The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 22, 1994

A Life in Academia, Fighting Gender Bias
ONE widely held perception that has long puzzled me is the assumption that academia is the last place a writer should look for interesting material. Certainly, Jill Ker Conway's account of her own academic career, set forth with admirable clarity...
An Exhibit Where Every Brooch Tells a Story
IF a photograph, painting, or sculpture tells a story, could a necklace, as art, do the same?The Society of Arts and Crafts in Boston demonstrates that it can. The current exhibition, "The Telling of Stories: Jewelry and Fiber," is a show of works by...
Austrian Haven for Scholars Bounces Back the Salzburg Seminar, Known for Lively Academic Exchange, Has Benefited from a New Director and Fellows from Former Soviet Bloc
THE Salzburg Seminar is known to a postwar generation of knowledgeable Americans and Europeans as a place of vital intellectual exchange and fellowship. Since 1947, some 16,000 mid-career professionals from ages 30 to 50 have gathered to make international...
Bid to Reinvent Federal Bureaucracy Finds Beachheads
ONE year after Al Gore launched a sweeping drive to "reinvent" the way the federal government operates, the effort is besting cynics and "proving one of the most lively management reforms in American history."This is the conclusion of a thorough study...
Bottling Up Cuba
TO anyone who has seen firsthand the pitiful makeshift devices that Cubans have used to drift across the Florida Straits to freedom, President Clinton's announcement that fleeing Cubans will be detained and perhaps relocated to a third country, rather...
Called Home to the Country
From where I'm sitting now, in my brother-in-law's dining room, I can hear why we didn't buy that lovely little house across the street. The traffic here on Route 4, the only east-to-west thoroughfare across Vermont, is loud and clear.</P><P>The...
CHANGES to United States Currency
ENLARGED OFF-CENTER PORTRAITThe portraits of historical figures featured on bills will be moved off-center and will include more detail. "Humans recognize other human faces most readily.... {The greater detail} will enable regular people to better detect...
Croatia Reaps Benefits for Backing Bosnian Pact Assistance Flows in from US, EU, World Bank
POPE John Paul II's planned Sept. 10-11 visit here represents another political dividend for the Croatian government for its participation in the US-sponsored reconciliation between Bosnia-Herzegovina's Muslims and Croats.With economic hardship and endemic...
Don't Reverse Medical Liability Reforms
AMERICA is in the midst of a new civil war, a war that threatens to undercut the civil basis of our society. It is a war that pits American against American just as surely as our first Civil War pitted brother against brother. It is a war of lawsuits....
Events
MEXICANS VOTE IN CRITICAL ELECTION Millions of Mexicans went to the polls yesterday in a presidential election that could be the closest and most critical in the nation's history. Some experts were predicting a turnout of as much as 70 percent of...
France, Sudan Deny `Carlos' Trade-Off
AS the international terrorist known as "Carlos" sits in a Paris prison under tight security - awaiting trial for a 1982 attack in the French capital that killed one person and injured 63 others - there is widespread speculation here over his sudden...
HARD TIMES FOR RUSSIA'S CHILDREN Economic and Social Chaos Falls Heavily on Youngest Memebers of Society. Series: COVER STORY
IN some ways, Kiril Arminsky is your typical Russian 10-year-old. He prefers cheeseburgers to hamburgers. He loves to ski, and his favorite subject is math. If he has his choice of cartoons, he says, he'll take Chip and Dale over Mickey Mouse any day.But...
Home Schooling in Charter Schools: A Michigan Test Case Goes to Court
WHEN Noah Webster Academy opens this fall, none of its 1,300 students - who are spread across the state of Michigan - is expected to show up at the school. Instead, state-certified teachers at this public school will oversee the work students do at home....
Miami's Cuban Community Splits over Clinton Shift on Refugees
WHEN Cuban President Fidel Castro Ruz threatened to open the door for discontented Cubans to leave for the United States, the leadership of Cuban American community here responded that a massive influx of Cubans must not be allowed to happen.But when...
NAACP's New Horizons
BENJAMIN CHAVIS is gone as national director of the NAACP. What is left, we hope, is a still-vital organization poised for rejuvenation.The NAACP's 64-member board voted Saturday to oust Mr. Chavis, who had been under fire. In June, he stirred a controversy...
New Cuba Policy Aims to Head off A Deeper Crisis
BY rolling up the welcome mat for Cuban refugees and pledging to divert them to the United States naval base at Guantanamo Bay in their homeland, President Clinton has at a stroke reversed one of the most enduring United States foreign policies of the...
Poll Says More Americans Unlikely to Reelect Clinton
IF President Clinton ran for reelection today, 55 percent of Americans would be "very" or "somewhat" unlikely to vote for him, according to a new Time magazine/CNN poll.If the election were held today, Mr. Clinton would lose to former Joint Chiefs of...
Praying for Children
WHAT can one person do to help the world's children receive the love and nurturing that they deserve? To hope that a neglected child may someday find love and self-worth, or that justice may prevail eventually, is not enough, is it? Surely all children ...
Razing House Ma Bell Built
IN 1984, the United States broke Ma Bell's monopoly on the telephone business and opened the floodgates to long-distance competition. Ten years later, Congress is trying to finish the job.The House of Representatives has passed, and the Senate next month...
Should Judges Be Forced to Campaign?
IF a Texan's dream is to sit on that state's Supreme Court, it's not enough to be an accomplished lawyer or jurist, or even to have good political connections. The aspiring justice also has to be able to raise up to $2 million for the necessary statewide...
Soon the American Dollar Will Get A Whole New Look: What's Behind the Change?
BENJAMIN Franklin, Ulysses S. Grant, Andrew Jackson, and Alexander Hamilton are going high-tech. Last month, the United States Treasury announced that currency will be updated with new ink, designs, and anticounterfeiting devices.The Treasury says it...
Syria Now Sees, Reluctantly, Benefits of Peace with Israel Its Goals Are Unmet, but Damascus Finds Zealotry Is No Longer Effective
THREE years ago, the slogan of choice in the streets of Damascus, Syria, was former Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser's famous declaration: "What was taken by force must be restored by force."Today, President Hafez al-Assad has found another - and...
Two Candidates Jockey for Lead in Brazil Contenders Chase Undecided Workers and Middle Class in Presidential Elections That Many Brazilians Hope Will Address Inflation, Unemployment, and Corruption
THE campaign for Brazil's Oct. 3 presidential election has become a heated battle between the political left and right, and self-styled champions of the poor and middle class.Brazilians hope to elect a president who can reduce last year's 4,000 percent...
With the Need for Flexibility, Sometimes the `Boss' May Be A Hire from a Temp Agency
JIM Alexis is a special kind of temp worker. Far from clocking in a couple days of data processing, his last assignment was saving a $250 million printing company heavily laden with debt.Called an "interim executive," Mr. Alexis is part of a growing...