The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 18, 1997

A Hotel Offers Early (Welfare) Check Out
One by one, human resources director Benita Allen calls the graduates - many in tears - to the stage to receive their certificates.For some, this is their first graduation from anything, and it comes with a bonus: a guaranteed entry-level bellhop or...
Brazil's Landless Refuse to Be Voiceless as Well Grass-Roots Movement Becomes Main Political Opposition
The blue-and-white tile mural that dominates the entrance to the Carlos Botelho Agricultural School shows a bucolic scene of a proud farmer tilling his land with a horse-drawn plow.The peaceful picture stands in stark contrast to the reality of rural...
College Jocks: Part-Time Jobs Are OK, but Pay for Play?
While most college students dread putting on aprons and punching time clocks, in past years athletes on scholarship some-times considered working students fortunate.That's because the athletes were forbidden from working during the academic year by National...
Court Tests Limits of Religious Liberty Can Congress Pass Laws to Protect Practices?
The US Supreme Court hears a landmark case tomorrow that will help define the limit of religious liberty in the United States. Church groups say the outcome will affect nearly every person of faith in the US.While the case began as a narrow zoning dispute...
Forget the Mouse - Just Talk Instead
My computer is taking dictation today. I speak, it types out the words. At least it's trying to.Before it got cleaned up, that second sentence said "it types OF the words."But look beyond this initial mistake and something quite exciting is taking place....
For US and Iran, 17 Years of No Dialogue Is Too Long
This past Nov. 4 marked the 17th anniversary of the seizure of my embassy in Tehran. It was 16 years on Jan. 20 since my hostage colleagues and I returned from Tehran. The first is an anniversary we choose not to observe; the second we will always celebrate....
Green Money
Doing well by doing good - the old line has new meaning for individuals, businesses, and governments that find economic savings and environmental improvement go hand in hand.A householder takes a small step to reduce power plant pollution by switching...
Hands-On Science Museum in a Book
Break out the Borax, some mixing bowls, and white glue, gather the kids, and tell them you're going to whip up a batch of ExploraGoo. Let 'em roll it into balls and bounce it, shape it with cookie-cutters, freeze it, squeeze it into containers to see...
Intellect and Education A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
People can remember and reason much earlier in life than was once believed. Several different studies have reported that children understand certain math concepts before they even say their first words!But none of this explains the educational process...
Italy Ponders World without Any Italians BAMBINI BUST
Cinzia Zago, the young mother of a 10-month-old baby, waited five years before having a child. She is not sure she wants a second one."I work full time," she says, "and having a child is very, very complicated." Ms. Zago, who sells baby clothes in the...
Kay Graham's Story as Told by Herself the Woman Who Owned, Then Ran the Washington Post
Personal HistoryBy Katharine GrahamAlfred A. Knopf 642 pp., $29.95 Katharine Graham, the former publisher of The Washington Post, has given us easily some of the best reading of the year in her memoir, "Personal History." The use of power and fame by...
Kids Queue Up for 'LA's BEST' Popular After-School Program Keeps Students in Class, out of Trouble, and Having Fun
For eight-year-old Samuel Lafa, it's a waiting game. Standing to one side on the playground at Logan Street School, with a basketball under his arm, he finds the after-school program known as LA's BEST is just out of reach to him."Samuel has been on...
Letters
No Charity in the Term 'Corporate Welfare'In the cause of good journalism, I urge the Monitor to be the first to retire the phrase "corporate welfare" (editorial, Feb.4). It is at best confusing, at worst a case of dishonest and destructive anticapitalism.On...
Once Again, Tech Stocks Are Hot, but Be Choosy Technology Has Led Market Advance, but Promises to Remain Volatile
Technology stocks have roared back to life, waking up the market with them.But before rushing to plug technology issues into your own portfolio, investment professionals urge caution. Be choosy, they say.Spurred by solid earnings, low inflation and...
One Man's Theory Is Cutting Crime in Urban Streets
George Kelling knew he had the opportunity of a criminologist's lifetime - the chance to test his controversial theory in one of the most crime-ridden venues in America.As a newly hired consultant to the New York City subway's police department, the...
Playing 'Mom' to a Bouncing Baby Orang the Ultimate Goal: Train Zoo Apes to Be Better Mothers
It is 9:30 a.m. in the nursery at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo, and a keeper is trying to change the diaper of a six-week-old baby orangutan."Eeeeeeeeeee! Ooo-ee, ooo-ee, ooo-ee!" the baby gives out a high-pitched squeal that sounds something like a broken...
Reckless Snowmobilers Incur Minnesota's Censure
The campaign to crack down on reckless and drunk drivers is making its way to the backwoods snowmobile trails of Minnesota.Spurred on by public outrage over the deaths of two children - both pedestrians run down by snowmobiles - and the increasing number...
Summer Fun Is the Focus as Children Choose Camps but the Trend Is toward Shorter Sessions and More Specialization
Never mind that the calendar says winter. For several hundred families attending a camp fair on a February Sunday, the season inside a suburban Holiday Inn is already summer.Photos lining the 36 exhibit booths show idyllic scenes of children swimming,...
The Dirt on 'Dry Clean Only' Labels
You've found that perfect soft, warm sweater. But the label says "dry clean only." Drat. Another thing to take to the cleaner, another $8 every time you go.Still, you can't help but wonder if handwashing would really lead to ruin.Clothing manufacturers...
The News in Brief
The USThe Clinton administration shifted its policy toward the US territory of Guam in late 1996 after a Guam Democratic Party official visited Washington in 1995 with more than $250,000 in campaign contributions, The Washington Post reported. Guam has...
The Old South's Symbols
Symbols of power, loyalty, and group identity stir strong emotions - and often opposite emotions in different people. Case in point: the Confederate flags and monuments common in America's South.The increased political clout and social assertiveness...
The Question for Wall Street: How Far, How Fast?
The rush is on to buy American stocks, and that is giving a rush to the American stock market.The market stunned investors on Thursday, when the Dow Jones industrial average breached the 7,000-point milestone. And that came quickly on the heels of breaking...
To End Bad Air as Well as Utility Monopolies 'Clean Power Portfolios' Would Require at Least Some Electricity from Renewable Sources like Wind and Solar
Across the United States, power lines are fast becoming battle lines between business and industry on one side and the environmental and health communities on the other.On one front, the Clinton administration recently proposed regulations to improve...
Too Little Stability in Turkey US and Its Allies Should Help Resolve Crisis Democratically
Tanks rumbling through the streets of Sincan, a province near Ankara, sent a clear signal recently that Turkish democracy is in a crisis. Since the formation of the Islamic center-right coalition government last June, several civilian attempts to bring...
Unique Passbook Offers Passage out of Poverty
Three years ago, Tina Moynihan was pregnant and a high school dropout. Today, when she's not working part-time at an Indianapolis bank, she's caring for her son in her own two-bedroom bungalow.Ms. Moynihan beat the odds with help from Indianapolis's...
Why Spy Nominee Gets Cold Shoulder While GOP Lawmakers Question Anthony Lake's Approval of Secret Iranian Arms Deals, Former CIA Chiefs See Politics Behind Delays in Hearings
Working out of a small office at the Central Intelligence Agency, the man tapped as the new head of America's espionage apparatus has spent the past weeks learning his way around the CIA complex and soliciting ideas on reforms.But whether William Anthony...