The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 12, 1997

America's Past Comes Alive with a Bang A New Hampshire Reenactment Evokes a Tide-Turning Siege
Puffs of smoke burst from between the thick stakes of the palisade, from the watchtower, from the shingled rooftops of the unpainted, deeply weathered buildings. Capt. Phineas Stevens and his 30 militiamen fire off musket volleys, along with shouted...
As China Glares, Taiwan Gulps US Unclear on Defending an Old Ally. Talk of Succession Agitates Beijing Series: New Taiwanese-Made Fighter Jets Were Commissioned at Taichung in April. as China Talks More about Taking Back the Island, Taiwan Seeks a Greater US Military Shield. LIANG-YI/AP
To people living on this Far East island, the signs of trouble are clear. First, they saw China, flexing new muscles of nationalism, firing test missiles near Taiwan's shores last year. Then they heard American leaders utter conflicting or ambivalent ...
Big Export for Britain Clashes with New Ethic ARMS TO ROUGH CUSTOMERS
What happens when admirable, populist politics threaten to bottleneck a well-worn path to profit? Consider that the country with the world's second-largest arms-export industry is now being run by a government that hopes to make human rights the...
Cambodian Ruler's Troops Pin Refugees at Thai Border Some Have Escaped to Thailand, but Many More Await Fall of Royalist Stronghold
A boy wanders with a group of other teenagers at a border crossing, 230 miles from his home in the Cambodian city of Pailin. With only $30, the boy left his family and fled for safety behind the lines of royalist soldiers as they held off the soldiers...
College Students Seek More Counsel Services Burgeon, from 'Choices 101' to Campus Radio Talk Shows and Online Groups
When Ilene Rosenstein, the director of the counseling center at the University of Pennsylvania, sat down last year to gauge how many students might seek services, she miscalculated - by a full one-third. In total, the center, which was swamped...
Dear Diary: The Art of Confiding on Paper Is as Popular as Ever New York Exhibition Displays Journals from Four Centuries
John Steinbeck berates himself for writer's block, Charlotte Bronte struggles with homesickness, and Victor Hugo's daughter, Adele, is driven by a romantic obsession. Alongside them, a young American woman delights in a French dinner party, a sailor...
Do Broadcasters Serve Public Enough? Advent of 'Advanced TV' Leads Clinton, FCC to Rethink Industry's 'Public Interest' Duties
Turn on the television. As the picture flickers on, has it ever occurred to you the airwaves carrying "NYPD Blue" and the evening news also belong to you? Probably not. But it has to Reed Hundt, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission...
Electronic Moles Map Route for Rapid Response When Earth Moves Series: Part 1 Ran on Aug. 11
On March 18, 1997, the Mojave Desert pitched and swayed in a magnitude 5.4 earthquake centered underneath the ghost town of Calico, east of Barstow, Calif. Within five minutes, a map appeared on the World Wide Web showing where the temblor hit,...
Faiths Join to End Persecution - Reversing the 'Ism' Schism Member of US Advisory Group Explains New Religious Cooperation
What a powerful combination - Americans of many faiths joining hands with their government and with partners worldwide to expose and roll back religious persecution! That is an important "story behind the story" of the US State Department's helpful...
FALLING SPACE ROCKS Asteroid Trackers Build A Better Warning System
It may seem like the stuff of Hollywood disaster movies. But scientists say the asteroid threat is real. In fact, it may have been a mammoth wayward space rock that brought the demise of dinosaurs. And some scientists now say the floods, fire,...
Hungarians, Czechs, Poles Race to Join EU
The political attention recently given to the entry of Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary into NATO has obscured the important - but directly related - phenomenon of Central Europe's growing integration into the Western economy. Membership in...
Israel: Overplayed Hands
Lest we forget: The game everyone is supposed to be playing in the Mideast had its general rules set in Oslo. The players leave the board in real or tactical anger from time to time. Referees like Dennis Ross rush in. Timetables slip. But, nonetheless,...
Is Your House a Home, or Is It an Investment? If It's an Investment, Watch Price Changes Carefully
Q In a recent article about asset allocation, several investment advisers recommended that an average investor today should keep 40 percent of assets in stocks, 50 percent in bonds, and 10 percent in cash. For many people, this recommendation leaves...
Kenya's Best Hope: A Rising Middle Class in a Rare Move, the Business Class Turned out for Friday's Protest for Political Reforms
As Abel Mugenda stands listening to speeches about legal and constitutional reform, he has hope. He thinks Kenya is ripe for change. The reason, Dr. Mugenda says, is a growing and increasingly vocal middle class. "The concept of a middle class...
Letters
Origins of the Israeli Conflict I enjoyed the articles in the special report, "Peace in the Balance" (part 1, July 30) but would like to comment on the author's brief analysis of the Arab rejection of the UN partition resolution. For the indigenous...
Malibu May Wake Rudely from Its California Dream Focus Moves from Gidget to Budget as City Is Left on the Brink by Four Major Natural Disasters
Admit it. When you were California dreamin' on any one of a hundred miserable winter's days, you wished you were here - maybe basking in the tan-friendly glow of a perpetual afternoon sun, or hanging 10 on a surfboard dancing along the crystal...
MONITOR QUIZ: Sports Terms with Strange Names
Listed below are common words in our language; however, they have a different meaning on the playing field. According to "Webster's Sports Dictionary," sport does, in fact, have a language of its own. "It is a language that is often crisp and to...
Next Big Defense-Cut Target: Civilians Mechanics and Managers Move to Alabama This Summer in a Downsizing Experiment
Since the end of July, 200 transferees a week have passed through a sleek corner conference room here at the Army's sprawling Redstone Arsenal. They're issued identification badges, briefed about neighborhoods, and given tips for surviving stifling...
Sidewalk Life Comes to Denver LODO AS SOHO
It is a typical warm, summer night at Coors Field, Denver's retro-style new ballpark, where the red brick facade melds seamlessly with the old warehouses of the city's lower downtown. Yet another capacity crowd of 50,000 cheers wildly as its Rockies...
The Actor with A Yawning Audience
Reporters who roamed the country back at the time of Watergate found a public outraged over that Washington scandal. There's no such public outrage - not yet anyway - over recent excesses in political fund-raising. Sen. Fred Thompson, (R) of Tennessee,...
The News in Brief
The US President Clinton used his line-item veto power for the first time, striking down a tax break for food-processing firms and a spending item affecting the Medicaid health-care program. The tax item was reportedly worth $84 million over five...
The Rat That Wires Schools to the Web
Judy Reavis recently discovered a brilliant new way to wire public schools for the Internet. Judy is vice president of Hermes Systems Management, a company in Benicia, Calif., that finds new technology products for schools. One day, Judy was talking...
The Truth about Mistakes Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Have you ever made a mistake? One that couldn't be taken back or corrected? One that affected the whole rest of your life? I have. It's a tough place to be. You know it was a mistake, and now you have to live with the consequences. In my case,...
The Veto's on the Line
President Clinton is giving the opponents of the line item veto an opportunity to prove their point. By carefully axing some minor portions of the recently passed budget and tax bills, he creates aggrieved parties - legislators who backed the measures,...
UPS Strike Puts Competitors' Systems in the Spotlight
It's crunch time for delivery services like the United States Postal Service and Federal Express. The strike at United Parcel Service has meant more packages to handle and longer work hours. "It's a nightmare," says my local Fed Ex delivery man,...
Why Travelers Flock to Airports in Small Cities Lower Fares, Less Congestion Boost Traffic at Minor Airfields
Corporate lawyer Sig Roos works in Boston. But he seldom flies from nearby Logan International Airport. Instead, Mr. Roos drives an extra 15 minutes or more to Rhode Island's T. F. Green Airport, taking the interstate south to Providence, rather...