The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 23, 1997

Argentine Youths Tune in to Tango Some 75 Percent of Teens Say Tango Is Tops, Sparking a Revival
Mariana Dragone, dark ponytail swinging, dances as though glued to Pedro Benavente. A teen, Ms. Dragone adores the tango. In his 20s, so does Mr. Benavente. They're not alone. Tango is back in fashion in Buenos Aires, and the under-30 crowd may...
A Snapshot of Photography's Revolutionary Early Days
Photography and Its Critics: A Cultural History, 1839-1900 By Mary Warner Marien Cambridge U. Press 222 pp., $55 It is commonplace to acknowledge that the computer revolution is fundamentally transforming our society. Time magazine articulated ...
A Truck Full of Dreams and Ice Creams
I could hardly believe my ears. But the music was unmistakable: a calliope rendition of "Turkey in the Straw," repeated over and over again, carried on the warm, still summer air. I was mowing the lawn when I heard it. And then I saw it: the white ...
Changes in Agribusiness May Quiet Predictions of Global Hunger
A bumper crop of winter wheat is bursting from silos across America's heartland and - along with big yields overseas - muting recent warnings of global hunger. The abundant harvests are raising world grain stocks from a record low last year of...
Congress Tries to Pare Auto-Insurance Costs
A bipartisan group in Congress has put forward a plan designed to cut Americans' auto-insurance rates by $45 billion a year - an average of $243 per driver. The proposal does that, say sponsors of the Auto Choice Reform Act, by giving drivers nationwide...
Curl Up in an Armchair and Plan Your Trip Travel Magazines Respond to Consumer Tastes Whether It's for Handy Tips or an Enjoyable Read
Armchair travel has never been so easy. From glossy magazines and Sunday newspaper travel sections to specialty newsletters and Web sites, travel publishing has diversified as never before. Whether you want to take your family to a dude ranch, search...
Ex-Marine Helps Plug Teacher Gap
In a dingy classroom on Chicago's West Side, a fan circulates warm, humid air as high school English teacher Phil Thomas paces beneath a sign that urges students to "ATTACK" the test. "If we give you a job, don't just do it - kill it," booms Mr. ...
Foreign Cash in Washington: America's Self-Inflicted Hazard
Americans seem surprised to find out that foreign countries and the citizens of those countries have been seeking to send money to influence United States politics - targeting even political parties! The Senate campaign-finance hearings have opened...
Germans' Conscience Wants to Be a Guide President Herzog, on US Visit, Takes Job from Ribbon Cutting to Bully Pulpit
When German President Roman Herzog arrives in Washington, he will have no military review on the tarmac and no state dinner at the White House - just a small luncheon with President Clinton July 24. Why? The White House owes Germany a state visit,...
How Foreign Powers Nudge US Policy While Senate Looks for Illegal Acts, Some 595 Lobbyists Legally Influence Washington
You can count on it. Every day, somewhere in the world, officials of some foreign government are itching to influence the way the US makes decisions - and are willing to pay American citizens to help them get what they want. There's nothing illegal...
In the Middle of the Storm Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
What if you received an invitation from a friend to go on a cruise at sea, but heard that a storm was brewing? You might be afraid, maybe wonder if you should go. Now consider the same invitation, only this time you are assured that there are...
Met Galleries Steep Visitors in Chinese Aesthetic
The newly extended and refurbished Chinese galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York do more than assemble masterpieces spanning 13 centuries. They immerse visitors in a Chinese artistic aesthetic, which bears as much resemblance to...
Mormon Trail Journey Honors Historic Trek of Faithful
For the past three months, Kathy Stickel and Sarah Robinson have shared a one-room apartment with no gas or water, surrounded by bales of hay and jars of horse liniment. The walls are rusting and the four-legged neighbors are noisy, but the view...
Mormon Trek Now Has a Global Reach
In the late afternoons, Osamu Sekiguchi could usually be found under a shady tree writing about his day's journey on his solar-powered, lap-top computer. Mr. Sekiguchi, his wife, and two children - converts to Mormonism from Japan - walked 1,100...
Now a National Treasure, Tango Dances into Heart of Its Homeland the Dance Is Gaining Respect as a Symbol of Argentine Identity
A packed restaurant in a working-class neighborhood. The balding owner serves plates of steak and empanadas as the crowd thickens and the night deepens. After 1 a.m., a guitarist enters, sits down near the bar. He strums. Suddenly, the owner belts...
Olympic Ads for Beer Collide with Utah's Mormon Morals Salt Lake's Olympic Committee Considers Beer-Ad Ban for the 2002 Winter Games
In a time when endorsement contracts have become a vital part of the Olympic Games' financial success, the 2002 Winter Games may find that an official alcohol sponsor is more trouble than it's worth. A move to ban alcohol advertising during the...
One Man's Political Paintings Depict Tango's Passionate Past
For painter Ricardo Carpani, today's youths could never capture the essence of tango, an art form indelibly, painfully embedded in the history of his country. Bushy graying eyebrows arched, eyes flashing frustration, Mr. Carpani speaks of a political...
Recession for Russia? Sounds like Good News
What would look like a recession in the West, feels like relief in</P><P> Russia. After seven years of retrenchment, the Russian economy finally looks poised for turnaround. For the first half of this year, says a Western economist, the ...
Russia, the Space-Race Tortoise, Rockets Ahead Mir May Still Be in Trouble. but One Joint Russian Launch Venture Already Has an Order Backlog of $3 Billion
To anyone watching, the beleaguered Mir space station seems a galactic metaphor for what's happening to the Russian space program here on Earth. Mir has been beset by breakdowns that have delayed its repair since an unmanned cargo ship rammed it...
S. Korea Looks for Mr. Right MR. CLEAN VS. MR. STRONG
Leading South Korea can be a daunting task these days. Promoting domestic reconciliation, steering economic restructuring, and facilitating a peaceful reunification with North Korea loom large on the president's "to-do" list. So with presidential...
The News in Brief
The US US Rep. Tom DeLay (R) of Texas was under pressure to resign as House majority whip, but an aide said he would not. Delay also reportedly faced the possibility of a no-confidence vote when House Republicans caucused privately today. Of GOP...
The Trials of Monitoring Young Democracies FOREIGNERS WHO WATCH ELECTIONS
How do you define a free and fair election? * In Bosnia last September, indicted war criminals roamed free, intimidating potential voters at will. Somehow, 104 percent of the voters went to the polls. * In Croatia last month, not only did incumbent...
Toward Peace in the Caucasus
Why should the United States care about faraway Armenia and Azerbaijan? The answer is that we have important interests there. We have long-standing ties of friendship and kinship with the Armenian people. We want to help end the nine-year-old conflict ...
Ulster: Time to Push On
In Northern Ireland's slow-motion struggle between Protestants and Catholics, the short term seems always with us. The long term - peaceful settlement - appears to recede just out of reach as the two sides wrestle for advantage. Once more, that...
Unpopular in Peru
President Alberto Fujimori of Peru has built a political career on toughness with the violent guerrilla movements that beset his country. His popularity soared when Peruvian forces ended a hostage crisis at the Japanese embassy in Lima earlier this...
Wall Street's Bulls Send the Bears on a Rampage in Asia
How much is a dollar worth? The answer used to be simple in countries like Thailand and the Philippines. Monetary authorities in southeast Asia saw to it that the dollar's value stayed fairly constant in their countries, despite the greenback's...
Why It's Important to Undo Cambodia's Coup Illegal Hun Sen Power Grab Can Be Reversed by a World Community That Pays 60 Percent of the Bills
Pragmatism is a great quality in political life. But the international community usually gets into trouble when, in the name of pragmatism, it chooses expediency and fudges on its promises in crisis situations. Invariably it ends up with much greater...