The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 24, 1996

A Better Way to Put More Minorities in Congress Representation with Multimember Districts Can Do the Job without Racial Gerrymandering
Recently a divided US Supreme Court invalidated five minority congressional districts - two in North Carolina and three in Texas - ruling that the use of race as a predominant factor in drawing district lines violated the Constitution.This is not the...
An Unpaid Debt from the War in Vietnam
Le Van Ngung is the third name from the bottom on an innocuous 29-year-old secret report. Prepared by finance officer US Navy Lt. John D. Fussell, the report notified South Vietnamese Army Col. Tran Van Ho that as of June 1, 1967, Mr. Ngung was to be...
A Poor Country Finds Hope in a New Woman Leader Sheikh Wajed Becomes Bangladesh's Prime Minister, Perhaps Bringing Political Stability and Economic Growth
After more than two years of political and economic turmoil, Bangladesh has taken its first tentative steps towards normalcy with the swearing-in yesterday of a new government headed by Sheikh Hasina Wajed's Awami League party.The Awami League is returning...
Arabs Warn Israel to Keep Its Obligations CAIRO SUMMIT
Arab leaders appeared to take a tough stance yesterday by demanding that Israel's new government continue the Mideast peace process and not reject exchanging occupied land for peace.They also declared that any "setback" will be the responsibility of...
Arriving at Contentment on a Summer Evening
My husband and I are trying to persuade our daughters, age 4 and 2, to go in. "It's getting dark, girls," I argue."But I like the dark," complains the four-year-old.I understand. But it's 9:30, and we grownups are tired. "It's bedtime," I say, prying...
A Transatlantic Airline Deal Hits Antitrust Turbulence CLOSED SKIES?
A planned global alliance between British Airways and American Airlines is beginning to meet resistance.London regulators asked Friday for proof that the two airlines, which already control 60 percent of Britain-US flights, won't stifle competition with...
Back from the Brink
The United States finally wrung from China another agreement on intellectual property rights recently - just short of the deadline for imposing $2 billion in trade sanctions.This was no glorious triumph for the Americans, however. Acting US Trade Representative...
Big Radio Merger Fuels Concern over Diversity
In the early 1980s, Burlington, Vt., literally buzzed with local radio news. The city had just elected the country's only Socialist mayor, the Democrats and Republicans were up in arms, and the city's four radio stations, all with strong local news departments,...
Daring to Live in the Details Pulitzer Prize-Winning Poet Jorie Graham Finds Her Voice Somewhere between the Intuited and the Observed
Poet Jorie Graham says she is never far from a sense of herself as a "reporter" and of her writing as "a kind of news." As a child, the 1996 Pulitzer Prize-winner for poetry grew up in the border country between the realities of journalism and the verities...
Do Minority Students Need Minority Teachers? Some Specialists Argue That Minority Children Learn Better from Educators of the Same Race and Background
As an African-American school teacher, Penny Draper doesn't have to consult studies to find out how to connect with her pupils. She experiences it every day in her class of 25 first-graders at the Wilkinson Early Childhood Center in St. Louis. "I relate...
Firms Help Parents Spy on Nannies
Every morning, when the couple left their Long Island home for work, they handed their 10-month-old daughter over to a nanny. They had liked the woman at first, but lately she seemed a little sloppy and neglectful. Still, they weren't entirely sure.The...
'Guided by Voices' Catapults from Obscurity to Stardom Midwestern Group Is Rock Media's Current Darling
'Doesn't that song make you feel loved," cooed Guided by Voices frontman Robert Pollard to a rapturous crowd during a recent concert at New York City's Irving Plaza.Pollard - a former schoolteacher now in the midst of a second career as an alterna-rock...
Harvard Square Culture War: A Bid for Sparse Retail Space Plans to Replace Funky Cafes and Moldy Bookstores with Steel and Glass Mall-Space Have Locals Up in Arms
It's not the big-name stores, trendy restaurants, or cluttered coffee shops that make Harvard Square one of the hippest hangouts on the East Coast and one of Boston's top tourist stops.Here, the currency is pop culture; the main attraction, attitude....
Indonesia Power Struggle Puts Sukarno Daughter on Outside
Indonesia has now followed a few other Asian nations, from Pakistan to the Philippines, in having a female political martyr fighting for democracy.She is Megawati Sukarnoputri, the daughter of Indonesia's founding president, the late Sukarno. Spurned...
In Russia's Race for President, a Rush to Regroup
With the rock-ribbed and ramrod straight Alexander Lebed suddenly the most prominent figure in his administration, Boris Yeltsin enters the final week of the Russian presidential campaign far stronger than a week ago when he won the first round of the...
Investment in Inner-City Teens Yields Communitywide Benefits
Alan Jones leans forward, hands spread as if to show how it happened. "Teen Empowerment cracked me open," he says with a touch of wonder in his voice. "I used to be shy, too scared to give a speech, but now I have a lot of confidence."Nilda Amado echoes...
Light Sounds of Cocteau Twins Draw in Diverse Crowd
It's been said that the Cocteau Twins are Metallica's favorite group. Yet not a trace of heavy metal can be heard in their songs. In fact, their music is just the opposite - delicate, airy, beautiful.The alternative band has never attracted mass appeal,...
More Than Words Are Needed to Stop Terror in Burundi
Burundi today is standing on the brink of genocide. Now is the moment to prevent more bloodletting. Unless Burundian leaders reject extremism, rein in militias and runaway insurgents, and agree to a cessation of fighting and the onset of meaningful,...
Poland Seeks Role as Europe's Stabilizer INTERVIEW WITH PRESIDENT
For Polish president Aleksander Kwasniewski, further discussion on why Poland wants to join NATO is no longer an option. What matters now is how quickly the former Warsaw Pact nation will enter the North Atlantic Alliance.After the second session of...
Political Appointees under Microscope 'Filegate' Case Raises Questions about Wisdom of Giving Loyalists Sensitive Government Jobs
Behind the growing controversy over "filegate" lie enduring questions about the people presidents appoint to sensitive government posts.The news that a low-ranking administration staffer used White House letterhead to request confidential FBI background...
Protection for Churches Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
The recent burning of black Christian churches in the U.S.A. is an attack on innocent people. Innocence is often thought of as weakness or vulnerability to attack. But innocence that comes from knowledge of God, who is omnipotent Truth, is not vulnerable;...
Questions for the FAA
In the immediate aftermath of the May 11 ValuJet crash in the Florida Everglades, Transportation Secretary Federico Pena and Federal Aviation Administrator David Hinson were quick to assure the public that ValuJet planes were safe to fly. So their sudden...
Softer Three-Strikes Law Brings Wave of Appeals
Fay Arfa, a long-time criminal attorney here, is readying a petition asking a Superior Court judge to reconsider the 25-years-to-life sentence slapped on her client last December. Her client's crime: stealing five bottles of liquor from a supermarket."I...
The News in Brief
THE USDemocrats planned to unveil their "Families First" agenda in five cities. The agenda calls for educational tax breaks, expanded health insurance for children, and welfare reform, sources say. Also, President Clinton and Vice President Gore were...
Why Not Government Service?
The commencements are over, and thousands of college graduates are starting their careers in jobs they hope will make use of their four-year preparation. They'll find before them an extremely diverse range of career opportunities.Except one. Unfortunately,...
Women Learn to Hear the Varied Voices of Girls Helpful Listeners Can Make the Difference for Teens
If adults took the time to really listen to adolescent girls who are labeled "at risk" - for dropping out of school, early pregnancy, and other potential obstacles to healthy development - what would they learn?A great deal, according to Carol Gilligan,...