The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 4, 2002

A Big Test of Nuclear Deterrence ; Atomic Arsenals Defuse S. Asia Tensions - So Far
The current crisis in South Asia has been profoundly affected by the mere presence of India's and Pakistan's nuclear arsenals. Fighting may yet erupt over the disputed territory of Kashmir, despite the specter of possible escalation to atomic war. Indian...
A Composer of Grand Gestures
Philadelphia-born Aaron Jay Kernis is America's most honored younger composer. Last November he received the world's top international music composition prize, the University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award, worth $200,000 and previously given to such...
At Ground Zero, Uncertainty over How to Pay Respects ; Visitors at a New Observation Deck Uneasily Balance Reverence with Clicking Cameras
Leaning against a police barricade within eyeshot of ground zero, Carrie Newton can tune out a traffic officer yelling at pedestrians in the street, but she can't ignore all the cameras around her. "I would never take pictures here," says the lawyer...
Behind His Success Is Talent - and Trust
Kevin Spacey couldn't help but smile at the ovation his latest film, "The Shipping News," received at its Los Angeles premiere in December. The film, based on Annie Proulx's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name, opens nationwide this month....
Brazil's Drug Users Will Get Help, Instead of Jail ; Sweeping New Laws Are Based on the View That Drug Users Need Treatment, Not Criminal Punishment
On the continent that produces most of the world's cocaine and much of its heroin and marijuana, its largest country is softening punishment on recreational drug users. The Brazilian Congress adopted landmark legislation that substitutes alternative...
Buzkashi - an Afghan Tradition Thrives ; A Favorite Afghan Pastime Reflects the Values of the Country: Strength, Courage, and Horsemanship
The dozens of turbaned horsemen on their prancing steeds assemble on a dusty field on the outskirts of this city in northern Afghanistan. Despite their shouts and cracking whips, however, the riders' intent is peaceful. As they do on most Friday afternoons...
Compensate All 9/11 Families Equally
"How do you measure a life?" Jonathan Larson, the author of the musical "Rent," answered his own question: "Measure in love." Ken Feinberg, the special master of the Sept. 11 Victims' Compensation Fund, has a different formula. It's based on last year's...
Creative Team Finds Deeper Meaning in 'Mind' ; through the Film, They Hope to Foster Better Understanding of Mental Illness
Mathematician John Nash was a legend in his field by age 30, immediately following the Second World War. In 1994, he won the Nobel Prize for his contribution to world economic theory. In between these dramatic tentpoles, his life was a daily struggle...
Drug Traffic off Florida Spikes as US Turns Its Focus to Terrorism ; Shift of Antidrug Resources to Guard against Terrorists Has Increased the Boldness of Narcotics Trafficking
When the Caribbean became a superhighway for drug trafficking in the 1980s, it became the inspiration for a TV show - "Miami Vice." Today, the azure waters of Florida are once again threatening to become a major artery in the narcotics trade. As US antidrug...
E Pluribus Euro
Out of many nations, one currency. That's not exactly a motto to rival e pluribus unum (out of many, one), which is stamped on every new American coin. But it's one succinct way to explain the historic wonder of 300 million people in 12 nations embracing...
Farm Subsidies Prop Up Midwest Land Values
Farmland prices are rising to levels not seen for 20 years in the United States. Never mind that crop prices have fallen precipitously. Or that the last time land values were this high, American agriculture hit its worst slump since the Great Depression....
Getting Food to Kabul's Masses ; Finding Enough Food to Feed Afghanistan's Deprived People Is Tough Enough. but There's Corruption, Too
Mohammed Yusef once was a farmer. And Nazir Ahmad was a tailor. But today, they have one thing in common. They have been reduced to waiting in the courtyard of a war-tattered high school for eight hours hoping to get a 50-kilogram portion of wheat to...
Help for Survivors of Afghanistan's Land Mines
Gul Afzal is making a banana milkshake, carefully. Balanced on his prosthetic leg, he is using his other to pedal a specially designed bicycle, which runs a system of pulleys and gears to power a blender. The system also spins a stone for sharpening...
Holding out Hope for India and Pakistan
In December 1959, I covered President Eisenhower's trip to India, part of a swing through 11 countries. Eisenhower was a big hit in India. His flower-showered arrival in New Delhi was India TV's first live event. A crowd of a million massed in the New...
In 2002, Sports Will Go Global
What a year 2001 was in sports: Lance Armstrong won his third consecutive Tour de France. Barry Bonds broke the all-time baseball home run record with 73 in a single season. The Williams sisters faced off in the US Open tennis finals, with Venus dominating...
Lessons Learned from Son No. 1
I am the single father of two boys - both of whom I adopted from abroad. Alyosha arrived eight years ago, from Russia, at the age of 7. Anton, a tender 5-1/2-year-old, has been here only a few weeks. I brought him home from deep inside Ukraine. It is...
Movie Guide
Ratings and comments by David Sterritt and Monitor staff Staff comments reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs, sex/nudity, and profanity is compiled by the Monitor panel. STAR RATINGS ...
Much More Than Giant Stone Heads ; from Micro to Macro, a New Exhibition Captures the Enigma of Easter Island Art
The title, "Splendid Isolation: Art of Easter Island," expresses one well-known and one little-known element of Easter Island art. Images of the island's colossal stone heads are not just well- known worldwide but iconic. Over the course of a millennium,...
New Year, New Laws: Watch It with That Burger! ; across the US, Local Codes Deal with Moldy Homes, Date-Rape Drugs, and Kids - or Even Hamburgers - in Cars
Pennsylvania drivers who carry loaded paintball guns are now outside the law. South Carolinians who like to dress up as sheriff will now serve jail time, if caught. And citizens who eat a burger while driving will drive police around the bend in North...
On Screen She Beams, but off She Likes Her Anonymity
When I started acting school," Cate Blanchett confides, "my grandmother told me, 'When you're performing - always keep your headlights on. But when you're home, turn them off.' " The award-winning Australian star has followed that advice to the letter....
Paris Plans Bold New Home for Art on the Seine
The world's most visited capital will boast yet another must-see attraction, after one of France's richest men unveiled plans for a modern art museum that promises to be Europe's boldest cultural project since Bilbao's Guggenheim and London's Tate Modern....
Real People Real Music ; the 'O Brother' Soundtrack Created a Roots-Music Buzz, but Its Appeal Was Building Well before That
When a guest on her radio show played an Alison Krauss tune, Susie Barbour fell in love with the bluegrass/country/pop singer and fiddler. Learning that Krauss had recorded the Beatles and Todd Rundgren, Barbour ran to the record store. Then she heard...
Russia Remains Skeptical of Paperless Disarmament ; Moscow Hopes for a New Document This Year to Replace the Discarded ABM Treaty
Russia's relations with the US are warmer than at any time since World War II, but experts here are warning that the new partnership could easily founder upon a piece of paper - or the lack of one. As Washington sketches out its terms for a new world...
Should Uncle Sam Pay Victim Compensation to 9/11 Families?
The debate about how to distribute the federal subsidies to survivors of those murdered in the Sept. 11 attack cannot be resolved, because the wrong question is being asked. Those who favor dividing the federal money equally among the families and those...
The Writer's Paradise, Lost
"Death of literature? Not just yet" was the title of an article in this paper that I read with savage indignation and some amusement. Literature kaput and defunct? Of course it is. Dead's-a- doornail is the Down East expression, out like a light, see-ya-...
US Forces Tackle Riskier Tasks in Afghanistan ; as America's Interests Diverge from Local Warlords, US Troops Shoulder More Duties
America may be on the verge of the most dangerous phase of the war in Afghanistan - shifting toward having its own military personnel take on high-risk operations, rather than relying heavily on Afghan proxy troops. The reason for the change: The interests...