The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 6, 2001

A Job No One Wants: Leading Japan ; Backroom Politicians Stumble for a Solution to a Disliked Prime Minister
In most places, it's a basic law of the political jungle: when a leader looks weak, it isn't long before another steps in to take the reins. In Japan, however, many politicians seem less concerned with filling the power vacuum than they are with...
All She Wants to Do Is MUSH ; Ever since She Was 7, She Wanted to Race Sled Dogs. Now the Teen Is Happily Living Her Dream
Liz Bailey hates summer. That's because she loves to "mush" - race her four-dog team over the snow. It's an unusual hobby for a 13-year-old, but she's been doing it since she was 11. And she dreamed of racing dogs for four years before that. Liz...
A Stormy Finale to a Winter of Quirky Weather
With the arrival of the monster snowstorm that has closed countless shops and schools along the entire Eastern Seaboard, this most peculiar of American winters took another unusual turn. After years of mild winters - among the warmest in a century...
Between Classes, We Fight Fires and Help Operate the College
I was eating lunch in the cafeteria when the siren went off. I jumped up and dashed outside as the truck pulled up. My classmates and I clambered on, and the truck roared off. Twenty minutes later, I was raking a fire line on the side of a mountain,...
Budget Cuts Could Clip NASA's Wings ; Current Figures Would Force Agency to Scale Back Space Station Plans
New US astronauts eager to "kick the tires and light the fires" may find that their best chance to soar, at least in the near future, comes when they board airliners for public-speaking tours. That is one implication of the new spending plan the White...
Candle-Lit Memories of Stalin ; While Older Georgians Recall 'Glory Days,' Young Have New Ideas
Say the word "Stalin" anywhere else in the world, and the reaction is likely to be abhorrence about the ruthless Soviet leader whose regime killed at least 20 million of its own people. But nostalgia for the glory days of the Soviet Union is growing...
Clinton's Endless Exit
I wrote my "goodbye" to President Clinton as I left for a Florida vacation a few weeks ago. But now that I've come back, I find he's still here, an ex-president on center stage. So here we have Bill Clinton, still surrounded by controversy, still ...
EU Gives Marlboro Man Marching Orders ; the EU Last Week Said Cigarette Packs Must Display Blunt Warnings, Perhaps Color Photos of Illness
From its headquarters in Brussels, the European Union is sending a message to the Marlboro Man: "This town ain't big enough for the both of us." In its latest showdown with the tobacco industry, the 15-member union has drafted tough new rules that...
For Now, Lobbyists Play by Bush's Rules
It didn't take Earl Pomeroy long to figure out that the Bush tax cut was on a fast track through the House - with big-time lobby power behind it. Phone calls and e-mails asking the North Dakota Democrat to send a big part of the surplus back to...
Keep Snowmobiles out of Yellowstone
Regarding your Feb. 21 article "Snowmobile buzz echoes in White House": I would implore President Bush to urgently consider leaving the snowmobile ban in place to help preserve the serenity of the Yellowstone National Park, and keep it free from unnecessary...
Le Carre Novel Spooks Kenyanbooksellers
If you want to buy the new novel by bestselling author John Le Carre in Kenya, you'll need a secret Swahili password to get it. "The Constant Gardener" is so controversial here that most bookshops are afraid to sell it. It takes the whispered phrase...
Natural Gas in High Demand, Low Supply ; as Prices Soar, Washington Considers Increased Drilling and an Alaska Pipeline
For all the right reasons, American consumers and power companies in recent years made natural gas their fuel of choice. It's clean- burning, it's efficient, and suppliers say there is plenty in the ground, too. But at a time when 70 percent of new...
New Airing for Old Grievances about Southwest Land ; the US Is Studying Whether to Pay Reparations to Mexican Descendants for 'Stolen' Tracts of Property
On the dingy main road through Tierra Amarilla, a minuscule town in the mountains of northern New Mexico, is a collapsed adobe house. Nearby is a pile of rubble that was once the foundation of a second house. A defunct stucco service station is at...
Partners in Pedagogy
Collaborations between higher education and K-12 public education are hardly a new idea. They've existed in various parts of the United States and in various forms for decades. But Education Secretary Rod Paige recognizes they are a good idea ripe...
Standing out Blending in ; A Pioneer Group of College Scholarship Students Reflect on Adjustment and Success during Their First Year Away
In so many ways, their ride on the first-semester-of-college roller coaster was just like everyone else's: The struggles to understand "professor speak." The sweet taste of freedom mixed with a bitter tinge at the thought of missing the Sunday family...
Thai Politics on Colombian Path? ; Drug Lords, Business Rivals Are among Suspects in Saturday's Apparent Attack on Prime Minister
A full-scale investigation is under way here to determine what or who was behind the apparent assassination attempt on Thailand's new prime minister. Yesterday, Thaksin Shinawatra tried to play down the impact of the attack, which has raised questions...
Timeout on Arms Treaties
It's time to take a timeout on nuclear arms- control treaties. They are too slow and too timid. For instance, we started negotiating the START II Treaty in 1991, and it is not yet even ratified. Besides, new treaties are simply not needed to get where...
Unveiling a Dark Chapter in Cambodia's Past ; an Update for Cambodian High School Textbooks Stirs Debate on How Best to Teach about the Violent Rule of the Khmer Rouge
Teachers around the globe have long struggled with how to answer thorny questions from their students about such issues as race and religion - often opting to sidestep them altogether. In some nations, though, students can pose an even more- sensitive...
Your Work, or the Web's? ; Schools Ramp Up Efforts to Prevent Internet-Based Plagiarizing
When Jeanne Wilson's 10-year-old son gets stuck in his computer game, he doesn't have to spend hours rethinking strategies or plotting a new course. Instead, he turns to the Internet, where he quickly finds tips - otherwise known as "cheats." Most...