The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 9, 1997

Americans Move Piggybanks Offshore More People Set Up Accounts in Antigua or the Caymans to Avoid US Taxes and Justice System. Series: Only a Few Places in the World Have Laws That Allow Strictly Private Banking. These Include Luxembourg, Pictured above, the Caymen Islands, Antigua, and Ireland. BY PAUL AMES/AP
Once the shadowy tax havens of mafia bosses and global jetsetters, offshore banking operations are going mainstream - thanks in large part to the Internet. With the click of a few computer keys, anyone can set up a corporation in the Caymans, a trust...
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A Noble Act of Harmony in the Balkans Maverick Mayor Who Protects Minorities Won Reelection in Bosnia Last Month
Bosnia has been fractured by one of the most ferocious ethnic wars this century. Croats, Serbs, and Muslims, who lived together peacefully for decades, have killed neighbors or driven them from their homes to create "ethnically pure" regions.But not...
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Big Score for the Little Guys Small- and Mid-Size Stocks Now Look like the Ones to Beat after a Third-Quarter Comeback Led by the Tiniest of the Tiny
They're back - and whooping it up in the end zone.Through most of the 1990s, large-company stock funds dominated the mutual fund game. But in a comeback worthy of the Gipper, small-company stocks snatched the ball from their bigger rivals and ran downfield...
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Black Gold: Energy Funds Spout Profits for Investors
The value of energy-sector mutual funds burst skyward this year like an oil-patch gusher, enabling investors to merely doff their hats and let the profits rain in.The Standard & Poor's index of oil-well equipment and service stocks has soared 66 percent...
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Bond Funds Shed the Blues Falling Rates
Bond-fund managers gaze at low inflation and high stock prices, and they like what they see."Bonds are most attractive relative to stocks," says Daniel Fuss, who manages one of the nation's leading bond mutual funds, Loomis Sayles Bond Fund (800-633-3330)...
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Brazil's Forests Fading Fastest, Tree Study Says
Much of the world's original forests has been destroyed, and some countries will have no natural forests in 50 years if the rate of destruction continues, an environmental group reported yesterday.A new study by the World Wide Fund for Nature singled...
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California Rebound May Bounce Wilson into White House Bid
'Pistol" Pete Wilson, the Republican California governor who misfired woefully in his shot at the White House in 1996, has his gun back in the holster.He has been called one of America's most enduring and least endearing politicians, a Pentium-brain...
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Can Small-Cap Index Funds Follow Bigger Siblings?
Large-company index funds, long the darlings of this bull market, now must share the limelight with some stunning kid sisters.They track indexes of the small and mid-size companies that have outperformed their larger siblings of late."In recent months...
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Chinese Nuclear Exports: No Easy Ride
Does a state visit - even an important one - always need to be built around some claimed breakthrough in relations between the countries concerned?Isn't it enough of a benefit for China's President Jiang Zemin that, with China's human-rights situation...
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Defining the Look of Africa Whose Model?
The Safari Park Hotel in Nairobi is flooded with lights and music.Women in long, shimmering gowns and men in starched black ties swirl around the buffet eyeing the monumental display of food laid out on silver platters.Waiters wearing white gloves shuffle...
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Dirty Dollars II, III, IV
The campaign finance controversy is proving to be a feature-length Washington drama with no end of sequels. In one key episode this week, the McCain-Feingold reform bill got pulled from the Senate floor by majority leader Trent Lott, whose "poison pill"...
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Dreyfus Roars with Value Fund A 36 Percent Return Makes Peter Higgins's Dreyfus Midcap Value Fund a King in Mutual Fund Jungle
When he wanted another company to help build his portfolio, Peter Higgins went, where else, to a builder.Mr. Higgins snagged a California homebuilder called Kaufman and Broad, hammering out the sort of profit that a stock-picker lives for.He runs the...
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Europe Hums as Asia Dips Global Markets
American investors are pouring $3 billion a month into foreign stock mutual funds, hoping to spread their risks beyond a dauntingly high market in the United States.But the 25 percent surge in net money flows from last year has left many investors poorer,...
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Families Split by Immigration Policies When Husbands Come to Work in US, Wives and Children Have to Stay Behind
Anthony Mai knows something about government oppression. In 1989 he joined thousands of his fellow students in Shanghai to call for democracy during the crackdown in Beijing's Tiananmen Square.But today, it isn't the Chinese government that is the focus...
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For Millions of Korean-Chinese, A Pied Piper Beckons: S. Korea the South's Influence Grows in China's Northeast
Yanji is in many ways a clone of a South Korean metropolis: Korean blues wafting out of neon-lit karaoke parlors mix with the singsong chatter of ethnic Koreans strolling past clubs, restaurants, and saunas at the pulsating heart of the city.Billboards...
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Here's a Fat Candidate for the Line Item Veto
It's a little ironic that the military, an organization credited for having won the cold war, still embraces an economic philosophy most at home in the former Soviet Union.But as a recent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) study reports, the military's...
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High-Tech Funds Soar, but Can Also Sour Hot Technology
Investing is a like visiting an amusement park: There's something for everyone.The safety-minded can hop on the merry-go-round. Thrill-seekers head for the big roller-coaster. High-tech mutual funds definitely fall in the latter category.These specialized...
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How the Apple War Was Won
I picked up the largest apple I could find on my front lawn and bit in to see if it was what I remembered. "Wow, that's tart! Yup. That's a crab apple all right," I winced.When I was growing up in Connecticut, we had several crab apple trees on our front...
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In a War It Cannot Win, Israel Tries New Tactics Last Month's Big Loss of Soldiers in Lebanon Highlights Shift toward Guerrilla Warfare
When it came, the Israeli commando raid deep into southern Lebanon was no surprise to local villagers.They had been tipped off early: Unmanned Israeli planes had buzzed overhead for days, casing the area; and Israeli jet fighters, helicopters, and offshore...
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Index Funds Pass Baton to Stock Pickers Fund Overview
Wall Street gave investors clear messages in the third quarter: "Out with the big stock, in with the small." "Out with the index fund, in with the actively-managed portfolio."And by the looks of things, analysts say, investors would be wise to heed those...
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Letters
McCain, Feingold: No RetreatThe effort to reform the campaign finance system not only continues, but it's picking up steam.Despite attacks on the reform effort, many based on false information; despite attempts to turn a bipartisan reform movement into...
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Mini-Boom in Mining Echoes the Old West Copper and Uranium Rush
On the edge of this tiny desert town near the Mexican border sits a vast, empty pit - an abandoned strip mine some 500 yards across and hundreds of feet deep. For years, this yawning hole has been the most visible reminder of the town's past glory -...
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Oil Industry's Biggest Obstacle to Drilling: Public Resistance
American oil companies are probing deeper than ever into the earth's crust, pioneering sophisticated methods of extraction that allow them to reach natural fuels previously off limits to a drill bit.But despite all their technological progress, there...
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One Fund on Small-Cap Frontier
Day after day the top guns of the best small companies in the United States beat a path to Arsen Mrakovic's Manhattan door."Two to three companies come every day; sometimes five or more," he says. Their goal? To have their stocks snapped up by Mr. Mrakovic's...
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Pumpkins That Make More Than Scary Faces
As summer's green gives way to autumn's gold, pumpkins are suddenly cropping up everywhere.From Florida to Washington, from New Mexico to New England, pumpkins can be seen dotting furrowed fields like boccie balls, piled in front of farm stands, sporting...
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Quit Acting! Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Emotions were running high. She yelled hysterically, "Leave him alone!" as she held him close and tears streamed down her face. It was clear that he was dying, and she clung to his hand while they shared this final moment.Then the video clip ended,...
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Street People Turn Trash into Cash an Illiterate Scavenger in Brazil Founded an Association That Is a Model for Employing the Poor
For 40 years, Maria das Gracas Marcal, a second-generation scavenger, combed the streets of this metropolis of 2 million, collecting recyclable trash to feed her nine children.Over the years, she has worked in filthy clothing while pedestrians and store...
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The News in Brief
The USFormer deputy White House chief of staff Harold Ickes Jr. resumed his testimony before the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee after an opening statement that blamed any excesses in campaign fund-raising on "vague" federal law. Ickes said President...
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The Taming of the Shrub
In spite of what my husband says, I realized we had a problem long before the tree in the living room fell on my aunt. We weren't quick enough to yell "Timber!" but Nancy's reflexes were faster. She caught it and wrestled the thing upright.Good sport...
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Which Candidates Get to Speak on TV? in Key Free-Speech Case, the High Court Weighs Whether Public TV Has a Duty to Open Its Mikes to All Contestants
Ralph Forbes was a former American Nazi Party member with no cash, no campaign office, and a tendency to say things such as, "Clinton hates me and Hillary has tried to roast me with her eyeballs."So Arkansas public TV officials decided he had no chance...
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