europe's Economy," Oct. 19, is rather unbalanced, and quotes only the critics of Germany's social and economic system. There are numerous economists and politicians both in Germany and outside who would dispute many...
GOP's Surprise Weapon in `94 Black Candidates Series: VOTE '94
J. C. WATTS has a good shot at making political history.If the former college and professional football star captures Oklahoma's Fourth Congressional District seat on Nov. 8 - a race he currently leads - he will become the first black Republican to...
Living Life Unretouched
I LOOKED at the 1917 picture of my grandfather being sworn in as an American citizen. From the camera's angle, he appeared tall. I remember my green-eyed grandfather was a short man whose nails were stained by photographic darkroom chemicals. On Sundays,...
Met Conductor Reveals the Pattern in Strauss's Patchworked Opera under Christian Thielemann's Baton, Phrasing in `Arabella' Becomes Orderly
ARABELLA Music by Richard Strauss. Libretto by Hugh von Hofmannsthal. Production by Otto Schenk. Conducted by Christian Thielemann. At the Metropolitan Opera Nov. 3, 7, and 11.</P><P>WHEN the young German conductor Christian Thielemann...
Moscow's Homeless Are Left out in the Cold as City Militias Use Hoses and Sticks on Them
AS dusk settled coldly over the railroad sidings at Moscow's Kursky station one recent evening, a line of shabbily dressed men shuffled toward a tureen of soup.The only hot food that most of them ate that day was the steaming broth that Lyudmila Pavlova...
Present Shock: Russia under Economic Strain
IN the three years since Russian President Boris Yeltsin selected "shock therapy" as his preferred way to transform a moribund Communist economy into a vibrant market, debate over his choice has only escalated, both inside or outside Russia.Other nations...
Science and Health and Religious Faith
I LEARNED the other day that a friend had been very active in his church during his youth, but then he had faced several shattering events that shook his faith in God. At first he went through a period of blaming God for all that had happened. Then...
Secretary Reich and the Disintegrating Middle Class
IF these times are good, why do they seem so bad to me?" is a question many Americans have been asking lately. We speak of "the unemployment rate" as 5.9 percent, for instance, but there are really many unemployment rates: 3 percent for the college-educated,...
SOMETHING OLD, AND NEW Finding Dollars and Sense in Historic Preservation
HISTORIC preservationists often are regarded - with some justification - as people who breathe in the present but who live in the past.But many preservationists are looking up from their history books and out from their lovingly restored cupolas onto...
`Tree-Huggers' Fail to Shift Western Politics Environmentalists and Others Are Moving to the West, but Unpopular Clinton Administration Efforts to Change Land-Use Policies Have Led Many Democrats to Turn to the GOP Series: VOTE '94
THE "New West" has been going through considerable demographic and economic change as those moving in bring new values and lifestyles to an area steeped in tradition and myth.But will the region's greatest migration since the opening of the Oregon Trail...
US-Venezuela Spat over `Dirty Gas' Goes to the GATT Caracas Claims New Law Unfairly Favors US Refiners
A NEW United States law forces Venezuela to sell only low-polluting gasoline in the US. But Venezuelan officials are crying "discrimination" in a case spotlighting the growing friction between US environmental standards and international trade rules.In...
When Police Arrive, Mexicans Serve and Protect Themselves Perceptions of Corruption and Brutality Are Widespread among a Public Wary of Violence
THE residents of Mexico City's central Roma neighborhood thought they lived in a safe and attractive place. Designated a "cultural corridor," the early-20th-century district was attracting new restaurants and art galleries and sprucing up its colonial-style...
Will US Effort in Angola Really Lead to Peace?
WHEN President Clinton took office he made a major commitment to multilateral peacekeeping operations. So far he has been true to his word. There are 19,000 troops in Haiti; thousands more are scheduled for deployment in Kuwait. United States warplanes...
With Fewer Workers, Britain Can't Support Costly Welfare Conservatives Focus on US-Style `Workfare,' Labour on Education
THERE'S little shame in drawing a welfare check in Britain. And the ruling Conservative Party, and to a lesser extent the Labour opposition, see that as a problem.As is the case in other industrialized nations, Britain faces a graying work force, and...
World Bank Says Retire Creaking Pension Systems
FROM Boston to Beijing, the overall age of the world population is rising, as fertility rates fall and life expectancy increases. But formal and informal financial-security systems for seniors aren't keeping pace with the need.In developing nations,...