The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 1, 1998

A Compass for College
The fall exodus of college-bound offspring is bound to prompt mixed emotions in parents. Sure, you may not miss your child's "music," or listening for car wheels at 11 p.m., midnight, 1 a.m. But then it's: "You're leaving? So soon?"And you wonder: Will...
A Mirage of Business as Usual before Jakarta Beats the Bust
One year after Indonesia's economic boom went bust, gross domestic product has declined more than 15 percent, the currency has lost 80 percent, inflation has exceeded 60 percent and half the country's 200 million people have fallen into poverty. Riots...
As Congress Returns from Recess, GOP Tests Clinton's Veto Resolve on Spending Bills. Hill Priorities: Money for Government, Taxpayers
If bills to keep the US government running are going to become law before the 105th Congress adjourns for good in October, lawmakers and President Clinton have a lot of compromising to do.These annual spending bills - 13 in all - will be the top priority...
Atten-Hut! Teacher on Deck and Ready for Duty Troops to Teachers Has Placed 3,000 Veterans in Classrooms since 1994, but It May Be Phased out in '99
There's a certain snap to Raquel Allen's classroom. Perhaps it's the bright white sweatshirts that her sixth-graders in Walker-Jones Elementary are wearing.Or the way her students straighten up before they march down the street to a basketball game at...
Before It's Too Late Riddle: When Does a Falling Tide Lift All Boats? When the Fed Lowers Interest Rates. It's Now Time to Do So
It's hard to believe that only a few weeks ago many of Alan Greenspan's colleagues were leaning toward a hike in short-term interest rates. That was neo-1929 thinking.Rising interest, of course, makes the average American's consumer debt a bigger burden,...
College Finds Liberal-Arts Logo Brings Skepticism
What's in name?Apparently a lot of confusion when it comes to the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, which until last year was called North Adams State University.The change is one of the reasons, school officials say, that the state school is dealing...
Desperate to Collect Taxes, Russia Can't West Insists That Moscow Improve Tax Collection. but Lack of Progress Has Set off a Chain of Nonpayments
Thousands of miles away from the current crisis in Moscow, the tax police recently swooped in on a major energy provider in Russia's Far East as part of a government campaign to get tough on evaders.The police seized $1.6 million worth of houses and...
Despite Abuses, These Indonesians Want Unity People in Aceh Were Tortured and Killed by Military. but They Still Feel Part of Country
Jumpa Amin wore only long-sleeved dresses after she returned home from 70 days in an military detention center.Long sleeves hid the bruises and scratches this grandmother says Indonesian soldiers and their local henchmen gave her because they believed...
From L.A. to Maine: From Tupac to Jewel
When I chose to go to Colby College in Waterville, Maine, I knew I was making the right decision. I was excited about the school because of its small population and high academic standards. On the other hand, I almost rejected Colby's invitation because...
Getting to Know You Colleges Beef Up Orientation to Help Freshmen Settle in, Build Campus Ties
Even though it sits in the academic shadow of nearby Yale University, plucky Southern Connecticut State University unveiled a second-to-none secret weapon at its new-student orientation this year - a lobster dinner and fireworks.Both were part of a four-day...
Jousting on Jordan's 'Draconian' New Press Law US's Public Silence Raises Queries about Clampdown in 'Citadel of Democracy'
The telephone call came from the office of Jordan's increasingly powerful Press and Publications Department, in order to "pass on a message."That message last April - even before a tough new press control law was enacted - was: Write only the "official"...
Letters
The Importance of Being GrammaticalI appreciated the article "'Star Trek' Aim 'To Boldly Go' Approved by New Dictionary" (Aug. 25), but was also saddened by it. I very much agree with Simon Jenkins and others quoted in the article, who implied that using...
Living Alone? Treat Yourself as a Guest. Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
After 35 years of marriage and raising a family, she became a widow. All her children were grown, and within a year the last of them had left the family home. For the next 30 years, my mother lived alone. Yet she did it with such remarkable grace that...
Monitor Quiz Literary Destinations
Books for young readers often have journeys in them - by train, carriage, or rabbit hole. Here are selections from some well-known children's books. What books are they from? Where are the children going?1. The mountains turned into hills, the hills...
N. Korea Tests New Muscle A Reclusive Regime with Nuclear Potential Lobs a Missile over Japan. but Why?
The United States, Japan, and other countries worry about North Korea mainly for two reasons: its suspicious nuclear-energy program and its capacity to develop ballistic missiles.But in the last several months, there have been worrying signs that the...
One Man's Mission: Home for Every Pet California Animal-Welfare Activist Is Taking His Controversial 'No Kill' Crusade across the United States
Richard Avanzino has the mischievous smile of a born troublemaker.And so he has been, with some pride, for more than 20 years as head of the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. He's brought a Midas touch and an orator's voice...
One Way to Summit Success Go beyond Unratified SALT II and Unilaterally Remove Some Warheads
Though it may have eclipsed our view for the moment, the immediacy of Russia's domestic crisis and the economic upheavals it has triggered around the world have not changed the one, overarching fact of US-Russian relations: The United States and Russia...
Sometimes the Best Track Isn't the Fast One
Mention the word tracking in a faculty lunchroom and the temperature rises. Bring it up at a PTSA meeting and the rest of the agenda will go untouched. Everybody has a theory to espouse and a story to tell. What is remarkable is that each storyteller...
Squelching the Urge to Splurge as Consumer Spending Dips for the First Time in Two Years, Economic Exuberance Tapers Off
For the first nine months of the year, the American consumer kept the US economy afloat. Now, economists are predicting the shopping spree is over - with implications for economies from South Korea to New Zealand.Instead, it's now likely that consumers...
Student Essays: Nature, Music, and Growing
Teachers and college students regularly have a say in our pages. Today, we give voice to younger teens as well. We asked them to write about issues that matter to them - at school and at home. Many thoughtful essays crossed our desks; sometimes whole...
The Crowd at Athletic Frontier Triathletes
Most people used to think these athletes were crazy. But now, it seems, Everyman wants to be an Ironman.The Ironman triathlon - where competitors swim 2.4 miles, bike 112, and run 26.2 - has become the inspiration for legions of common folk set on defying...
The News in Brief
The USHis host's economic and political woes were expected to dominate President Clinton's two-day summit with Russian President Boris Yeltsin. Clinton was also expected to raise arms-control and nuclear- nonproliferation issues, as well as his efforts...
What Comes Next for Clinton?
I don't know how many of today's political columnists were plying their trade in the early 1970s when President Nixon was going through his travail over Watergate. Not many, I'm sure. But I can remember those days clearly and the large number of hostile...
Why Markets Tumble Together in Wake of Ruble Devaluation, Economists Are Finding There's No Such Thing as Small in a Global Economy
"Bonfire of the currencies." "Meltdown!!!" "Fear of falling." "Global margin call."Economists and journalists are using such terms to describe the plunge in currency values and stock market prices that rumbled around the globe in the wake of Russia's...