The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 12, 2000

A Dominant Dollar Buoys US Consumers ; Strong Currency Makes Trips to the Eiffel Tower Cheaper, but Boosts Trade Deficit
Despite a mammoth trade deficit and a wild stock market, the US dollar reigns as the king of currencies. Now at its strongest level in 14 years, the dollar is giving a boost to many Americans, from those planning summer trips to Europe to consumers...
Budapest and Beyond: FBI Goes Global ; in First Such Project, US Agents Work with Police in Hungary on International Crime Cases
It gives globalization a whole new meaning. A team of agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation began working side by side with Hungarian police in Budapest this past week. Their main mission: to go after Russian mafia gangs who are using this...
Cats from 'Away,' and One Close to Home
Probably the word started with English sailors and came to America with the Mayflower. The "ratlines" were the foot-ropes the crew stood on aloft while working sail, each paired with a hand- rope, or man-rope, to which the sailors clung for dear life,...
Clinton's Exit, Putin's Entrance - an Odd Summit Balance
Vladimir Putin has started his elected term as president. Bill Clinton is near the end of his. And once again, the lame duck problem threatens to bedevil the conduct of American foreign policy.In May 1960, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev closed down...
Dutch Museum Spends Big on 200th
How does one of the world's preeminent museums celebrate an occasion as impressive as a 200th anniversary? At the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, there are two answers: first, by honoring the past with a major exhibit of 17th-century Dutch art, a period known...
Ed Knows; If Only He Would Tell Me
Ed is the Vizier of Brook Trout in our small town in Maine. And now that the water level is high with spring runoff, the beaver-dam flowage is swollen, the brooks are running as the ice in the lakes dissipates, and the water temperature is inching upward...
Eyes on a Silicon Jackpot ; Both GOP and Dems Curry High-Tech - and Its Money
Both the Republican and Democratic parties are competing to be seen as sole champion of the high-tech industry. They want the political luster and campaign lucre that may come from being protector of a dotcom economy. The latest example is the GOP's...
Filmmakers Frame Stories around Family Struggles
A first-rate film festival needs two ingredients: new movies by world-class directors, and an underlying theme that ties the program together. This year's just-concluded San Francisco International Film Festival had both, reconfirming its status as...
Films Make Still Photos Come to Life
At a time when digital video, interactive media, and other high- tech innovations fill the news, it's refreshing to know that some dedicated artists are loyal to old-fashioned methods, filling screens with the richly detailed images and finely tuned...
Finally, I Feel at Home ; Originally Printed as an Article in the Christian Science Sentinel
An experience i had recently showed me what home really is. For a couple of years, I didn't have a permanent place to live, and never really felt at home. I always had good lodging, but something was lacking. What, I asked myself, was I looking for?...
High Tech Often Wins on the Hill ; Microsoft Case Aside, Both Parties Woo the Industry
Republicans and Democrats fight about everything from taxes to trade, but even in today's hyper-partisan era there's one issue they often cooperate on: high tech. This week's lopsided House vote to extend the ban on e-commerce taxes is a case in point....
London's New Mayor Stirs Lively Racial Debate ; This Week, 'Red Ken,' Who Rode Minority Vote to Victory, Appointed Radical Activists as Advisers on Race and Police
London's first directly elected mayor has made a career as a maverick who never shies away from controversy. Quite the opposite, in fact. So it comes as little surprise that Ken Livingstone, nicknamed "Red Ken" for his socialist views, wasted no time...
Marching Moms Come from All Walks of Life
Cheryl Reynolds has never lost a friend to gun violence. A lifelong Republican in a middle-class neighborhood of Boise, Idaho, she lives in some of the most gun-friendly territory in the nation. She has never protested anything in her life. But for...
Micro and Soft: They Go Together
My heart goes out to billionaire Bill Gates as he battles to preserve the unity of his corporation. The US Justice Department and 17 states are trying to get a judge to separate the Windows operating system from Microsoft's office applications. Preparing...
Music That's Off-Key
America's strong love of music has created a $15 billion industry. But its has also created an unhappy melody among both sellers and consumers. On Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that the nation's five largest music distributors...
On Neutral Ground, Rebels Face Indonesian Government ; Guerrilla and Jakarta Representatives Meet in Geneva Today to Pledge for Peace
Guerrilla rebels in Indonesia's westernmost province of Aceh returned to their camps last night, hopeful that today's peace talks in Geneva would offer some respite from a 25-year civil war that has left more than 5,000 dead. The two sides are to meet...
Self-Defense Spurs the Second Amendment Sisters
Juli Bednarzyk, a software consultant in Plainfield, Ill., grows animated as she describes the imaginary assault. "From one end of the room to the other, it only takes an attacker about two seconds to get [to you]," she says. "I don't think I can take...
Sierra Leone's People Take Flight ; as Fighting Erupted throughout the Country This Week, Thousands of People Trudged toward Freetown
Reports of rebel attacks just 18 miles from Freetown have provoked thousands of people to flee their homes and move toward Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown, in columns that stretched for as far as the eye can see. "People say the rebels are coming,"...
Singer Begins to Rock Acting Boat ; Interview / Jon Bon Jovi
Jon Bon Jovi may be a wizened elder of the rock scene, but when it comes to acting he says he feels 21 again. "With acting, I've learned humility," says the budding thespian, his long, modish hair styling him every bit the rocker. "I'm learning a new...
Sports 101
On Monday night, brothers Jason and Jeremy Giambi of the Oakland A's made history. They hit home runs in the same game and joined an elite list of a few brothers to accomplish such a rare feat. Long before the Giambis came other famous brothers like...
The Monitor Movie Guide
Red stars denote the reviews of Monitor movie critic David Sterritt unless otherwise noted. Ratings and comments by the Monitor panel ( blue stars) reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs,...
The Return of Wind Turbines and Solar Cells ; after a Decade of Sluggishness, Renewable Energy Gets a Second Wind as States Promote Fossil-Fuel Alternatives
If you think "green power" went the way of "flower power," think again. Alternative energy is making a sudden comeback. After a decade-long lapse in interest and funding, efforts to find alternatives to fossil-fuel energy have reignited from Massachusetts...
Today's Story Line
If crime is going global, so must the FBI. The G-men are taking their international operations to a new level: US agents are now permanently based in Hungary to fight the Russian mafia. For the first time in 25 years, Indonesia's government is scheduled...
USA
The House voted 352 to 75 to extend to 2006 a moratorium on taxing Internet access charges. The measure is aimed at encouraging the growth of e-commerce, but state and local officials have argued it deprives them of an important source of revenue. The...
Usually-Fluffy TV Digs a Bit Deeper ; 'Jesus' and 'Decalogue' Investigate Christianity and Its Call for Moral Choices
Selling products is the point of most television, so most programming is fluffy on purpose - meant to distract rather than enlighten. But creative imaginations are at work in TV, too. And despite the rampant amorality of most situation comedies, the...
Utah Shadowboxes with 'Fight Club' Phenomenon ; A Clandestine Boxing Club Based on the Film Draws the Attention of Lawmakers and Shocks Conservative State
Its recent missive, blinking from an untended Web site, sounded like something from a summer-camp brochure: "Where friends once gathered to enjoy each other's company in a new, wholesome way," it began. But this was no gather-around-the-campfire kind...
What Does It All Mean? ; from Films to TV to Exhibitions, the Arts Explore the Big 'Whys' of Life
The movie, "The Straight Story," an elderly man drives a lawn mower across two states in six weeks to make peace with his long- estranged brother. Along the way, he aids several people with his wisdom and confidence. The lawn mower drive seems eccentric....
What's on TV ; Listings Are Not Necessarily Recommended by the Monitor. All Times Eastern, Check Local Listings
SATURDAY 5/13 Miracle in Lane Two (Disney Channel, 7:30-9 p.m.): Frankie Muniz stars as Justin Yoder, the 12-year-old who made a name for himself in a soap-box derby - despite his wheelchair. The cheerful film can be sentimental, but the humor mitigates...
When Marital Woes Spill onto Campaign Stage
It is a politician's dread: a private life laid out in tabloid fashion. Perhaps a marriage dissected, an extramarital relationship exposed, the D-word - divorce - bandied about. Suddenly, like a National Enquirer delivery truck gone wild, all this has...
Who's the Best-Ever Behind the Mike? Classy Jim McKay
It's a quixotic relationship we have with television sportscasters. It can be more like family than anything else. That means we sometimes listen closely to them and other times not; that we get aggravated with their quirks and their phrases (Marv Albert...
Women Are Not Victims of a Wage Gap
Marilyn Gardner's May 10 column, "Fair pay is fair play," propagates a distorted view of the gender pay "gap" - a statistic which attempts to make women feel victimized by sexism and discrimination in the workplace. The gender-pay gap is simply the...
World
The proposed US national missile-defense shield would neutralize China's nuclear weapons arsenal and possibly force the Beijing government "to increase the number of our warheads," its chief arms- control official warned. Sha Zukang said his government...