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The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 11, 1997

A Bear's Tale Makes Russian Media's Fur Fly Business and Government Use the Power of Purse to Gag the Media
The ties that bind politics, big business, and the press in Russia are uncomfortably tight these days.One recent tale of just how tight began with a brief hunting trip by Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin in the old style of Soviet officials.Bulldozers...
As Talks near, Syria and Israel Circle Each Other Big Question in Damascus: 'Does Netanyahu Want Peace?'
Deadlocked peace talks between Syria and Israel have all the elements of a cold-war thriller: As the drums of war beat in the background, the enemies remain locked in rhetorical battle over "sacred" issues. Negotiators trade accusations of stonewalling...
As Uncle Sam Sells Insurance, Critics See 'Corporate Welfare'
For more than two decades, an obscure federal agency has helped American companies do everything abroad from baking hamburger buns in Brazil to drilling for natural gas in India.But why should the Overseas Private Investment Corp. be providing $14 million...
A Useful First Draft
The stage may be set for something Americans haven't seen in a number of years: relatively constructive negotiation over the national budget. While President Clinton's 1998 spending plan, unveiled last week, got a tepid reception on Capitol Hill, each...
A Wake-Up Call to Save the Sea's Shrinking Fish Stocks
Canada's ravished codfish stocks are in protective custody. So is Georges Bank, the historic fishing area off the coast of New England. It's time to do the same for the North Sea.The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea now urges a drastic...
Church Groups Supply New Housing for Poor PRAISE THE LANDLORD
When Geraldine Fowler walks through the glass doors of the Bishop Boardman Apartment building, she enters a tidy lobby without a word of graffiti in sight.Her apartment is a slice of Americana - thick carpeting, lace curtains, and a cross-stitching on...
Clinton, Lott Hold the Keys to Unlocking a Budget Deal
Striding to the House podium before his State of the Union speech last week, President Clinton paused to shake a hand - and Sen. Trent Lott, first among his escorts, bumped him from behind.It was a small collision that may be a metaphor for large political...
Don't Blame TV for 'Kids These Days'
The V-chip is coming; television ratings are upon us; a new study reveals that the "family hour" is full of sex. The race is on to shelter our kids from the evil box.Our growing anxiety over television masks another problem, one less amenable to quick...
German Joblessness - Highest since Hitler - Rattles Europe
It's carnival time here in the Rhineland. And with so many people running around wearing harlequin costumes and funny hats and face paint, it's hard to tell that Germany is in the grips of its worst unemployment crisis since 1933.January jobless figures...
Hazing Rituals in Military Are Common - and Abusive
Despite top brass claims that the "blood pinning" of Marine paratroopers isn't tolerated, hazing occurs in every branch of the US military.Interviews with several American service men and women reveal that, like college fraternity initiation rites, hazing...
High Schoolers Say the Path to a Diploma Is Too Easy JUST GETTING BY
Contrary to popular belief, the vast majority of American public high school students want much tougher academic standards and stricter discipline in the classroom, according to a nationwide poll released today.Indeed, most American teenagers feel they...
Hubble Unveils Revolutionary Views from Spotting Star Nurseries to New Planets, the Orbiting Space Telescope's Sharp Vision Has Forever Changed Astronomical Science
For astronomers, the Hubble Space Telescope is more than a space-age tool of their trade. Scientists who use it consider it a symbol of human achievement that unites them with people everywhere.Astrophysicist John Bahcall at the Institute for Advanced...
If You're Sitting on Cash, Here Are Some Options Wary of US Stocks, Experts like Bonds, Foreign Markets, Real Estate
Even with all the money pouring into stock mutual funds, Americans still have almost $1 trillion in money-market funds.If you hold some of that cash, you may be wishing you had put it into stocks two years ago. But now, market indexes are pushing toward...
LAPD Chief's Reelection Is A Test of Police Accountability
Willie" or won't he?The question of whether police chief Willie Williams will take the helm of the Los Angeles Police Department for a second term is being scrutinized by everyone from local citizens' groups to national police watchdog organizations.The...
Letters
The UN - Too Much Power or Not Enough?In the Jan. 24 letter, "The UN's threat to the US," Ruth Dollahon of Mothers for America clearly misses the message of the Human Development Report: Governments, UN organizations, and others must rethink national...
Making Sweets Talk
I'm used to unusual assignments. After all, I'm a reporter. But this one took the cake. My editor called me into his office early one morning. He said he had an important assignment. He wanted it done pronto."Valentine's Day is coming up," he said, leaning...
New York Takes New Course in Running Schools after 30 Years of Politicized Community Boards and Low Standards, the Nation's Largest School System Is Undergoing Fundamental Change
A new era is dawning in the troubled New York City school system - the result of a profound shift in thinking that may influence urban systems across the nation.After decades of corruption, neglected school buildings, and miserable student test scores,...
On the Brink Serbia, Bulgaria, Albania, and Romania Are Facing a New Wave of Popular Unrest
A second wave of revolutions is rocking the Balkan states. These are not merely uprisings against the remnants of communism but mass movements of desperation with dire economic conditions. They are directed against incumbent governments, whether post-communist...
Sappy or Snappy? Cupids Choose Their Verse Whatever the Sentiment, Valentine Cards Will Number Nearly a Billion This Year
It's been said there are two kinds of people in the world: dog people and cat people. In the realm of valentine cards there are two types of people, too: those who buy short, pithy cards and those who go for the long and sappy ones.You know the cards....
Sweden to Switch off First Nuclear Plant in 1998 as the First Country Planning to Phase out All of Its Nuclear Reactors, Sweden Faces a Myriad of Economic, Environmental, and Political Effects
The Swedish government's decision last week to close two nuclear reactors has touched off one of the hottest political debates here since the decision to join the European Union 2-1/2 years ago.The closure of the two reactors marks the beginning of a...
The News in Brief
The USPresident Clinton plans to take the education policies he unveiled before Congress last week to statehouses around the country, the White House said. The president was scheduled to make the first such visit to the Maryland General Assembly in Annapolis....
Washington Sharpens Scissors in Another Bid to Cut Medicare Costs
Now that President Clinton has submitted a budget proposal to Congress, a key question in the upcoming fiscal minuet is what to do about Medicare.The nation's health-care program for the elderly is losing money fast. Its trustees estimate that Medicare's...
World's Scientists Learn New Ways to Clear Deadly Land Mines Improved Technologies Help, but Bigger Strides Are Needed
One of the worst legacies of war is the land mine.Sown by soldiers in wartime, it often inflicts its heaviest toll on civilians in peacetime. Every year, mines cause thousands of casualties, half of them children. And the process of removing them is...
Would Peace with Israel End Assad's Rule?
Outside Syria, it is widely believed by many analysts that President Hafez al-Assad wants to put off making peace with Israel. He is afraid, such outsiders speculate, that ties to the Jewish state and the West would bring openness to Syrian society -...
You're Worth Something A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
Have you ever heard about how valuable you are? You are important because God needs you.That might sound strange-why would God need us? Some people think God is like an old man who made the earth a long time ago and doesn't even think about us anymore....