The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 26, 2001

A Deal These Second-Graders Couldn't Refuse ; Decade-Old Promise of Free Tuition Yields Fruit as Students Stick with School and Graduate
Maria Pereira will never forget the sultry June evening when she and the parents of 69 second-graders were hurriedly summoned to school for a "mysterious" announcement. As they entered Harrington Elementary's auditorium in Cambridge, Mass., questions...
Campaign Finance Fire Not Burned out Yet
In a presidential year when we were at peace and the economy was good, the issue that stirred up the most interest was campaign- finance reform. The voters, particularly during the primaries and with John McCain pushing the issue, were upset, even...
Concerns Mount at Racial Unrest in Northern England ; Burnley, Hit by Two Nights of Riots, Is the Fourth Town to Erupt in Recent Months
British police were meeting with community leaders in the northern English town of Burnley yesterday, following two nights of clashes between white and South Asian youths. The unrest makes Burnley the fourth northern town in the past three months...
Court OKs Political Spending Cap ; Yesterday's 5-4 Decision Upholding Spending Limits May Bolster Campaign- Finance Reform Efforts in Congress
The US Supreme Court has approved an important aspect of campaign-finance reform, upholding federal limits on the amount of money political parties can spend in direct coordination with their candidates during election campaigns. In a major ruling...
Don't Seek a Pardon for Berenson
Alejandro Toledo, the president-elect of Peru, visits Washington this week. When he takes office on July 28 he will face the daunting task of rebuilding both Peru's economy and democracy. Some in Washington, however, want to make Peru's economic and...
For African-Americans, Trend Is Back to the South ; Economic Opportunity Is Creating a Reverse Migration
When Christopher Dawson returned to South Carolina after a stint in the Vietnam War, his only options were to pick tomatoes or weed other people's yards for a few dollars. Little work was available in the South in the 1960s, especially for a black...
Grow a Garden - for Free ; with Care, Patience, and a Few Supplies, You Can Turn Cuttings into Whole Plants
Lots of plants are very good at having families. Have you noticed? Their flowers turn into seeds. The seeds fall to the ground and make new plants. But seeds are not the only way to get new plants. You can (carefully!) cut off little parts of plants...
Koizumi's Popularity Rubs off ; the Japanese Prime Minister Gave a Boost to Local Tokyo Candidates in Yesterday's Election
In her whole life it never dawned on Yoko Kabashima to hang a picture of a Japanese leader in her home. But the middle-age housewife left the headquarters of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party yesterday clutching two posters of a heroic-looking...
Link to the Law Puts Spark in the School Day
A courtroom is rising in the old band room at Hirsch Metropolitan High School in Chicago. The lockers where instruments were stored have been pulled out, and in one corner of the newly sanded floor, outlines for the judge's bench and jury box have...
'No' Is Not an Option for Teens Seeking to Talk with Ed Officials
Boston's annual Teen Empowerment Youth Peace Conference is about airing the issues, speaking up, and communicating with adults about what is going on in urban teens' lives. So when state education officials didn't show up last month after being invited...
Not off My Shore
Few sights raise environmental hackles more than offshore oil drilling rigs, spoiling the view and threatening beaches with spills. Yet many of the untapped energy reserves in the United States lie just off the coast. If the country is serious about...
Piano Strikes a Chord with Middle Class in China
Basketball and cartoon drawing were 10th-grader Hui Yunhu's main hobbies when he lived in a small Shanghai flat. But five years ago, the Hui family moved in with the maternal grandparents. That meant extra space - and room for a used Chinese-made...
Publishers Lose Ground to Freelancers in Copyright Case
The US Supreme Court has just wrenched a key part of US copyright law out of the age of the printing press and into the age of digital cyberspace. In a ruling with important ramifications for American publishers, the nation's highest court ruled...
Senate Balance of Power May (Again) Hinge on One Man ; Democrats Begin to Circle Wagons around Sen. Robert Torricelli, Currently the Subject of a Federal Probe
For more than four years, US Sen. Robert Torricelli (D) has been the subject of a corruption probe - and for most of this time his fellow Democrats have not exactly rushed to his defense. Now, however, some are beginning to question the way the Torricelli...
Small Steps to Shore Up Mideast Cease-Fire ; in a Valley Where Crossfire Was Frequent, There Is a Sign of Cease- Fire Optimism: Rebuilding
Six months ago, after Israeli forces blasted bullets through every window of his apartment, flecked the ceiling of his living room with shrapnel, and shot a finger-size hole through the headboard of his bed, Nashat Siman got his family out of the...
Students Balk at Being Searched for Guns ; A Los Angeles Case Involving a School's Procedures May Clarify Lawsuits Nationwide
For eight years now, officials at Los Angeles public schools have carried out random searches of students on a daily basis. The policy, which applies to every middle and high school in the district, followed two separate student deaths in 1993 - both...
This Band Was Made for You and Me
During the school day, James Phair carries all the authority of his position as principal of PS 107, a New York City elementary school in Flushing, Queens. But on Thursday afternoons, when he plays the trombone with his school's Millennium Orchestra,...
Trade-Offs for Open Trade?
In the weeks ahead, President Bush will need some bucking up on his commitment to open trade. Lately, many nations of the world have been treating such trade without what Mr. Bush calls the necessary "moral imperative." China and Japan, for instance,...
Vegas Keeps Lights Burning as Tab Soars ; Electric Lights Define Las Vegas, and Even in a Power Crunch, Nevada Isn't about to Let It's Showcase Attraction Go Dark
In energy-starved California these days, it's de rigueur to turn off the lights when they're not in use. And perish the thought of producing more illumination than really necessary: It's become a 40- watt culture. But when Californians cross the Nevada...
Would You Admit Yourself?
The giggling began moments after John Dolan unveiled his plan to the university admissions staff: Each would retake the SAT test and apply to the University of Denver, just like a typical high-school applicant. "We were laughing and saying, 'Are you...