The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 26, 1995

An Unspoken Friendship
When I look again at Katie through my mind's eye, it opens wide and doesn't blink. That's how it was, I'm afraid. My sisters and I stared at her. She looked unlike anyone I'd seen in my short life. Back then I rarely saw women her age wear slacks,...
A Paper Pact Meets a Cold Reality in West Bank NEW ISRAELI-PLO DEAL
ON paper, at least, the latest pact between Israel and Palestinians leaders advances the trust between former enemies. But in this usually bustling Palestinian commercial center, one of seven West Bank towns due to come under Palestinian self-rule,...
Are You Struggling with Discouragement?
HAS there ever been a time when you felt that there was no use in going on, that you'd done everything you could do, to no avail, and you might just as well lie down and quit? In other words, "Stop the world, I want to get off." Well, you're not...
Business Books in Brief
Managing Generation X: How to Bring Out the Best in Young Talent, by Bruce Tulgan (Merritt Publishing, 243 pp., $19.95). "Managing Generation X" is practical, insightful reading for any manager who works with this group of Americans born between 1963...
CD-ROMs Make Learning History Fun, Interactive
Sometime between the Bronze Age and the Age of the CD-ROM, I slogged through fifth grade. Back then, we learned history from a textbook - the one with the colorful conquistadors on the front. Unfortunately, as every fifth-grader knew, the textbook...
Cosmic Rays Create Dazzling Mystery Two Stunning 'Events' Whose Origin Cannot Be Explained Lead Physicists to Design Project for Northern, Southern Hemispheres
Imagine you are a scientist and in the course of your work you suddenly observe something that defies everything you know about the laws of physics. That is where cosmic ray researcher Eugene Lowe found himself four years ago. "It was like coming...
Gingrich and the 'Someone Else' Urge
A PUBLIC desire for change drove the last presidential election and the congressional elections of 1994. This voter dissatisfaction with the status quo is still at work. It's evident in the widespread unhappiness with the president and with those ...
Hard to Turn Back
ISRAEL took six days to capture the West Bank; 28 years to return just its towns to Palestinian control. In exchange for that partial return, Israel gets something less than uninterrupted peace. But the essential meaning of the agreement Yasser Arafat...
How Astronomers Were Fooled by the Einstein Effect
Sometimes astronomers may feel caught in a cosmic "fun house" where trick lenses make them see what doesn't exist. That's what happened with the "brightest object ever seen" whose "discovery" was announced four years ago. Astronomers fell for a mirage. ...
In Bosnia, Look Who's Balking Now ADVANCING MUSLIMS
BY defying an American request to halt its military operations, the Bosnian government is risking the most potent weapon in its war against rebel Serbs - international sympathy. The continued push on Serb-held Banja Luka, together with the initial...
'Law and Order' Is on Tonight - How about a Rain Check?
ATTENTION disorders, increased violence, and promiscuous sexuality - these are just a few of the social ills that have been blamed on increased television viewing. While I admit to being disturbed by these, there's another side effect that people...
Lessons in Life and the German Language
Other than a desire to learn German, the 15 of us gathered in a former orphanage on a chilly day in spring had nothing obvious in common. That much was clear as we went around the room taking baby steps in this unfamiliar tongue. "Ich komme aus...."...
Lure of International Stock Grows as US Economy Lags of the Many Ways to Invest Abroad, One of the Safest Is Buying into American Firms That Sell Overseas
WITH the pace of the United States economy slackening, some investors are reviewing the prospects for foreign stock markets - and international stocks in particular. One way of buying international stocks, however, may not be the most obvious. Instead...
'New Thinking' on Six Major Public School Problems Areas Where Leadership and Care Can Bring about Change, Even When Dollars Are Short
PUBLIC education has resumed its activity for another 10-month period. But no school or district ever experiences a truly new year, until its leadership stops recycling its historically ineffective ideas and practices, and exchanges them for the ...
Noah's Ark or Nuisance? ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT
PROTECTING plants and animals from extinction would seem an idea all could embrace. Who would want to stand by while the grizzly bear or bald eagle became history? But the Endangered Species Act - a law the United States Supreme Court calls "the most...
Protecting Coral Reefs on Egypt's Sinai Coast Conservation Effort Fights Pollution, Limits Development
AN innovative environmental program, which could become a model for similar venues worldwide, has rescued this rapidly growing tourist and diving resort from the ravages of over-hasty developers and mushrooming scuba-diving centers. The coral-reef...
Putting Rwanda Back Together
THE only thing worse than genocide is the repeat of it. That is why President Clinton's recent authorization of $7 million to support reconstruction of Rwanda's judiciary and the war crimes tribunal is so important. Establishment of a secure environment...
Put Welfare and Society on a More Solid Footing
IN recent decades we have so completely rejected any kind of moral calculus that we have deliberately, systematically divorced welfare from moral sanctions or incentives. This reflects in part the theory that society is responsible for all social...
Quiltmaker Pioneers Improvisational, Exuberant Patterns
Nancy Crow's quilts are not the kind of quilts you might find in your grandmother's attic. "Nancy Crow: Improvisational Quilts," an exhibit of 33 art quilts at the Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, is an exuberant,...
Republican Vise Squeezes Liberals and Their Causes
AS the federal welfare program collapsed around him last week, New York Sen. Patrick Moynihan (D) gazed out across the Capitol lawn and wondered where all the banners and bullhorns had gone. In years past, he recalled, any attempt to lay a glove on...
Sports Notebook
New Sports Garden Has A Sweet-Smelling Name THE sports world may be losing one garden - the Boston Garden, which is scheduled for demolition - but it soon gains another in Portland, Ore. The 20,000-seat Rose Garden is wonderfully named, not only...
Tale of a Town's Unflagging Patriotism Skyscraper-Sized Stars and Stripes Joins Space Collection That Includes Moon Rocks and Astronaut Diapers
HOW big a pole do you need to fly a seven-ton flag? This is a question much on the minds of residents of Hutchinson, a town of 40,000 in the heart of Kansas wheat country. Earlier this year when the US government put a giant American flag on its...
The Mandate Habit
AS congressional conferees merge the House and Senate versions of welfare reform, will they hear echoes of their earlier debate on unfunded federal mandates? The finished reforms could, for example, include a demand that a certain percentage of current...
The News in Brief
The US The federal debt will likely hit the $4.9 billion legal ceiling in November. When it does, Speaker Gingrich said Sunday he will only allow for two- or three- day extensions until Congress and President Clinton agree on a seven-year plan to...
'The Turks Are Coming,' Cry Russians in Their Ex-Empire
THE evidence is all over the former Soviet Union, but especially along the ancient Silk Road to China. Luxury hotels, a new airport, universities, and restaurants: from Kazakstan to Azerbaijan, development projects are often the work of Turks. ...
'To Die For' Is Darkly Comic Look at Middle-Class Milieu the Satire's Heroine Plots Murder to Further Her Career
MOST satires of mass-media entertainment, like "Network" and "The Player," aim their humor at large-scale institutions with lots of money and clout. In real life, though, much of the media's noise can be traced to more marginal sources, from the drone...
When Anyone Can Run, Everyone Does Other Choices for President Range from James 'Dull' Stewart to Wyoming Wolf
IF the current crop of presidential candidates leaves you uninspired, consider Fred Sitnick. At a time when most White House hopefuls are preaching fiscal responsibility and limited government, Mr. Sitnick stands alone. His campaign motto: "Zillions...
Why Argentines Cheer Man Who Hikes Taxes
DESPITE harsh economic policies that have wreaked havoc on the lives of ordinary Argentines, the controversial economic minister Domingo Cavallo enjoys a surprising 90 percent approval rating. According to recent polls, the Harvard-trained economist,...
Why Health Care Hot Potato for Elderly Can Be Touched Efforts to Cut Medicare and Medicaid Once Hurt Careers. No Longer
IT'S August 1989, and senior citizens are hopping mad. Congress has approved new Medicare benefits to protect against catastrophic medical expenses, and the elderly don't want to pay extra for it. In one of the most striking scenes from any August...
Worth Noting on TV
*WEDNESDAY Women of Country: in Performance at the White House (PBS, day and time broadcast schedules vary): Suzy Bogguss, Alison Krauss, and Kathy Mattea each share their distinctive blends of pop, bluegrass, and folk with the Clintons and their...