The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 6, 1996

Aideed's Son Is X-Factor in Somalia's Equation FORMER US MARINE CHOSEN
Somali warlord Mohamed Farah Aideed has died, but the factional fighting that has plunged his country into civil war, famine, and virtual anarchy is unlikely to end soon, political analysts say. Over the weekend, Mr. Aideed's supporters named his...
A Shot in the Dark? Antigun Lobby in Britain Aims for Ban on Handguns
Britain's million-strong gun lobby is fighting a rear-guard battle to retain the right to own and use handguns, but senior political sources say the government appears likely to order a nationwide ban before the end of the year. Fueled by the massacre...
Atlanta Games: What's the Environmental Score? despite Some Highly Visible Efforts, the Conservation Record Has Been Mixed
As departing athletes pack up their treasures of gold, environmentalists wonder whether the Centennial Games will go down in history as successfully in "green." Environmental concerns are now an integral part of Olympic planning. Changes made to...
Burundi's Big Neighbors Cut Trade to Try to Strangle Tutsi-Led Coup
Less than two weeks after Army Maj. Pierre Buyoya seized power in a bloodless coup in Burundi, economic sanctions imposed by regional leaders have begun to bite. Some gas stations closed, and others limited sales as fuel shipments from neighboring...
Campaign Strategy from a Veteran Observer
Just for fun I'm going to play the role of a political consultant to both presidential candidates. The subject is "How to Win." So first, here goes with my unsolicited advice for Bill Clinton: My message to you, Mr. President, is short and sweet....
Clinton's Terrorism Offensive Sparks Criticism
President Clinton is finding himself frustrated at home and abroad as he pursues new powers to fight terrorism. Conservative Republicans concerned with excessive government intrusion have blocked congressional approval of stronger wiretapping authority....
Dole Tax-Cut Plan: Does It Add Up? Proposal May Energize GOP, but Not Close Gap
If nothing else, Bob Dole's effort to revive his campaign with a big tax-cut proposal could energize the GOP voter base heading into next week's party convention. But whether the proposal unveiled yesterday in Chicago - highlighted by a 15 percent...
Fine Choices Abound at Lincoln Center Festival the New Summer Gala Aims to Be New York's Most Important and Eclectic Arts Series, Wooing Tourists and Locals Alike
Launching a world-class summer arts festival is a huge challenge. Lean too much toward high culture, and you'll lose audiences who want the equivalent of beach-blanket reading. Lean too much toward low culture, and folks might simply choose a Hollywood...
Hispanics and Asians Change the Face of American South
In Decatur, Ala., population 56,000, the Food World grocery stocks dried fish and seaweed. In Atlanta, a directory contains 116 pages of groups that cater to Asian-Americans. And here in Kernersville, N.C., a sleepy Southern town whose homes have...
How Do Meteoroids Become Meteorites?
Meteors start out as bits and pieces of passing comets, asteroids, and even our moon and planets. When they get knocked off their parent object, they continue to orbit the sun. In space, they are known as meteoroids. Earth plows through batches of...
How to Find Lawyers and Use Their Services ATTORNEY CHASING
Need a lawyer? In New York City, you can call the local bar association. A representative will listen to your concerns and either suggest a course of action, or, if needed, refer you to an attorney. "We receive over 100,000 calls a year and refer...
Israel's 'Culture War' Heats Up in Jerusalem Secular Jews Try to Counter Growing Influence of the Religious Right, Whose Vision of Israel Includes Observance of Strict Jewish Law
The battle lines for control of Jerusalem's Bar-Ilan street had already been drawn: Lining the road were thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews, sweltering in the heat under traditional broad-brimmed black hats and thick, long coats, as they tried to block...
Meteors!
There's a truly gnarly show this Sunday night (Aug. 11). It starts kind of late, and it's kind of long. But it's rated G, and you can see it from your backyard. You could call the show "The Night of the Perseids." It stars hundreds of tiny actors...
Mostar Standoff Casts Shadow over US Troop Exit and Bosnian Election
The war that started in 1993 between the Muslims and Croats in the southwestern Bosnian town of Mostar had finally stopped. With joint Muslim-Croat police patrols and inter-ethnic trade, the rivals had begun to bridge the divide between them - a divide...
Push for Safer Bike Hits Rough Road SEEING THE LIGHT
Uncle Sam wants to know if bicycles glow enough in the dark. No, this doesn't mean all bikes may soon look like your kid's "Rad Thrasher" model, with its neon-lime paint visible from the moon. But it does mean that the federal government is studying...
Rag-Top Review
There's nothing quite like driving a convertible to bring on the free and easy feeling of summertime. With the top down, nature and the world feel close at hand. At 55 miles an hour, a "stroll" through woods, hills, and fields can go on for a hundred...
'Resource' for Developing Countries: Increase Energy Efficiency It Costs about Half as Much as Building New Power Plants
Energy efficiency traditionally has been regarded as something only rich economies could afford. But given today's tremendous energy needs in the developing world, especially in Pacific Asia, it has taken on a new importance. Energy efficiency has...
Revolt against 'Right-to-Die' Movement Critics Marshal Arguments against Doctor-Assisted Suicide
The "right to die" cause is building legal and popular momentum, with two federal courts recently allowing physician-assisted suicide and with polls showing 73 percent of Americans approve of the practice. Despite public sympathy for what is a wrenching...
The Rationality of Gardening Economics Can't Explain Why We Plant and Harvest
Is it rational for me to grow, in my garden, my own vegetables and herbs? I ask myself this as I contemplate the fortifications I have erected around my recuperating stand of basil and around my two remaining pumpkins. Furtive and voracious groundhogs...
UN Reform, a la Carte
If he were a CEO, UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali would have been fired long ago. Early in his tenure, the secretary-general set the stage for the failed Somalia operation with his Agenda for Peace, a naive blueprint for sending United ...
Worth Noting on TV
WEDNESDAY Britannia: Palace at Sea (PBS, 8-9 p.m.): Spend an evening with the British monarchy, beginning with this well-done documentary that takes a peek inside the floating palace before the royal yacht hangs up its sails forever. Britannia is...