The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 28, 1997

Conversations with Outstanding Americans: Sandra Day O'Connor Elected in 1981 as the First Woman to Sit on the Supreme Court, Justice O'Connor Has Proved to Be Both a Pragmatic, Conservative Voice and a Coalition-Builder. Her "Swing Vote" Has Often Tilted Major Rulings. Series: O'Connors Main Impact Is in the Area of Reproductive Rights, Church and State and Race. BY MELANIE STETSON FREEMAN - STAFF. 2) HISTORIC DAY: O'Connor Is Sworn Is by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Sept. 25, 1981, as Her Husband, John, Looks on. MICHAEL EVANS/UPI. 3) THE HIGH COURT,1994 : Clarence Thomas, Antonin Scalia, O'Connor, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Stephen Breyer, John Paul Steven, William Rehnquist, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. KEN HEINEN/ AP. 4) FOREIGN MATTERS: O'Connor, Meeting Visiting Bosnian Judges Last Month (above), Actively Backs an Independent Judiciary in East Europe. TYLER MALLORY/AP
BySandra Day O'Conner inhabits one of the loftiest spots in American law. As the third-senior member of the Supreme Court, the former ranch girl from Arizona who used to "get up at 3 a.m. and be in the saddle by sunup," as she puts it, has more than...
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Diamonds Are a Super Bowl Winner's Best Friend
The talk before and after Sunday's Super Bowl game was about rings, not greenbacks.Not that Green Bay's $48,000-per-player payoff for winning wasn't alluring. It's just that pro football players fixate on championship jewelry in a big way.A sample from...
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Digital Camcorders May Bring out the Spielberg in All of Us
The consumer canon dictates that innovations at the high-end eventually find their way into the mainstream. If it flies off the shelves at Neiman Marcus, sooner or later you're going to find it at Wal-Mart.That process is about to take place with home...
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Ex-Dissident's Visit Is Mirror on Changes for Russia's Jews Sharansky, Now an Israeli Minister, Finds Life Improved for Jews
After nine years in prison, much of it in solitary confinement and punishment cells, Natan Sharansky finally escaped Russia in a 1986 prisoner swap on a bridge in Berlin.This most famous Soviet refusenik returned to Russia for the first time yesterday...
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Florida Fights to Save Crown Jewel RANCOR OVER A REEF
Adrift off the indigo edge of the Gulf Stream, fisherman Jim Cass squints at a distant group of tourists as they spill from a dive boat into the warm waters off Key West."They have no idea they're snorkeling over dead corals," Mr. Cass says with a mirthless...
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Football's Defining 'Super' Moments Cut Both Ways
Eyes forward, pads off, lips pursed, ringed by minicams and sound booms, covered in a glaze of sweat, the black gunk under his eyes moistened by tears, Drew Bledsoe marches into the windowless press room at the Louisiana Superdome and climbs up to podium...
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Forget Cooking: These Women's Tools Were Made for Fighting Russian Dig Reveals Life of Female Warriors
On the windswept steppes of southern Russia, broad, low mounds of earth gently rise from a bleak landscape, marking the seasonal ebb and flow of ancient nomads.Beneath many of these burial mounds lie the remains of what appear to be female warriors dating...
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Genetically Engineered Plants Are Safe - and Necessary Bioextremist Forces Have Created Unwarranted Public Anxiety
A regulatory nightmare that kept this year's American corn harvest from Europe's markets ended last month when the European Union reversed itself and approved a new breed of genetically engineered corn for sale in Europe.That there was any controversy...
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Health Care Gaps Highlight Divide in Party Priorities Democrats Push Insurance for Poor Children
Health care reform - a significant issue in the last Congress - is moving to the top of the American agenda again.This time around, the changes are coming in smaller packages, but they still point up major differences between the two parties.The Republicans...
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How Sharp Is Your News Noggin?
These questions are based on stories printed in Monitors dated Jan. 21 through 24.1. The dog who plays Wishbone in the PBS-TV children's series of the same name is a Jack Russell terrier. What is the dog actor's real name?A. Soccer B. Jill C. Felice...
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Investing Overseas Balances Portfolio It's a Good Time to Diversify Abroad, Brokers Say
With American stock indexes near record levels yet showing signs of weakness, some experts say it's time to consider offsetting domestic stocks with overseas investments.A number of brokerage houses are making this case."We believe that portfolio managers...
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Is Sickness Inevitable? Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Not long ago my local newspaper had a whole section discussing how to survive the cold and flu season. Often the conclusion is that sickness is inevitable. But this doesn't have to be. How do I know? Because I have been able to prove it on more than...
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Letters
Uzbekistan Not Just Cozying Up to USThe Jan. 14 article, "Critics in a Central Asian State Ask for Reality Check on Rights," suggests the government of Uzbekistan advances human rights in order to be "paid off" by Western countries. This refers to President...
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Life 'Out There': Lots of Hype, Little Evidence
It's fun to speculate about life on Mars, on Jupiter's watery moon Europa, or around other stars. But if we expect too much too soon by way of actual discovery, the fun could turn to boredom.That would be bad news for the US National Aeronautics and...
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Moscow Tries to Tap Mideast Ties for Peace
Now that the bottleneck in the Mideast peace process over the West Bank town of Hebron has been unclogged, there are hopes that the momentum will restart other tracks on the road to regional detente. That includes parts of the peace process that were...
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New Worry on Police Blotters: Rise in Rapes
The dramatic decline in violent crime that cities are experiencing from coast to coast has one stubborn exception - rape.In many cities, the number of rapes reported in 1996 stayed the same or even increased at a time when murders dropped by as much...
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O Volunteers!
When a galaxy of former US presidents summiteer with the incumbent in April, no one will be laughing at George Bush's "thousand points of light."That was Mr. Bush's mocked metaphor for a nationwide network of charitable organizations shining "in a broad...
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Rwanda's Bind: Trying Children for Genocide Prosecuting More Than 2,000 Minors Raises Acute Moral Problem
Claude is like most other eight-year-old boys. He likes a good game of soccer and a cuddle from his mother.But the boy is not a typical youngster. He is accused of taking part in Rwanda's genocide, murdering his neighbors by throwing a grenade into their...
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The Bible as a Model for Democracy Was Socrates More of a Bolshevik?
The next-to-last Congress of the 20th century was gaveled into session earlier this month.Had this been two Januarys ago when a group of fire-breathing Republicans was first charging on to Capitol Hill after a 40-year exile in the minority, the occasion...
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The News in Brief
THE USGreen Bay, Wis., embraced its Packers with a homecoming parade and rally after the team's 35-21 Super Bowl win over the New England Patriots. President Clinton congratulated the winners by telephone and praised the game's most valuable player,...
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This Just In: It Didn't Happen
When I was just starting this column in December 1971, I remember saying to one of my Monitor colleagues: "How in the world am I going to keep this going, week after week?" That concern never really leaves you. "What to write about? What to write about?"...
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White House Strives to Repair Tattered Relations with Press Many in the Media, Too, Take Steps to Give Clinton 'A Bit More Room'
The White House's newfound outreach to former adversaries - bestowing the Presidential Medal of Freedom on former Republican Sen. Bob Dole and inviting ex-President Bush to the White House last week - is also being extended to its arch nemesis: the press.Like...
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Yuppies, Miners Do Battle in West New Development versus Gold Tradition
Like much of the West, Colorado was built upon the dream of gold. But a century later, the quest for a precious commodity of a different sort is luring urban refugees to former mining towns in the Rocky Mountains.The new West pioneers arrive here seeking...
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