The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 25, 1998

1998 To-Do List
Gulf War 1-1/2 is off for now. The Lewinsky et al. case is in the hands of more lawyers than Brooks Brothers stocks ties for. And Congress is back in the spotlight.It's an election year. It's a budget surplus year. So what should Congress have on its...
Advanced New Observatory Targets the Elusive Neutrino the Particle May Hold Clues to Origins of the Universe
It may be the most common particle in the universe. Constantly whizzing through every corner of the cosmos, the neutrino - first identified more than 30 years ago - would be expected by now to have given up most of its secrets. But it is still one of...
A Matter of Life and Death Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
The world would be better off without dictators. That's a statement few people in democratic societies would argue with. Many of those people sometimes contend that the death of certain dictators offers the only resolution to the problems their actions...
Brewing a Tempest in a Coffee Cup A Starbucks Shop in Cambridge, Mass., Is Target of Protesters Who Don't Want to Swallow Rules of Capitalism
There's a proud history of throwing the rascals out in this oh-so-liberal bastion near Boston.George Washington began his rout of the British here in 1775. Nearly two centuries later, in 1966, an antiwar mob sent Defense Secretary Robert McNamara scurrying...
Changing Alaska Won't Stand for Cruel Treatment of Wolves New Program to Sterilize Key Wolves in a Remote Area Contrasts with Harsh Wolf Control of the Past
It used to be that when Alaskans talked of "wolf control," they meant targeted killing - at times by skimming over the landscape in an airplane and simply shooting the animals with rifles.Today, many Alaskans won't stand for such practices, which they...
Dad Tries Not to Steal the Stanzas
I could hardly believe it. A flier for a poetry recital. In this day and age. And it came out of my son's school backpack.Should I have been so surprised at this? After all, poetry is good stuff. I have made it a policy that every other book I read should...
Detective Story: Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls? Scholar's Controversial New Claims Trigger a Big Debate over Fundamental Aspects of Judeo-Christian History
Archaeologists dig to shed new light on the past. But Yitzhar Hirschfeld's latest excavation casts an essential page of the Judeo-Christian past in a different light altogether, leaving critics crying sensationalism - or overenthusiasm.At stake are the...
Energy-Leaking Appliances Are Never Really 'Off'
Your house "leaks" electricity: The cordless drill in the basement. The television set, computer printer, garage-door opener. Even an electric toothbrush wastes energy while it sits doing nothing.The leakage from any one appliance is usually negligible....
Gratitude for a Spring Soak
Spring rain fell hard. So did I. Raindrops rippled the water running down the river and the water running in all the ditches. I spread bigger ripples in the big ditch up near the west boundary of the ranch.I rode the small motorcycle across the river...
Help Wanted for Armenia
President Levon Ter-Petrossian's resignation this month marks the lowest point of a steady decline in the health of the Armenian republic. The most progressive of Soviet republics under Mikhail Gorbachev, Armenia's post-Soviet record has been marred...
Iraq Deal: Saddam Buys Time Renewed UN Inspections This Week, but No Curbs on Iraqi Leader's Ambitions
When it comes to Saddam Hussein, US policymakers can be sure of one thing: He'll be back.That means another confrontation with Iraq that takes the United States to the brink of war, and perhaps beyond, is almost inevitable, say experts.The deal cut between...
Iraq: What Next? on Saddam's Part, Little Evidence of a Spirit of Compliance
The agreement reached by President Saddam Hussein of Iraq and United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan evoked a worldwide sigh of relief and a burst of hope. No one wanted bombing and killing, nor the opening of another Pandora's box. Yet, there is...
Job Machine Hits Higher Gear in Latest Sign of Prosperity, Living Standards Rise as Record Number of Adults Find Work
The United States has reached a new economic threshold: Proportionately more American adults are working than at any time in history.Moreover, their wages have gone up enough to substantially beat inflation. As a result, living standards are rising -...
Keeping Statistics Honest
Chicken Little would have something new to squawk about today: Prices are falling! Prices are falling!Last week the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) said prices at the producer level fell 0.7 percent in January, and were 1.8 percent lower than a year...
Peace Feelers Creep across Korea's Divide A New South Korean President, Kim Dae Jung, Takes Office Feb. 25. Already He and North Korea Are Hinting at Warmer Ties
When Kim Dae Jung is sworn in as president Feb. 25, South Korea will celebrate its first peaceful transfer of power in more than 50 years and look to the veteran dissident to lead the country out of an acute financial crisis.About 150 miles north, the...
Romania: A Journey through the Ages Transylvania Offers Vistas of Castles, Rural Folk Culture
We had stopped the car once again on account of livestock in the road, this time for sheep that were in no hurry to make their crossing.One oversized ram turned out to be the shepherd dressed in a sheepskin cloak that covered him from head to shin. He...
Safety from Man-Eaters India's Reserves Save Tigers - Too Well for People Who Live near the Big Cats and Must Save Themselves
Across India, maharajahs who once ruled vast tracts of this country still celebrate tiger hunting of yore. These princes often display stuffed cats and yellowed photographs of successful hunts in their palaces. Villager Joy Kumar Mondal wears his tiger...
Spin Doctor to Polish the Crown Post-Diana PR
Try ringing Buckingham Palace in London (930-4832) and asking what Queen Elizabeth II likes to eat for breakfast.The answer to that, and most other questions, will be: "I'm terribly sorry. We don't provide information on such matters."But the tradition...
Texas Politician Stokes National Morality Debate
Tom Pauken, a candidate for Texas attorney general, was finishing a conversation with a reporter last week about the drug issue, when he got personal. "By the way," he said, "I myself have never used illegal drugs."That's when the frenzy began. Reporters...
The Cat in the Hat Throws a Party to Get Kids to Read Celebrating with Dr. Seuss
There won't be any Sneetches or Grinches crashing this birthday party. It will be Lorna Heilbronner and her retired friends serving up cake and Dr. Seuss in a mobile-home park in Eugene, Ore. And it will be businessmen dishing out Green Eggs and Ham...
The Man Who Would Be Germany's Next Chancellor A State Election on Sunday Could Decide Who Faces the Long-Reigning Kohl This Fall
Tine & the Orions, a four-piece band, strikes up a jazzy tune as the candidate enters the packed community hall in this industrial town in northern Germany. Cheers go up and onlookers stand to catch a glimpse as he passes to the front of the hall with...
The News in Brief
The USThe US will work to close "any possible loopholes" in the weapons-inspection deal between the UN and Iraq, Secretary of State Albright told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. She said Iraqi President Saddam Hussein would not be allowed "to...
This Winter's Fashion Fetish: Pashminas Americans Catch the Craze for These Delicate Woolen Shawls Made from the Fur of Nepalese Mountain Goats
In a cold, dank, shed-like factory here, Nepalese men with gnarled fingers work antiquated wooden looms, squinting at woolen threads that slowly form one seamless piece. Thanks to the meticulous handwork, it will take 98 workers an entire day to make...
Trying to Blunt Twisters' Destruction Predicting Tornadoes like Those in Florida Is Hard, but Warning Times Are Improving
Scott Singleton had just moved with his daughter from Ohio to a three-bedroom home in Lakeside Estates in Kissimmee, Fla. He had seen the tornado-watch warnings on television Feb. 22. But like most residents here, he didn't expect it would hit in the...
US 12th-Graders Miss the Mark Scores in Science and Math below World Average and Lowest in Advanced Studies
The grades are just in for the world's biggest math and science exam, and they don't look good for United States students or the schools that educate them.American 12th-graders scored well below the world average in the Third International Mathematics...
Venture Capitalism for the Third World? UN Gives It a Try
Unlikely venture capitalists they may be, but one branch of the United Nations has discovered that a little entrepreneurial spirit goes a long way.As government development aid declines worldwide, the United Nations Development Program increasingly looks...
What 'Family Values' Means in Indonesia
On March 11 the Indonesian People's Consultative Assembly is expected to reelect President Suharto for a seventh five-year term and to confirm an aircraft engineer, B.J. Habibie, as vice president. The assembly's decision is not in doubt: One-half of...