The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 8, 1998

A Dash for 'E-Cash' in Europe Virtual Money Could Help during Big Wait for Common Currency. but Barriers Remain
Marianne Lebeau opens her purse to pay for a pain au raisin at the Au Pain Quotidien bakery in Brussels' chic Place du Sablons. But she doesn't take out any coins.Instead she hands over a Proton card. Unlike traditional magnetic- strip credit cards,...
America's Asian Markets Expand into Superstores
Fidgety black catfish in oversized tanks greet supermarket customers at 99 Ranch Market, located in this industrial section of Hawaii.Hiroshi Kobayashi, the supermarket's owner, unwraps a package filled with tiny slabs of mystery meat. "Duck tongue,"...
As Democracy Returns to Nigeria, Muslims Are Sticking to Religion MOSQUE AND STATE
The muezzin call to Islamic prayer comes five times a day, and five times a day, the pulse of daily life in this northern Nigerian town almost stops. Merchants stop selling, children stop running. The women become invisible. And the hot wind from the...
Does Paid Prep Raise SAT Scores? BIG STAKES, BIG MONEY
Here's a quiz for students and parents during SAT season. Paying for test prep:A. Raises SAT scores, but only a little on average.B. Helps students gain huge score increases. C. Actually lowers scores on average. D. Yields small or large increases,...
Evaluating the Evaluators
Consider these lines from student critiques: "It is unfair to drop someones (sic) grade because he/she missed too many days." "We were bombarded with information about authors that was boring with fact." "He had a tendency to be critical on objective...
First Evidence of Pollution Sullying Other Continents Scientists Document How a Chinese Dust Storm Affected Air Quality in North America. Research May Lead to Call for More Global Antipollution Efforts
When the sky turned white last April, Thomas Cahill at the University of California at Davis knew the great Chinese dust cloud he was expecting had arrived. He and a number of other researchers had been following it through satellite data since it rose...
Getting Inn on the Action A B&B OF ONE'S OWN
You're yearning for a change. You enjoy staying in inns and have a knack for cooking, interior decorating, and striking up conversations with strangers. Suddenly the idea hits you: Quit your job and start up a bed-and-breakfast.For many, opening a country...
If You Want to Go Far Afield, Find an Undergrad Research Grant
As I entered my first year at Occidental College in Los Angeles, I never dreamed I would get a research grant.I heard about the opportunity for funded undergraduate research from an upperclassman who received a grant the previous year. I was warned that...
Independent Counsels
Long before anyone knew about Monica Lewinsky, the independent counsel law was under fire. Democratic defenders of President Clinton were angered by Kenneth Starr's probe back when "Whitewater" was a headline. Republicans blasted the system during Iran-Contra.Now...
Letters
The costs of preventing warThe article "Not just a world cop, US spends big to keep peace" (Dec. 2) seemed factually correct, but missed the big story.The biggest of the "big" expenditures noted was $5.1 billion this year for Israel-Egypt peace. Let's...
Link to US Indian Origins Russian Geneticist Claims Best Match Yet of Native American and Siberian DNA
A leading Russian geneticist claims he has taken a giant step toward identifying the precise origin of native Americans, based on his genetic studies of the Tuvan people in Siberia.Ilya Zakharov, deputy director of Moscow's Vavilov Institute of General...
Make Way for Urbanites Small Towns and Schools Sure Look Good. but Cultures Clash as Newcomers Place New Demands on Quiet Hamlets
Ask a lot of young American families about their Top 10 desires and you'll probably hear the following: a comfortable lifestyle, room for two careers, strong schools, and a large house amid plenty of of green space.Sounds nice. But add those dreams together...
Move Grows to Clip Special Counsels' Reach Nonpartisan Commission Calls for Narrowing Independent Counsel Law
The independent counsel law was never meant to create a zealous office of prosecutors, boring away interminably at executive branch oversight.By nature, the process of vigorously scouring the actions of those covered by the law - the president and 48...
Mugabe's Dictatorship Erodes Gracefully or by Force, Zimbabwe Leader Must Go
You can take advantage of your people only so long. Eventually they rise up in protest. That is what is happening now in Zimbabwe, where the tide of discontent runs high.The protesting Zimbabwe Confederation of Trade Unions is saying "enough is enough."...
Protest and Prayer in a Redwood Perch
When Julia Hill, a preacher's daughter from Arkansas, arrived in the woodsy environs of northern California in the summer of 1997, she blended easily and quickly into a loose-knit community of environmental activists.She volunteered to climb a redwood...
Puzzle Me This. . . . Riddles' Curious History
No one knows how the tradition of riddles started, but it's clear that people have been trying to stump each other with clever questions for ages.The earliest recorded riddles come from the ancient Greeks and even the Bible. The Greeks believed priests...
Rolling Back Stiff Drug Sentences Twenty-Five Years after the First Law Mandating Tough Prison Terms, States Look for New Ways to Punish Drug Offenders
A quarter century after New York ushered in the nation's first mandatory drug-sentencing laws, some states are showing signs of rolling back the mandates - a trend with far-reaching ramifications for the American criminal-justice system.Worried about...
Summit Offers Insight into US Values MORALITY OF SOCIAL SECURITY
There are times in society when a policy question carries such profound moral implications, all the key players are forced to stop and become philosophers for a moment.That is what's happening in the debate over the future of Social Security.Today and...
The Bush Power Family
The Big Story of the November election was the emergence of the Bush Power Family. Yes, much of it was already in place. George had been president; George W. was already a Texas governor. But with the election came the addition of Jeb as governor in...
The Grinch Didn't Steal My Christmas Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
I'd brought to a family gathering the then newly published book "How the Grinch Stole Christmas," intending to read it to everyone. Well, just as I opened it, my husband pointed to our young nieces and said quietly, "Why don't you let one of the girls...
The History Behind the Salvation Army - and Its Bell Ringers
Among the lasting images of the holiday season, along with colored lights and crowded malls, are The Salvation Army's omnipresent bell ringers.You probably do your part at least once, plunking your change into a red kettle on your way out of a store....
The News in Brief
The USWhite House attorneys were scheduled to begin today their defense of President Clinton before the House Judiciary Committee. They will have two days to air their arguments against impeachment. The panel originally scheduled one day for defense...
Today's Story Line:
New tools of science are helping people find their roots across continents. In Siberia, Moscow Bureau Chief Judith Matloff found a scientist who may have located a people who are the most genetically like native Americans. That could put a new spin on...
US Sees Growth in Foreign Student Enrollment - for Now Series: African Students (L. to R.) Gloria Mudogo, Helena Mensah-Bonsu, Chao Sio, and Rita Thanga Take a Break at Northeastern University in Boston. A New Report Shows a Rise in International Students in the US, but Officials Suggest Cautious Optimism. BY JOHN NORDELL - STAFF
One way to measure the strength of a nation is look at its gross national product or its military firepower. Another is to see how many foreign students opt to go to school there.After three years of stagnation, the number of international college students...