The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 19, 1997

After 1,875 Miles, Weary Rebels Enter Kinshasa, and Get Lost Eight Months of Fighting Later, Victors Navigate City Streets with Difficulty as Crowds Welcome the 'Liberators'
When the first column of troops from the Alliance of Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Congo/Zaire entered central Kinshasa this weekend, they did so by accident, losing their way in the broad streets of a city none had evidently visited before.Some...
An Upstream Solution to River Pollution from Wells in California to Atlanta's Chattahoochee, Much US Water Is Polluted. One Group Has a Plan
The northern Rockies are known as a pristine fountainhead of the American West. From out of the jagged snow-cropped peaks flow the crystal clear headwaters of three venerable river systems - the Columbia, Missouri, and Colorado - that help slake the...
Arizona Trial Roils a Desert Camelot
At the time, Fife Symington was as much a symbol of Arizona as saguaros and Scottsdale golf courses. While developer after developer went bankrupt during the great real-estate crash of the 1980s, Mr. Symington not only survived. He thrived.At the crest...
As 'Distance Learning' Takes off, US Lags Behind
Developing countries in South America, Eastern Europe, and elsewhere, unburdened by costly campuses or tenured faculty and bureaucracies, are exploiting the Internet and other new technologies to educate people once excluded from learning modern skills.Mexico,...
Bungle in the Jungle: How Zaire's Mobutu Failed Misjudging Western Support and His Own Sway in the Region, a Despot Self-Destructs
When rebels rolled into Zaire's capital Saturday, their easy victory there capped off one of the fastest military campaigns in recent African history. In eight months, they had succeeded in unseating one of the longest-ruling despots in modern memory.President...
Chill Is Gone, but Labor Still Wary
A brief warming trend arrived on the picket lines this spring, with workers and management at several major companies suddenly settling contract disputes.In the past two weeks, 57,000 unionized employees - from tiremakers to airline pilots - have called...
Drug Courts: More Evidence They Reduce Repeat Offenses Still, Some Criticize Use of Treatment over Punishment
What began as an experiment in Miami less than a decade ago is now emerging as one of the most significant reforms to the American criminal justice system in the last half century.In city after city, the latest research shows that drug courts are significantly...
For Disney, It's a Whole New Ball Game There's Plenty of Room for Field Sports but No Swimming Pool or Ice Rink, at Least Not Yet
If Disney builds it, people will come. Even before the company's Wide World of Sports complex became fully open and operational outside Orlando, the facility had more than 100 groups and events booked to use the first-class gyms, fields, baseball stadium,...
Greenspan Talks, Wall Street Balks; Less Secrecy at Fed
The veil of secrecy has come slowly off the face of the Fed, but not everyone likes what they see.Members of the Federal Reserve's Open Market Committee once took great pains to cloak not only their decisions on interest rates but the reasoning behind...
Higher Criticism Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Is the glass half full or half empty? That's an old question. Its answer depends on the measure of gratitude one feels. If the glass looks half empty, it may be that we're not grateful for what we do have already. We may criticize or devalue what...
Letters
Peacekeeping Hampered by UN Members"Why UN Quit as Fireman to the World's Hot Spots" (April 29) has the 'what' right but not the 'why.' The UN is in the firehouse, not eager to answer 911. Member states, most notably the US, refuse to provide adequate...
Merit Scholarships: Pivotal Shift in Aid More States - and Now the US - Are Giving Students Financial Aid on the Basis of Grades, after Decades of Focusing on Need
First there were scholarships for straight-A students, the kids with crisply ironed shirts and long attention spans. Then came college grants for poor and disadvantaged students. Now, B students have something to cheer about on graduation day.Following...
Move on Welfare Reform
President Clinton's pledge to end "welfare as we know it" was honored nine months ago. Or was it?The president famously (many Democrats say infamously) ended 61 years of federal welfare last August. He did so by signing into law GOP-authored legislation...
Pitino Deal Reverberates beyond Boston New Celtics Coach Promises to Work Hard for 'More Money Than I Am Worth'
Rick Pitino, the new coach of the Boston Celtics, has said he likes his players to have "PhDs - that's poor, hungry, and driven. Maybe not poor when they leave the locker room, but very much with a hunger to be better."Pitino has gone from basketball...
Prisons Grapple with Rapid Influx of Women - and Mothers
Dawn Ring misses her kids. She and a few other women sitting in a small classroom have drawn battered desks into a tight circle to talk. As with mothers everywhere, the conversation often comes back to their children.Mary and Dorothea worry about their...
Questioning Courts' Use of Psychiatric Witnesses
Whores of the Court: The Fraud of Psychiatric Testimony and the Rape of American JusticeBy Margaret A. HagenReganBooks 338 pp., $23 As her book's tendentious title suggests, Margaret Hagen has some strong opinions about the value of psychiatric testimony...
Reformer Calls for a System That Gets Back to the Basics INTERVIEW James Q. Wilson
First, there were Erik and Lyle Menendez, accused of brutally murdering their parents. Then, Lorena Bobbitt maimed her husband in his sleep. And in 1995, the O.J. Simpson criminal trial came to its dramatic and perplexing close.These high-profile criminal...
Senior Athletes Know No Limits at Arizona Sports Competition
Mary L. Bowermaster, a septuagenarian from Fairfield, Ohio, began a formal exercise program just 16 years ago. Today she competes around the country in tennis and track and field events.This week, (May 21-28) she and about 10,000 persons age 50 and...
Taking Zaire Easier Than Ruling the New 'Congo'
For thousands of Zaireans waving everything white from paper to socks, the rebel columns that took the capital this weekend were liberators who freed them from the crumbling 32-year regime of Mobutu Sese Seko.Residents were relieved at the fairly tranquil...
The Fed Seems Bemused, Wall Street Acts Confused No Clear Signals Ahead of Tomorrow's Fed Meeting on Interest Rates
ByInvestors pushed stocks up, then down last week as the economy sent mixed signals ahead of a pivotal Federal Reserve meeting tomorrow.And whatever the Fed decides, more volatility could be in store. While some analysts think investors would shrug off...
The News in Brief
The USPresident Clinton made it a national goal to develop an AIDS vaccine within a decade and said a research center would be established at the National Institutes of Health to aid the effort. The commitment, reminiscent of President Kennedy's vow...
To Nail a Truce in N. Ireland, Blair Hammers at Sinn Fein New Premier Offers Talks with IRA's Political Wing. but He Wants End to Terror
Britain's new prime minister, Tony Blair, is bidding to kick-start the Northern Ireland peace process amid rising hopes that a breakthrough may be possible.But he and Northern Ireland Secretary Marjorie Mowlam, nearly three weeks after the Labour Party...
What Books May Be
Books, to book-dealers and collectors, are artifacts. Ideally, they are rare survivors from a past that has left them untorn, unfoxed, unrubbed - and, even better, unread. If in mint condition, they have probably been treated as precious artifacts from...
What the Balanced-Budget Deal Means for Americans' Pocketbooks ADDING IT ALL UP
The balanced-budget deal finalized by President Clinton and congressional leaders Friday faces more hurdles before it is implemented. But while Congress now thrashes out the particulars of the agreement - a potentially rough-and-tumble process during...
Would You Hire a Lawyer Named 'Kitten'?
I'm in the midst of writing a bestseller. It addresses one of the primary issues affecting women's credibility and power, so I know it'll sell like hot cakes. The title says it all: "The Dangerous Practice of Naming Daughters, or Why I Am Often Mistaken...
Wrong Sort of Student Aid Today's 'Merit' Scholarships Rob the Poor
Imagine the scene. An upper-middle-class family, the mother a doctor, the father a lawyer, sitting at the kitchen table with their college-bound daughter. A fat envelope lies before them. They do not yet know that it conceals more than their daughter...