The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 3, 2000

A 'Good Citizen' Tries Turning World-Beater
Sevgi Ipek needs a vacation. The manager of the Citizens Global Equity Fund says she has been working 15-hour days seven days a week ever since she was featured in Business Week last December. The article, along with the fund's recent performance,...
Read preview Overview
A Towering Bed Makes Me Small Again
I have no particular schedule for replacing things that get worn out. The number of years something is supposed to last is of no interest to me, and as a result, everything I own hangs around for much longer than it should. Then all at once my vision...
Read preview Overview
Bottom-Line Ethics
Ethics in business? The idea was once a contradiction, like working moms or bluejeans in the office. But take this latest example of how the long arm of ethics is quickly catching up with the hidden hand of the market: Last week, eight clothing retailers,...
Read preview Overview
Buddy, Can You Spare $200 Billion? the US Can!
Congress has a problem that we'd all like to have: too much money. Federal revenues are piling up so fast it could discombobulate the political scene. The growing surplus makes George W. Bush's plan for a $300 billion tax cut over five years more possible...
Read preview Overview
Building Your Case for a Better Paycheck
Negotiating your salary is probably one of the most important feats of verbal wrangling you will likely never perform. The majority of us get so excited about landing an offer (or a raise) that we leave it at that. Yet research shows that most workers...
Read preview Overview
Charity That Changes Society
Charity clearly comes naturally to Americans, who generously gave away $175 billion last year. But does charity work? For all the good it does, the answer is that traditional philanthropy, unfortunately, reinforces what is instead of working toward...
Read preview Overview
China's Migrant Schools Skirt Law ; Migrant Laborers Living in Illegal Urban Shantytowns Create Schools to Keep Their Families Together in the City
The Xingzhi primary school is a smudge of packed dirt and drafty shacks on the outskirts of Beijing, brightened only by the children's colorful clothes and the propaganda on the walls. "Society is our savior!" exhorts one large poster: This school relies...
Read preview Overview
College Players Still Amateurs ... but Barely
Madness is the sports clich for this time of year, when rising stars and workaday math majors share the court to determine college basketball's national champions. More than other sporting events, the NCAA Division I tournament is a showcase of American...
Read preview Overview
Concerns Rise as Ecoterrorists Expand Aim ; Biotech Research and Fur Farms Are the Latest Targets of Fringe Groups on the Far Left
They call themselves "elves," but their activities are more like those of the Unabomber than of Santa's little helpers. And if some lawmakers around the country have their way, these radical environmental outlaws will be treated like the Mafia - as racketeers....
Read preview Overview
Conservatives as Journalists? Why Not?
Regarding Greg Crosby's March 30 opinion piece "Something's just not right": I find myself growing increasingly puzzled by his comment, which echoes the voices of others, namely that "... liberal entertainers, journalists, and executives seem to predominate...
Read preview Overview
Divide Grows over Elian's Future ; Washington and Miami Seem Further Apart as Boy's Case Enters a Critical Week
Ada Mejia spends up to eight hours every day standing vigil outside Elian Gonzalez's house. She says she is not worried about international legal precedents or the fine points of US immigration and family law. All she wants is for Elian to live free...
Read preview Overview
Has Giuliani's 'Tough Talk' Gone Too Far?
Saying there's tension in New York City is a lot like saying there are cars in Detroit. Tension is what makes New York go round. Creative energy, subway sneers, rude cab drivers are all part of the grand mosaic that make New York the magic kingdom of...
Read preview Overview
How to Avoid Taxes When a Merger Brings a Windfall
Q My father-in-law owns a sizable number of shares of a company which will soon be bought out by another company. The buyout includes half cash and half stock. He has owned the shares a long time and there is potential for a large capital-gains tax....
Read preview Overview
How to Find Clues about a Company's Policies
Consumer groups can tell you where to buy the best vacuum cleaner. Environmental groups rate the cleanest and dirtiest companies. But when it comes to human rights, there's no easy scorecard. The idea is too new. "A consumer wants to know who are the...
Read preview Overview
In a Big Shift, US Parents Tilt to Bush ; Clinton Scandals and Concern about Public Morality Count Heavily in Their Choice
Four years ago, President Clinton was famous for being far more popular among women than among men as he sought a second term. And among women with children at home, Mr. Clinton thoroughly dominated Republican nominee Bob Dole: Mothers preferred Clinton...
Read preview Overview
Is the West Too Quick to Sanction? ; A UN Official Quit Last Week over the Human Cost in Iraq of Sanctions. US Curbs Cover Half of the World Population
Sanction fatigue is setting in. This diplomatic stick, employed more times by President Clinton than any other leader in US history, is losing its effectiveness and appeal on the global stage. High-profile failings of economic sanctions - especially...
Read preview Overview
No Fear in Love
The connection that a person's thoughts have to health and healing is becoming more and more obvious. One of the most satisfying things in my life is to see proof of how God, who is divine Love, destroys fear of all kinds - and heals. The Apostle John...
Read preview Overview
Pushing to Clean Up Brazil's Waterways
Fernando Gomes stretches over the bridge and pulls his net out of the murky green waters of the Canal de Joatinga, where Rio de Janeiro's flatland lagoons flow out to the Atlantic Ocean. The retired military officer isn't having much success. A morning's...
Read preview Overview
Showing Workers a Way Up ; Companies Operating Abroad Pay Closer Attention to Human Rights
Just as the environment climbed to the top of corporate agendas during the 1990s, human rights looks likely to gain more attention this decade. Already, incidents in California, Sudan, China, and Nigeria have forced a small cadre of companies to take...
Read preview Overview
State May Give Drunk Drivers Death Penalty ; N. Carolina Is at Front of Trend That Treats Vehicular Homicide as Just Plain Murder
Building for more than a decade, the trend toward harsher penalties for drunken drivers who kill is nearing its uppermost extreme: the death penalty. Here in North Carolina - where the drunk-driving laws are perhaps the toughest in the nation -the state...
Read preview Overview
The Daddy That Dreams Are Made Of
Even before my daughter could talk, she found ways to express a preference for her father. Nearly every time my husband and I approached her crib together, her little arms reached out in his direction. I may have been jealous, but I didn't blame her....
Read preview Overview
Today's Story Line
The US has relied heavily on trade sanctions as a diplomatic club. But the efficacy of this blunt instrument is again being challenged. Few now argue that UN sanctions are working against Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. In Beijing, some 100 schools are...
Read preview Overview
Top Trends Consumers Should Consider
Consumers usually have a lot on their minds. So much so that they have little time to think about what makes them pay higher prices, or hurts the quality of goods they buy. That's the main job of the Consumer Federation of America, a nonprofit group...
Read preview Overview
USA
Talks between the US government and Microsoft broke down as a judge trying to mediate a settlement in the antitrust suit against the software giant said he was ending his effort. Federal appeals court Judge Richard Posner in Chicago said disagreements...
Read preview Overview
When Pocketbook Issues Clash with Human Rights ; Alleged Violations in Chechnya and China Top the UN's List at the Geneva Meetings This Month
This month at an annual ritual in Geneva, officials from 53 governments are struggling to determine which states should be branded human rights violators. But, to the frustration of many delegates to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, the behind-...
Read preview Overview
World
It would be "simply insufferable" for Syrian troops to move into south Lebanon once Israel vacates its security zone there, a senior Jerusalem government official said. Communications Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, a retired general, was reacting to...
Read preview Overview