The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 30, 1993

African Nations Brace for Economic Impact of AIDS
EVIDENCE is growing of the high impact of AIDS on developing nations' economies.Industries face the loss of trained employees while many farms are losing laborers, according to two recent studies by the World Bank on AIDS in Africa. The continent has...
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A Master of Spy Tales Uncovers a New Plot
THE end of the cold war did not spell the end of spies - or stories about them. The Scarlet Pimpernel and Mata Hari were going strong long before the CIA and KGB hit their stride. And as we look toward the future, espionage seems here to stay.John le...
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Au Pair Program Biased to W. Europeans
IT is said that the biggest crimes in Washington are those that are legal, and when it comes to skirting the law, nobody does it better than the people who write the laws themselves.For example, it's illegal for persons to be discriminated against just...
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Aussies Are Hopping Mad about 'Roos an Australian National Symbol - the Kangaroo - Is Being Turned into a New National Cuisine
IT can't be easy to eat your national symbol. But Australians are overcoming their qualms about it. Soon, they'll all be throwing "Skippy" on the barby, instead of prawns.New South Wales became the fourth state to legalize the selling of kangaroo meat...
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Bosnia Air Strikes?
PRESIDENT Clinton this week reopened the possibility of United States military action in Bosnia in the form of air strikes. The White House says it is considering two plans - one to protect the United Nations forces in Bosnia, and one to stop the shelling...
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Boston's Timeless Love Affair Watercolor Artists from Benjamionn West to Andrew Wyeth Are Featured in a Museum of Fine Arts Exhibition
THE expatriate American artist John Singer Sargent once described painting with watercolor as "making the best of an emergency."The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has mounted an exhibition, "Awash in Color: Homer, Sargent and the Great American Watercolor,"...
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Castro's Cuba Hangs On
FIDEL CASTRO has not been able to count on his Moscow patron for some time now, and Cuba is in economic shambles. But the man who 40 years ago defied a corrupt right-wing dictatorship and, under Uncle Sam's nose, replaced it with a Marxist regime, jokes...
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Chance for US to Further Arab-Israeli Peace
CURRENT Israeli-Palestinian discord over the final status of Jerusalem offers a golden opportunity to attain a major breakthrough rather than a deadlock in the negotiations. The United States must seek to interject new dimensions into the peace process.Whether...
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Coed Softball Leagues Form at Fastball Speed the Latest Wrinkle in a Century-Old Game Is Men and Women Playing on the Same Team
IT'S the Dragons vs. the Rockets, seventh inning: The Rockets are down 12 to 8, and their coach, John Lamberg, yells encouragement: "We can hold 'em, guys! We can hold 'em!"Well, maybe not all guys. Half the squad is women.Coed teams like these two -...
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Congress's Female Caucus Grapples with Diversity Members Share Commitment to Women's Issues, Fall out over Abortion
THEY both have about three dozen Democratic House members. They both fight for liberal causes. They both represent demographic groups on the political rise.And, when President Clinton's budget-deficit plan goes for a vote in Congress, he will need support...
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Egypt Sliding into Crisis Mubarak Cited for Alleged Corruption and Disregard for Rights
IN less than a month, the Egyptian government has hanged 14 of its Islamic opponents, an act that has no parallel in Egypt's modern history. This is an alarming escalation in the government fight against the Islamists that could prove fatal for the stability...
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Events
FORCES ORDERED TO STOP BOSNIA FIGHTING Leaders of the three warring sides in Bosnia-Herzegovina, meeting at peace talks in Geneva, ordered their forces to stop fighting yesterday. Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic said the sides were making progress...
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Ever the Pessimist, Leonard Cohen Sings of Doom and Gloom
IF that Bronze Age man in the Italian glacier had been thawed out alive, imagine his intriguing reactions to our era.Well, we don't have him, but we do have Leonard Cohen.Mr. Cohen is no fossil. But the Montreal-born poet-novelist-singer likes to refer...
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Forty Years Later, Reasons Why Korean War Ended Still Baffle Many Scholars
COSTLY and unpopular, the Korean War ended in a bitter standoff 40 years ago in July 1953. But for many Americans, intriguing mysteries still surround that conflict, which took 3 million lives.Why did Communist China, its prestige on the line, finally...
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Garbage vs. Swill: The Difference Is a Pig
THE ever-increasing demands of my philosophic meditations perforce prevent me from addressing my talents to the many perplexities that vex our mismanaged world, but I find one that I can solve quickly without hampering the smooth flow of my other interests....
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Insensitivity Abounds in Film `Rising Sun'
MICHAEL CRICHTON'S novel "Rising Sun" stirred up a storm of controversy when it appeared. Some called it tough-minded and incisive. Others saw it as unmitigated Japan-bashing.Advance word on the movie indicated that the filmmakers were toning down any...
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IRS Weighs Tax Treatment of Toxic Cleanup Congress Wants Revenue, but Considers Effect on Environment
HOUSE and Senate conference committee members are now hashing out changes in many areas of the tax code, from the amortization of intangibles to the deduction for investment in Puerto Rico.Looming just over the horizon is an issue that dwarfs almost...
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Israeli Strikes Threaten Arab Role in Talks in Arab View, Vigorous Military Action in Lebanon Indicates Israel Intends to Force Its Terms on Its Neighbors
THE already shaky Middle East peace process is hanging in the balance as Israel continues its large-scale military assault against the pro-Iranian Hizbullah (Party of God) guerrillas in southern Lebanon.After implicitly supporting the Israeli strikes,...
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Israeli Supreme Court Overturns Demjanjuk Conviction
JOHN DEMJANJUK is a free man. In a surprise verdict yesterday, the Israeli Supreme Court acquitted on appeal the man who had been convicted and sentenced to death in April 1988 as being "Ivan the Terrible," the brutal operator of the Nazi gas chambers...
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Lebanese Flee Villages under Israeli Assault Forced Exodus to Beirut Is Israel's Aim; No Side Heeds US Call for Cease-Fire
MUSTAFA DARWISH was driving wounded neighbors and the remains of his son to the hospital when an Israeli rocket fired from a helicopter gunship landed near his car, and put him in a hospital himself.Lying in bed, his left leg bandaged and his white walrus...
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Loyal Serbs and Croats in Sarajevo See Woe in Partition of Bosnia FADING DREAM OF UNITY
FOR the first time since January, Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic sat down with his Serbian and Croatian counterparts in Geneva this week to seek an end to 16 months of ethnic fighting. But the news was hardly comforting for residents of this besieged...
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Michigan Seeks a New Strategy for Equity in School Funding Repealing Property-Tax Support for Education Puts State out on Limb
BY repealing all property-tax support for the state's public schools last week, Michigan suddenly leaped into the forefront of the nationwide school-finance debate.The legislature eliminated $5.6 billion in annual funding for schools but did not identify...
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New Mayor of St. Louis Gets His Feet Wet
THIS city has already withstood a succession of record crests on the Mississippi River and faces another next Tuesday. The prediction: 48 feet, just four feet below the concrete flood wall that protects low-lying parts of the downtown.As the crests flow...
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Olympic Countdown: Makeovers, Markups
WHEN the mascot for the 1996 Olympics was unveiled at the closing ceremonies of the '92 Barcelona Games, many who witnessed the debut found themselves asking, "What is it?"And that, apparently, is exactly what Atlanta's Olympic organizers anticipated...
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Perot's NAFTA Prophecy Not So Crazy
I agree with the author of the Opinion page article "Perot's Disservice to NAFTA's Opponents," July 20, that "there are legitimate reasons to challenge the North American Free Trade Agreement." But I am disenchanted by his willingness to disregard the...
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RAND Report Says Schools Not Educating Immigrants
America's schools get an "F" in their education of immigrants."The nation's public schools are failing the ... 2 million immigrant youth who arrived on our shores during the 1980s," concludes a new study by RAND, a nonprofit research organization.Lorraine...
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Small Gains in GDP May Finally Be Spurring Some Hiring
CONSUMERS dug their wallets out in the second quarter of 1993.As a result of the buying, the government reported the second quarter gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 1.6 percent, up from 0.7 percent in the first quarter.Although the improvement is...
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Stuff-Lover's Heaven
A WHILE back a friend sent my wife and me a Booth cartoon from the New Yorker magazine showing an older couple on a very cluttered front porch "just a-settin' there." Two people are passing on the sidewalk, and one remarks to the other, "He married her...
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Wanted: A Refuge from Interactive TV
LAST week USA Today published a thumbnail survey called "Do We REALLY Want to Interact with TV?" It found that 32 percent of adults in the United States said they'd be likely to suscribe to an interactive television system, with certain demographic groups...
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Where There Is Vision
IMAGINE that it's Sunday evening and you're just sitting down to relax in front of a program on television. As you tune in, these words appear on the screen: "Viewer Discretion Advised." Have you ever wondered what the networks mean by this warning?...
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World Demographic Shifts Signal Resource Crunch
HISTORY accelerates. Too often Americans focus on short-term change: change in taxes, change in budgets, change in first ladies' hair styles. Meanwhile, deeper forces of change sweep past with less notice, faster and faster.Consider these examples of...
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Worth Noting on TV
* FRIDAY</P><P>20/20 (ABC, 10-11 p.m.): Those toys you see kids playing with in the United States may be sold by American companies, but most of them are made in Asia. There, labor is cheap and working conditions - according to a segment...
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Yeltsin Eases Russia's Ruble Panic; Doubts Mount on His Leadership Controversy Underscores Deep Division within Cabinet over Reforms
THE lines of panicked savers have disappeared from in front of Russia's banks. But the political tremors triggered by the unpopular, and now partially aborted, currency reform announced July 24 have not abated.The currency affair has once again raised...
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