The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 17, 2002

A Reluctant Empire Stretches More ; as the US Begins to Establish Semi-Permanent Bases in Central Asia, Troops Are Now Deploying in the Philippines
As a candidate, George W. Bush criticized President Clinton for overextending the military. Bush promised that, if elected, he would review US commitments around the world, with an eye towards bringing as many troops home as possible. Yet today the US...
Aussie Who Threw Tact Aside Leaves Politics
During the past five years as Australia's conservative firebrand, Pauline Hanson has never won over more than a sliver of voters. But as she stepped down as head of the One Nation Party on Monday, there was an overwhelming consensus among political observers...
A Vision for India-Pakistan Collaboration
With troops massed at the India-Pakistan border, and communication and travel between the two nations frozen, we are reminded of the perpetual possibility of armed conflict between these nuclear-armed neighbors. Rich in culture and resources, and the...
Business & Finance
The world's largest airline company, AMR Corp., reported a record fourth-quarter loss of $798 million, calling the post-Sept. 11 months "incredibly difficult." AMR, which operates American and TWA, said its loss for all of 2001 was $1.76 billion, compared...
Calling All Snack Cops
At a press conference yesterday in Washington, Attorney General John Ashcroft delivered this statement in response to the growing concern surrounding the president's episode with a pretzel: "As we pursue our investigation into the Pretzel-gate crisis,...
Computer? What Computer?
During a recent visit to some friends, their teenage son excused himself by saying that he needed to talk to some of his classmates about homework. He stood up, walked into the next room, and turned on the family computer. "You said you needed to talk...
Dueling Philosophers ; the Implications of This 10-Minute Clash Still Reverberate
On October 25th, 1946, the Moral Science Club, a weekly discussion group of philosophy dons and students, met at King's College, Cambridge. The speaker, Karl Popper, had come down from London to deliver a paper entitled, "Are There Philosophical Problems?"...
Earth in the Balance - Could Tilt Either Way
Life on Earth stands at a significant crossroad. Over the past 10,000 years, Homo sapiens have been wildly successful, colonizing continents, defeating a great proportion of natural enemies, and replacing forests, grasslands, and swamps with agricultural...
Fate of 'Detainees' Hangs on US Wording ; Are Afghan Captives POWs? US Terminology May Allow for Special Military Tribunals
The future of the Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters being held in Cuba is as unclear as the view through the darkened goggles they were made to wear when they stepped off the plane at the US military base in Guantanamo Bay. Already, Washington's refusal...
Filmmakers Flock to Prague for a Cheap Hollywood
David Listvan clung to the bars blocking the stairwell of the Titanic, while the people around him shouted for help. Suddenly, a frothing wave swept them all down the stairs and into darkness. "We had a great time," Mr. Listvan recalls, as he sips a...
Hunt for Al Qaeda Intensifies ; the US Dropped about 100 Additional Special Forces into Eastern Afghanistan Yesterday
About 85 US Marines in light-brown camouflage and 15 other Western fighters clothed in black leapt from helicopters onto the bumpy tarmac of the Khost airport yesterday. And Afghanistan's minister for frontier and tribal affairs announced an imminent...
I Discover a Way to Repay Forgiveness
I am crying emphatically in the middle of a parking lot in the shadow of a mountain in northeastern Japan. A pregnant woman stands next to me, expressing alarm in Japanese. Having arrived in this mountain town three days ago from my native United States...
John Walker, Hapless Seeker?
Most Americans see him as simply a traitor. His mother says he was brainwashed into joining a jihad. President Bush calls him "this poor fellow," a young man who's "obviously ... been misled." He himself told CNN that his "heart" became attached to the...
Latest War Technology: Useful, but Limited ; New Military Gadgetry Is a Success, but the War Reveals Gaps in Intelligence Gathering
As US military forces pursue terrorists beyond Afghanistan, the campaign to track down Al Qaeda and Taliban holdouts offers initial lessons on the challenges for America's military in waging unconventional war against shadowy targets. Afghanistan, on...
Letters
All Enron roads lead to campaign-finance reform Regarding "Environment tussles return after national pall" (Jan. 10): Whether or not the Bush administration's relationship with Enron turns out to be a legal quagmire for the White House remains to be...
Monitor Breakfast: Mitchell Daniels ; Selected Quotations from a Monitor Breakfast with Office of Management and Budget Director Mitchell Daniels
On Bush administration budget priorities: "What this finally comes down to, really, is how much priority one attaches to debt reduction. At the bottom, that is what it all comes down to. And this administration places a high priority on that. That is...
Mugabe's Grip Tightens on Elections ; as Zimbabwe's Parliament Outlaws Opposition; Europe and US Mull Sanctions
Zimbabwe was once considered one of Africa's great post-colonial success stories, held up as a model for peaceful transition to democracy and sound economic policy. But 22 years after independence, as the country heads toward March elections, Zimbabwe...
'Normal' May Be Just around the Corner
For weeks after Sept. 11, people wondered how long it would take for the United States to get back to normal. How long before humor would be OK again? How long until the media would slip back into their old, Condit-chasing ways? Or would they? The answer...
Rail's Future Nears a Switch
Amtrak had a brief resurgence last year as the Sept. 11 attack decreased air travel and more people took the trains. But ridership was still down by a few percentage points in the closing months of 2001. The passenger rail system's biggest challenge,...
So You'd like to Learn Arabic. Got a Decade or So?
Early last fall, FBI Director Robert Mueller made a public plea for Arabic, Farsi, and Pashto translators. Many Americans, eager to do their part in the war against terrorism, scurried to sign up for language classes. With more than 20,000 applicants...
Tax Cut Revisited as Red Ink Returns
It was 1982, Year 2 of the Ronald Reagan tax cut. Republican Sen. Bob Dole, watching federal budget deficits grow like Kansas wheat, urged his colleagues to pass a measure that essentially undid much of the cut they had approved the year before. "Call...
The Feminine Mystique ; Artemisia Gentileschi Takes on Male Chauvinist Pigs in the 17th Century
In 1999, Susan Vreeland published a haunting little novel about a Vermeer painting. "Girl in Hyacinth Blue" joined several other fine Vermeer novels that happened to come out at the same time, and it's hung on the paperback bestseller list ever since....
The Honorable Judge Cowgirl ; Justice Sandra Day O'Connor Started off Down on the Farm
Would you like to read a book in which, to quote the publisher, "The first female justice of the US Supreme Court describes her experiences growing up on a cattle ranch in the American Southwest, and how the land, people, and values shaped her"? I would,...
The Sacred Art of the Written Word
To the Western mind, writing is merely a method of verbal communication, and calligraphy is a footnote to art. But in the Muslim world, where there is no tradition of portraiture or sculpture, calligraphy is primordial, characteristic, and sacred - arguably...
Tragedies Renew Focus on Helping Teens ; Lessons Learned from Events Such as Tuesday's School Shooting Could Also Be Applied to Younger Children
A teenager in New York walks into a high school and seriously wounds two other students. Five high schoolers characterized as "the outcasts of the outcasts" in a quiet New Jersey suburb allegedly beat and sexually assault a 13-year-old girl. And in Florida,...
Upended, Not Unpleasantly
This bachelor uncle lives by himself in a cozy New York City apartment. Gregarious and sharing outside the apartment, inside he is spoiled and selfish, doing exactly what he wants when he wants, like planning his own meals, listening to music he chooses,...
USA
John Walker Lindh, captured while fighting with Al Qaeda forces in Afghanistan, faced a trial in a civilian court on federal charges of conspiracy to kill US nationals. If convicted, he could be sentenced to prison for life. Court records filed by the...
Vast Cave Network Picked Clean ; US Hunt Is Moving on to More Caves in the Region; One Governor Lists Three Al Qaeda Hideouts
The shattered gates of the Zawar Kili base are reached after passing dozens of caves - most of their entrances blasted shut by US Daisy Cutter bombs. Ammunition, land mines, and papers are strewn across the dusty terrain. One document gives permission...
Walker Case Hinges on His Prior Statements ; Justice Department Charges Captured US Citizen with Conspiracy to Kill Americans, but So Far Not with Treason
For John Walker Lindh, the so-called "American Taliban," the biggest foe he may have to overcome in the courtroom is himself. Prosecutors are likely to build much of their conspiracy case against against the California native using testimony he provided...
Warning to States on Funding Faith-Based Charities
As George W. Bush heads into year two of his presidency, one question mark is whether "compassionate conservatism" - a cornerstone of his campaign and early months in office - will hold its own against the war on terrorism and the bid for economic recovery....
Whose Idea Is It, Anyway? 'Bounty Hunters' Track the Validity of Patents ; Patents Have Been Essential to Ensuring Innovation. but the US May Be Fencing Itself in by Putting Too Many New Developments under Patent Protection
It's a case that anyone who has ever struggled for possession of the TV remote could relate to. Universal Electronics, a company based in Cypress, Calif., holds a patent on a multipurpose remote-control device - something that can program several electronic...
World
A man believed to be a senior Al Qaeda finance official was being questioned by US forces in southern Afghanistan after reports said he turned up unexpectedly at Kandahar airport, where hundreds of suspected Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters are being detained....