The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 30, 1995

Battling over History
WHEN national standards for teaching American and world history were published last November, they met a chorus of boos. Leading the chorus was Lynne Cheney, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities when funding for the project was approved...
Computer Systems Linked to Internet Face New Security Threat
Intruders have learned how to penetrate sophisticated barriers and "hijack" computer systems linked to the Internet, posing a vast new security threat on the global network, according to the government-financed Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT).Millions...
Conservative Democrats Join Republicans in Signs of a National Shift to the Right
LAST week demonstrated how much the political momentum has shifted to the right in the nation's capital. This week will begin to define the limits of that shift.The House's passage of a balanced-budget amendment was significant not only for the vote...
Cozying Up to a Camp without Conveniences
A DOZEN years ago, I came to Maine as a new bride. My husband, Gary, had just acquired the job of his dreams as a whitewater-rafting guide on the Kennebec River. But as spring and rafting season approached, we still had nowhere to live. Then, Gary's...
Crash of Flight 427 Could Speed Upgrade of Flight-Data Recorders
IN the annals of the National Transportation Safety Board, four airline accidents have never been solved. The investigative body is laboring hard to make sure that last September's crash of USAir Flight 427 doesn't become its fifth unsolved mystery....
Cuts at HUD: A Welcome Reform or a Threat to the Urban Poor?
IN granite-gray federal Washington, the Clinton administration proposes to reinvent public housing with an infusion of market forces and a huge shift toward local control.But in the brick apartment blocks of Boston, home to one of the nation's largest...
Dispute at Auschwitz Shows Fight against Intolerance Still Not Won
THE surrounding countryside is windswept, bleak, and uninviting this time of year. Within the barbed-wire confines the atmosphere can bring emotions that run from revulsion to anger.Such is Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Nazi death complex where up to 1.5 million...
Diversity -- or Divisiveness? US Focus on Race, Gender, Ethnicity Overlooks the Individual
NOT long ago, my daughter came home from school and asked for our national flag. Remembering a small Stars and Stripes that once marked my place at an international dinner, I fetched it and gave it to her."No!" she said, "that is the American flag. I...
Economists See Growth Slowing as US Rates Rise Federal Reserve Is Expected to Tap Monetary Brakes Again to Slow Down Speeding Economy
ECONOMISTS expect the Federal Reserve to shove interest rates onto the "up" escalator Wednesday. They aren't so sure, however, if this is the top floor for rates, or if they will go higher again in a month."The Fed can't be seen as inactive," says Lyle...
French Nod to Solo Quebec Boosts Separatist Leader in Run-Up to Referendum Visit to Paris by Province's Premier May Help Woo More 'Yes' Votes in Ballot Planned in Quebec Later This Year
QUEBEC Premier Jacques Parizeau arrived home from Paris Saturday in high spirits after receiving exactly what he went to France for -- a clear endorsement of his plan to hold a referendum in Quebec this year on whether the province should separate from...
God's Mastery of the Muscles Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
PEOPLE often put up with occasional aches and pains in the muscles as just part of "how things are." But we never have to accept pain--either occasional or chronic--as something we have to live with. There is a permanent remedy.This remedy goes deeper...
It's Futuristic, Fuel-Efficient, and Has an 'Ultralight' Touch Sleek, Energy-Saving Cars Are Product of Industry and Government Collaboration
A GROUP of third-graders darts past Secret Service agents to get a close look at the three futuristic cars sitting in the White House driveway."How do you get in, mister?" says a girl to a nearby man. "I'll show you, kids," he says, lifting the car's...
Kobe Shakeout: Officials Promise Quicker Response
CRISES can bring out the best and worst in people. After the giant earthquake that rocked the city of Kobe two weeks ago, Japan's government came across as slow and inept. But harsh criticism forced it to get ahead of the expensive task of rebuilding.Japan's...
Madame Tussaud Could Learn from Harlem Wax Artist Entrepreneur Brings His Brand of Self-Promotion to the Display of Important African-American Figures
In a Harlem neighborhood dotted with vacant houses, Raven Chanticleer has assembled a pantheon of black heroes and included himself on the roster.Here, in what is billed as the world's only African-American wax museum, he has sculpted greats such as...
Making Peace with A Pesky New Neighbor
IT was 80 degrees and very humid, and I was mowing the lawn in a long-sleeved shirt, heavy pants, high boots, and gloves. I was hot and uncomfortable, and could barely see through the fine mesh netting that covered my face. It was black-fly season in...
New York Bombing Trial of 12 Men Opens, Tests Civil War Sedition Law
DID 12 men -- mostly of Middle Eastern background -- conspire on their own to blow up the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels, the George Washington Bridge, and the United Nations? Or were the men political malcontents who were entrapped by an overzealous United...
Nike Regains Its Sales Footing Analysts Predict Record Sales Growth and a Bigger Slice of Athletic Shoe Market
WELCOME to Nike Inc., where athletics meets advertising around every corner.At the sprawling headquarters near Portland, Ore., buildings are named after sports heroes, ranging from iron-man pitcher Nolan Ryan to basketball great Michael Jordan. Dozens...
Soaring on Homemade Wings with Small-Plane Manufacturing Slowed by Threats of Liability Suits, Amateur Flight Enthusiasts Are Building Their Own Craft from Kits
SOME people defy blizzards and ice to climb mountains. Some shun domestic tranquility to pan for gold in Alaska. And others, like Norm DeWitt, buy a $50,000 airplane in a kit and spend 8-1/2 years assembling it in a garage.Mr. DeWitt, a computer consultant...
The War That Recast the World in January 1945, Hitler's Last Big Offensive Had Failed -- and Russia's Was about to Begin Series: COMMEMORATING THE FINAL YEAR: WORLD WAR II. Today the Monitor Begins a Yearlong Series Recalling the End World War II and Its Aftermath, Including Reproductions of Monitor Front Pages from 50 Years Ago
Fifty years ago, in late January 1945, the Allied armies on the Western front of Europe had overcome their greatest obstacle: They had crossed the English Channel. After that they had surged across France and liberated Belgium, Luxembourg, and part of...
Toward Budget Balance
THE current drive to reduce the size of the federal government, and the concept that a government should not spend more money than it takes in, are related but distinctly different ideas. The first is a decision to address a current need. The second...
US Hopes for Last-DitchTalks on China Piracy
China and the United States are still holding out hope for a last-minute compromise in their face-off over copyright piracy despite a collapse of talks in Beijing Saturday.Overshadowed by the growing threat of a trade war with the United States, China...
When Russia's Hard-Liners Speak, Yeltsin Listens in the Aftermath of Chechnya War, Reformers Find They Get Little Respect
THE banks of white telephones on Mark Urnov's desk peg him as a man of rank in the status-conscious world of Rus-sian officialdom. But in the course of a two-hour interview last Friday, not one of them rang -- even once.Mr. Urnov is head of the Russian...
Why Public Wants Welfare Reform Dependency Culture, Rather Than High Costs, Irk Americans about People Being on 'Dole'
AFTER a "welfare summit" that President Clinton summoned this weekend with a couple dozen governors and congressional leaders, the president cited welfare reform as the nation's most urgent business.He will get little argument on that from Republicans...
World Community Needs Courage, Say Leading Critics
AFTER being rebuffed by 60 nations, United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali has shelved efforts to mobilize a small peacekeeping force to protect a million Rwandans living in refugee camps in Zaire.The episode illustrates a salient point:...