The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 21, 2000

A Big Test of Presidential Timbre ; the Candidates' Different Approaches to the Electoral Drama Reveal Much about How Each Might Govern
The two scenes in Washington and Texas could hardly be more different. The central players in one of history's most riveting electoral dramas - each in his separate world, each approaching his predicament in wholly different ways - are providing fresh...
An Uncertain Future in Iron Country ; with New Mine Closure, Minnesotans See Their Unique Way of Life Slipping Away
For Tom Calgaro, there was never much mystery about what he would do when he grew up. The teenager lives on Mesabi Iron Range, and since his youngest days he's looked ahead, happily, to a life excavating, milling, and refining the ocher earth that...
Applying to College? Remember, Details and Sincerity Count
With more students applying to college than ever before, admissions directors are paying especially close attention to essays, interviews, and teacher recommendations. The "polish" or details in an application - such as insights on how a student...
Bishkek's Unlikely AIDS Battle ; Kyrgyzstan, One of the Poorest Former Soviet States, Takes a Proactive Approach in Prevention
Victor Logachev's red taxi may look like any other plying the dark streets of this Central Asian capital by night. But when men wave him down and ask to go to the downtown pyatak - the place where prostitutes await clients - they are in for a surprise....
Digging Up Evidence of Biblical Characters
In the Bible story, David defeats Goliath when David is still a young shepherd. Later, he grows up to be a powerful king of Israel. Sometimes, though, people have questioned whether David really existed at all, especially since his name had never been...
Election Hinges on Two Views of 'Valid Vote' ; the Validity of the Hand Count Depends on Which View the Florida High Court Takes
Lawyers for Vice President Al Gore are asking the Florida Supreme Court - nearly two weeks after the election - to redefine what constitutes a valid vote for president in three heavily Democratic counties in Florida. That is the essence of arguments...
Electoral Side Effect: Kids Are Paying Attention ; Some Americans May Find the Election Frustrating, but for Kids, It's Been a Lesson in Civics They Won't Soon Forget
Until the presidential election went into nail-biting overtime, Martin Plissner's 12- and 13-year-old children were not the least bit interested. Campaign issues like a prescription-drug benefit went right over their heads. But suddenly, when Americans...
Finding a 'Pathway' into Teaching
By the time Elijah West Jr. knew he wanted to be an elementary school teacher, he was married with three children and had a college degree in a completely different field. He dreamed of going back to school at nights to get his teaching certification,...
From Society's Margins to Helm of Brown U
Being "first" is becoming remarkably common for Ruth Simmons. Five years ago she made history as the new president of Smith College, the first black woman to head a top-ranked American college or university. Now Dr. Simmons, the daughter of Texas...
Instant Connections, Far off the Beaten Path ; Newly Hooked Up to the Web, Teachers and Kids in This Sheepfarming Town Work to Make the Most of a Suddenly Wider Academic World
In the hamlet of Binalong, population 250, sheep are often the nearest neighbors. Nobody worries when kids ride their bikes around the center of town - a cluster of pub, post office, and general store. With only 36 children, the primary school feels...
Like Student, like Teacher ; as Diversity among Students Increases, There's a Drive to Get More Minority Teachers at the Head of the Class
When America's teachers look out at their classrooms, the students are ever more racially and culturally diverse. But when those students look back at their teachers, they see a group that remains surprisingly unchanged. Minority students today...
New Level of Fighting in Mideast ; Israel Struck Gaza with Missiles after Palestinians Bombed an Israeli School Bus
For decades, Israelis have built communities on Arab land seized in the "six-day" war of 1967. Long the crux of Palestinian frustration, today these settlements are increasingly becoming the front line in the low-intensity war of attrition between...
Orderly Transitions of Power
United States officials should swallow hard before telling other nations how to maintain their democracies. As Americans watched a presidential election hang by a chad in Florida amid legal confusion, their government was telling Peru to ensure an...
Politics - War by Other Means
As debate rages about who really won the 2000 election, we have a sure loser: political science. A few months ago, a number of political scientists issued forecasts for the 2000 campaign. Cranking economic and electoral data into various mathematical...
Restoring Voter Confidence
Every vote counts. Or does it? One of the big lessons from the Florida vote fiasco is that the US must commit dollars to fix out- dated voting systems. The world's oldest modern democracy deserves better than punch-cards and mechanical levers as the...
Silent Political Issue: Nominations to the Fed Board ; Next President Will Appoint Five of Seven Fed Governors, Shaping America's Finances
Ask almost any American what key positions the new president will appoint, and the answer will likely be his Cabinet and vacancies on the Supreme Court. They are missing a third category that could have a great impact on their lives: top Federal Reserve...
Thanksgiving a la Mode ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Thanksgiving Eve. Busy day. Nearing midnight. Need to bake pies for tomorrow. Phone rings. Son desperately ill. Can I come? "Where are you?" (Just moved to new apartment 40 miles away.) Mumbled directions. Not clear. "I'll be there." Wake his dad....
To Save Divers' Paradise, Malaysia Fights Lawlessness ; Cross-Border Kidnappings Raise Questions about Security and Accepting Migrants from Neighboring Philippines and Indonesia
Atee Stanley gestures toward the empty beaches of Mabul Island and the placid waters of the Celebes Sea, sparkling under a late afternoon tropical sun. "Lots of our guests think it's the safest time to come. Unfortunately," she adds with a wry smile,...
What Are They Talking about in the Bible? ; NATIONAL Bible Week, Nov. 19-26
How tall was Goliath? What did Joseph's "coat of many colors" look like? How many spans are in a cubit? The Bible is full of great stories, but it also seems to be full of mystery. People buy things with shekels, manna is collected by the "omer,"...
What's Next for Peruvian Democracy?
The strange chapter of Alberto Fujimori's rule in Peru is ending like a warning label for leaders across Latin America. Caution, it reads: Sacrifice goals like development of democracy's institutions and reduction of poverty on the altar of short-term...
When an Essayis Not Enough
OK, I'll admit it. I sent something in. I was one of those high school students who thought I might benefit from thinking a little creatively about my college applications. So, just like a lot of seniors who are currently plugging away at their applications,...
When Good Feeling Ruled
Amid the heated election controversy, two events caught my attention. First, Ralph Nader was the guest at a Monitor lunch last Friday. The election was up in the air; but the reporters present seemed to think that the race was tilting toward George...
Why Limit Yourself to an Essay? ; College Applications Include Some Unusual Extras as Students Try to Stand Out
Can making 500 origami cranes really help a student get into a selective college? That's what one applicant to Wellesley College in Massachusetts sent in - along with the more standard fare of test scores, GPA, and essays. The intricate objects, she...