The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 8, 2001

Adding Up Zero Tolerance
Tougher discipline in public schools expanded rapidly in the mid- 1990s after Congress passed the Gun-Free Schools Act. It was cemented in place by a series of school shootings in the late '90s, particularly the rampage at Columbine High School in...
A Little Snail Makes a Big Splash
I first glimpsed Mr. Mossy, a walnut-sized apple snail, cruising the waters while I was tediously dealing with the day's mound of laundry. Yanking open my son's chest of drawers to drop in one more warm load of freshly folded T-shirts and jeans, I...
Amid Pines, a Model for Growth ; in California's Sierra Nevada, Where the Population Is Booming, an Unusual Coalition Works to Preserve the Region's Sense of Place
There are no retail franchises or fast-food chains in this historic Sierra Nevada mountain town, and Leea Davis wants to keep it that way. "We want to take care of this place so that it doesn't become just like every other place," says the curio shop...
A Rough Ride through Water and Memory
Australia is hot. Just a month after Peter Carey's "True History of the Kelly Gang," here comes another even more searing exploration of the land Down Under. There shouldn't be much suspense in a book called "Death of a River Guide," but the quickened...
Bush's Risky Tax-Cut Power Play ; Show of Strength Could Prove Canny, Letting Compromise Come Later. but He May Lose Senate Democrats' Support
Democratic congressman John Tanner had been looking forward to working with George W. Bush - even more so than with Bill Clinton. The representative from Tennessee liked President Bush's talk about changing the tone in Washington and working across...
California: Don't Forget History
Even though the threat of rolling blackouts has faded in California, we continue to face a greater danger: that a desperate craving for electricity will cloud our better judgment. Along with long-term electricity contracts announced this week to stabilize...
Competence Overrides Race in St. Louis Election ; Mayoral Primary This Week Shows Color of Candidates Isn't Voters' Top Consideration
Warning to mayors of America's racially polarized cities: Competence matters. Don't deliver on campaign promises, and voters will eventually throw you out, no matter what the color of your skin. That's the lesson, at least, from this week's primary...
Dear Secretary Powell:
From everything I've read and heard, you - like many people with direct experience of war - have a strong aversion to indecisive, long-drawn-out battles. That aversion seems wise. But I would like to hear more about the alternatives you and President...
Etc
WHADDYA MEAN, CHANGE IT? Cartier v. Cartier: Sounds like an intra-family lawsuit, right? Not in this case. The party of the first part is the 142-year-old, internationally famous seller of fine jewelry. The other: a Duluth, Minn., insurance agency...
Fair Play
The news flash: Another shooting at a US high school. This time, a suburb of San Diego. It cuts the heart. No matter the location, schoolyard rampages are too troubling for distance to make them far away. Like many, I have thought long and hard...
Frontier Clash Pits Cattlemen against Guerrillas ; Colombia's Long Civil War Spills over the Border onto Venezuelan Ranches
When Hector Arriaga's modest cattle ranch was invaded by squatters in late 1999, he was stunned as well as angry. Just a month earlier he had paid the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC - Colombia's biggest guerrilla group) more than $700...
Honoring Women in Our Lives ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Almost everyone has had at least one woman in his or her life who has made a difference. A mother, an aunt, a sister, a teacher. The theme of National Women's History Month this year is "women of courage and vision," and March is designated as a time...
In Virginia, a Pledge to Teach Patriotism
The sound of children's voices saying the Pledge of Allegiance in their classrooms each day is an American tradition. Or is it? Concern that students are no longer reciting the 31-word pledge at school is stirring a debate in some states over whether...
Kennedy's George Bows out Gracefully
George's farewell issue arrived on newsstands March 1, offering a list of the 50 most powerful people in politics. But news that Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan is in control is not what makes the issue memorable - it's the features looking back at the...
Lost in the World of a Bird of Prey
In the past 30 years, New England salt marshes have sprouted a curious crop of isolated phone poles. Oftentimes the poles are crowned with massive rafts of bleached sticks. If you approach one of these poles in early summer, a big black-and-white...
Mexican Broadcasters Take 'Narco-Ballads' off the Air ; A Massacre Last Month Prompted a Self-Imposed Ban on Drug Songs by Radio Stations
Do violent lyrics in popular music foment violence? Do songs about illegal drugs glorify the drug trade and turn traffickers into heroes? Those might sound like questions for American rapper Eminem. But they're being asked in Mexico, where a surge...
Multilingual Montreal and the New Tongues of the Net
Everyone knows that the language of the Internet is overwhelmingly English. But people like Claude Lemay, president and chief executive of Alis Technologies, know that the growth potential of the Internet is overwhelmingly in languages other than...
New Rules, New Norms for People and Dogs
This city is no stranger to urban crime. But the image that peers from behind a metal cage these days, arousing outrage here and beyond, is the face of a dog named Hera. Hera and her companion Bane mauled to death a San Francisco woman in the hall...
One Woman's Crusadeto Make the World Safer
Mary Ann Glendon takes the title of her latest book from the conclusion of Eleanor Roosevelt's nightly prayer: "Save us from ourselves and show us a vision of a world made new." There is the irony of the quest for human rights: The worst enemies...
Piecing Together Our Shared Past
"I have no past," my nephew Jacob announces. At age 7, he is the youngest relative seated at my dining-room table. We are putting together a 500-piece jigsaw puzzle and reminiscing. While Jacob helps me hunt for corner pieces, my daughter Sarah talks...
Russia Trial: Sea Change or Spin? ; Critics Question Whether Officer Trial That Began Last Week Proves Concern for Chechen Human Rights
From a distance, Russia may appear to be turning over a new leaf on human rights abuses in Chechnya - where Moscow's harsh tactics have long put it at odds with the West. Col. Yuri Budanov, a tank commander accused of murdering a Chechen woman,...
Seeking Backcountry Thrills, Skiers Find Avalanches ; an Unstable Snowpack and More People Venturing outside of Resort Safety Have Led to 27 Deaths This Winter
In downtown Bozeman, Mont., the flashing blue light set atop the old Bozeman Hotel has long been a beacon for alpine skiers. Whenever the bulb flickers like a siren beam, it means a significant amount of fresh snow has fallen miles away in the Bridger...
Splashdown! ; to Steer the Falling MIR Space Station Safely Back to Earth, Russia and the US Are Undertaking a Crash Course in Cooperation
To Russia, it's a symbol of national accomplishment. To Astronaut Shannon Lucid, it's an orbital home "resembling a cosmic tumbleweed" where Russian and American crews discovered their common humanity. To NASA, it's a relic that drains funds from Russia's...
Stop Complaining about the Weather - It's Better Than Ever
If you think the weather is crazy now, be glad it isn't normal. Agriculture, civilization, and the lifestyles we now take for granted developed during 10 millenniums of unusual climatic calm. Greenland's glaciers and other geophysical records tell...
The Bestsellers
4 59 WHO MOVED MY CHEESE? by Spencer Johnson, Putnam, $19.95 Using a children's book style, Johnson tells the story of two mice, two mini-men, and their never-ending search for cheese. The cheese represents the things people want out of life, and...
The Watch Dogs Need Closer Watching
It's a strange thing about journalism: Many, probably most non- journalists say they distrust the news media. Yet most of what those same non-journalists believe about their county, state, nation, and other nations comes from - you guessed it - the...
Today's Story Line:
Clara Zetkin would be proud - and, probably concerned by the work left to do. Started in 1910, to honor a German Marxist who campaigned on behalf of women factory workers, International Women's Day now comes in as many forms as there are nationalities....
USA
Classes resumed at Santana High School in Santee, Calif., two days after the shooting incident on campus that killed two students and wounded 13 others. Three students remained hospitalized. The Los Angeles Times reported that freshman Charles Williams,...
US Aid Groups No Longer Stand Quietly By
FEATURES, IDEAS The world has watched in distress for more than two years as outbreaks of deadly violence - often between Christians and Muslims - threaten the future of newly democratic Indonesia. An increasingly fragile government, though committed...
Women-Only Prize Honors Peacemakers
While working to promote human rights in Pakistan, Asma Jahangir and Hina Jilani have been arrested, abused, and even had attempts made on their lives. A continent away, Flora Brovina spent 19 months in jail for founding the Albanian Women's League...
Women's Day in Russia: Showers of Flowers ; March 8 Became a Tradition Here, like Valentine's Day. Women Now Want More
Today, women here will be showered with flowers, chocolates, and "aren't you lovely" from their menfolk to celebrate what became a tradition in Soviet times - International Women's Day. But for women today, that just doesn't cut it. They say they've...
Work-Safety Rules Fall in Post-Clinton Era ; with GOP in Control, Congress Is Undoing a Major Labor-Union Victory
Congressional repeal of workplace-injury rules issued in the final months of President Clinton's term in office would mark a major turning point in one of the longest-running, most contentious regulatory efforts ever undertaken by the federal government....
World
Direct elections for prime minister were abolished by Israel's parliament, a move that was seen as giving incoming government head Ariel Sharon increased stability and his broad-based coalition a lengthier life- span. But a cloud still hung over his...