The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 26, 1995

1996: Looking Good for Markets but Analysts See Stock Gains in the 10-Percent Range, Far below This Year's Heady Pace Series: YOUR MONEY
THIS year turned out to be a remarkably successful one for stocks and bonds, with markets spurred by declining interest rates, low inflation, and modest but steady economic growth in the United States.The consensus view on Wall Street is that 1996 will...
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Can Alexander Sing Comeback-Kid Tune?
IT was only a little more than four years ago that the highly regarded Democratic adviser - the late John White - came to a Monitor breakfast and said if his longtime friend, Bill Clinton, won the presidential nomination, it would be a "nightmare" campaign...
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Dayton Accord's Dangerous Dueling Missions
NATO advance teams head into Bosnia and Herzegovina. The United States Congress anguishes over its reluctant votes of support for the NATO mission. The peoples who have suffered the excesses of the Bosnian war begin to look to the current peace plan...
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Do You Really Want to Do That? Taking a Spiritual Look at Events and Issues of Special Interest to Young People
A FRIEND of mine told me about the time he took chemistry in high school. There was one boy in the class who always wanted to work ahead of the teacher. He was superconfident about how smart he was, and he didn't like to follow directions.One day the...
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Fuel for the Needy
ONLY a few months ago people in places such as Chicago were doing all they could to try to stay cool in the blistering summer heat. Now it's the cold they're contending with. Some low-income families are forced to choose between buying groceries and...
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Home Sales Boom in 'Murphy Brown' Segment of Market
WHEN Gayle Lucas moved into her brick and stucco house in Minneapolis four months ago, the recently divorced mother of three figured she would be the only woman homeowner in her neighborhood. So after settling in, Ms. Lucas was surprised to count at...
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In Adopting Black Babies, Whites 'Become African' COLOR BLIND IN SOUTH AFRICA
WHEN Penny Haswell, a white South African, was first handed her adopted black daughter, Ningi, she nearly dropped her in shock. The infant was ice-cold, caked in dirt, and wrapped in an old rag.Now, a few years later, Ningi is a bright, confident six-year-old,...
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In Russia, It's Not So Much Who Wins as How You Vote
THE elderly man at polling station 597 on the outskirts of Moscow was distraught. Confronted by two long ballots of parties and individual candidates to parliament, he could not remember the names he had carefully decided to vote for.Facing much pleading...
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'No Nukes in Our Backyard' Stance by Southeast Asia Riles US, China ASEAN DRAWS A LINE
At first glance, the proposal seemed harmless but impressive.Ten Southeast Asian nations signed a treaty last month prohibiting the use, manufacture, and sale of nuclear weapons in the region. Their nuclear-free zone became the largest ever.But to the...
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Pakistan Cracks Down on Foreign Islamists after Embassy Attack
In the last few weeks, signs of beefed-up security across Pakistan's capital have become all too obvious.Motorists driving up to the Marriott Hotel - the trendiest meeting place in Islamabad - have been hard-pressed to find a parking spot since the hotel...
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Photographer's Final Journey in Indochina
Highways to a WarBy Christopher J. KochViking, 469 pp., $23.95His Asian friends call him "The Lucky One," for his ability to show up at a firefight, shoot his film, and return safely to a hotel crammed with correspondents who would rather find out about...
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Poetry Needs Nurturing in an Interview, Publisher-Poet James Laughlin Says Today's 'Climate of Perception' Has Changed
The Country RoadBy James LaughlinZoland Books149 pp., $22.95When James Laughlin was studying with Ezra Pound in 1935, Pound gave the aspiring poet some valuable advice: Your poems are horrible. Stop writing and find something useful to do with your life.Then...
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S. Africa's Crime Wave
SOUTH Africa's transition to a smoothly functioning multiracial democracy has faced tremendous hurdles of political factionalism and economic inequity. But for many South Africans, the chief obstacle may be the razor-wire-crowned fences going up in Johannesburg...
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Stanford Theater: Race Relations 101 A Collaboration between the University and Troubled East Palo Alto Helps Bridge a Historic Town-Gown Divide
FOR students at elite Stanford University in Palo Alto, the adjoining town of East Palo Alto has always been the other side of the tracks, or more literally, the other side of the freeway.Until not so long ago, the largely African-American and Hispanic-populated...
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The Greatest Gifts They'd Ever Given Series: KIDSPACE
Toast was lying on her bed, deep in thought. It was Saturday morning, and she still had her pajamas on, the ones with her favorite rock band stenciled on the front. Outside the window, snow was falling in puffy flakes, turning the world a pretty white."Have...
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The Temporary Turtle That Refused to Be Boxed in Series: KIDSPACE
He wandered into our lives in Glendale, Calif., on a sunny Saturday morning. "Mama! Look what we found!" My brother and I staggered into the kitchen, carrying a huge knobby turtle.Astonished, our mother plopped her dishcloth back into the soapy water...
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Unsettled Budget Leaves State Plans on Shaky Ground
IN a normal year, Maryland would be printing its budget documents this week, and the governor would be working on his State of the State speech.But this year, the budget is only penciled in, and Democratic Gov. Parris Glendening still does not know if...
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Urgent: Reform Bilingual Education Children Put in Programs against Parents' Wishes with Disastrous Results
THE movement to make English the official language of the United States has picked up considerable steam recently with endorsements by Sen. Bob Dole and hearings in both the House and Senate. Unfortunately, many of the congressional advocates of official...
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US Troops in Bosnia Depend on Array of High-Tech Eyes, Ears
WITH millions of land mines thought to be hidden in Bosnia-Herzegovina's snow-covered fields and forests, knowing where to tread may mean the difference between life and death for American peacekeeping troops.To ensure they don't stray in the rugged...
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World Aid Groups Snuggle Up to the Camera Facing Post-Cold-War Donor Fatigue, NGOs Hone PR to Seek Funds
WHERE in the world is Goma?For most of the world, it took a humanitarian crisis to find the answer. After countless refugees from Rwanda's war started flooding the Zairian town, the world's media followed suit, putting the town - and the crisis - on...
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