The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 2, 2000

After the Flood: Hope in Venezuela ; after Torrential Rains Six Months Ago, Enough Mud Covered Vargas State to Build Six Giza Pyramids
Eight-foot-high mud banks festoon Elio Marchesano's seaside barber shop like some kind of macabre garland. Here, he offers $3 haircuts to the few customers still around and laments how little is being done to resurrect this town nearly wiped out by last...
Bearing Up as Stocks Dip
Technology stocks put on a peacock-type display Wednesday. The Nasdaq Composite Index rose a record 7.94 percent. The Dow Jones Industrial Average, with its blue-chip companies, did pretty well too. Is it time to jump back into the stock market? Predicting...
Bush's Way: Texas-Style Teamwork ; Bush Is Friendly with Texas Democrats, but Consensus-Building Is Harder in Washington
In 1998, El Paso Mayor Carlos Ramirez did what many fellow Democrats consider to be unforgivable. He endorsed Gov. George W. Bush (a Republican!) over Democrat Garry Mauro, helping Mr. Bush to become the first GOP governor in history to win El Paso County....
Chastity Tests: Unusual Tool for Public Health
In township churches, remote grassy fields, and rural community centers across South Africa, thousands of children are being asked to prove they have preserved what many view as their country's greatest defense against AIDS: their virginity. The chaste...
'Contact' Sport: Tony's Tussle over Musical Categories ; Broadway's Best Compete for Awards Sunday
"Art" is on display in Washington, D.C. "Titanic" sinks eight times a week in Green Bay, Wis. "Miss Saigon" has taken up residence in Birmingham, Ala. And in Columbus, Ohio, they're fighting "The Civil War." All these shows were launched on Broadway,...
Disputed Drama Leads Cannes Quest in US
Some movies positively fly from the Cannes Film Festival to American theaters, and some are already on US screens when the festival unveils them - like "Mission to Mars" and "I Dreamed of Africa," which had their European premires at Cannes last month....
Double-Dealing Lawmakers ; States Need Tougher Ethical Codes for Legislators
Ethics in government often involves the avoidance of what could appear unethical. That's why the largely unregulated flow of money into campaigns raises eyebrows among many Americans. The question inevitably arises: To what extent is such money purchasing...
Elian Case Reaffirms Parent Rights ; US Court Removes a Major Hurdle to the Boy's Return to Cuba with His Dad
Elian Gonzalez will return to Cuba. It may not happen immediately, but that prospect is considerably closer now that a federal appeals court in Atlanta has ruled that the boy's father has the legal authority to decide where and how his son should be...
Fiery Plunge Keys Debate over Ending Space Missions ; NASA Is Scrapping a Space Telescope This Weekend, but Critics Say It's Too Soon
On Sunday, a unique space telescope that looks like a giant metallic fly will plunge into the Pacific Ocean, ending a nine-year run of cosmic discoveries. But behind its fiery descent looms an arcane but important question for the National Aeronautics...
'Frasier' Analyzes Dark of 'Macbeth'
Kelsey Grammer has decided to spend his summer vacation from TV's best comedy ("Frasier") wandering onstage as one of Shakespeare's most tormented characters. Lacing up the boots of "Macbeth" is no small step for any actor. But Mr. Grammer brings bona...
Freedom's Struggles Win Screen Time at Filmfest
It's a busy season for filmfests, with Cannes just concluded and various others to come, but few will spotlight more intensely serious movies than the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival, now in its 11th year. Dedicated to "viewpoints of...
Get Real ; Who Needs Actors When Shows Can Film the Intimate Dramas of Real Lives?
It's everywhere - game shows, daytime talk shows, "amazing" home videos, wild-animal attacks, and "Cops." Reality TV comes unscripted, actor-free, usually videotaped and highly edited. One form or another of it is on most channels every day of the week....
Global Warming Thins Arctic Ozone Layer ; New Study Suggests That Attack on Earth's Protective Shield Is Spreading
Scientists announced this week they have found the most conclusive evidence yet that greenhouse gases are causing a thinning of the Arctic ozone layer. For years, scientists have known that there is a hole in the Antarctic ozone layer - which protects...
His Curiosity Made Him King of the Hill
On the 15th anniversary of his arrival at CNN, the man whose suspenders and curious nature are known the world round, says of his first spot on what was then a five-year-old upstart cable network: "I'll never forget that night. Mario Cuomo was the guest....
In Spring, My Garage Is Their Garage
Way back behind the gas cans and bicycles, above the busted rakes and shovels, a mud nest hangs from a ceiling joist in our garage. It has hung there for three years. And the engineers that built it are on their way back from the southern plains of Argentina....
Keep Mainstream Flicks out of Film Festivals
I take strong issue to David Sterritt's May 26 article "Cannes ignores Hollywood at its own peril." He reports that "a pressing question has arisen with increasing frequency: Where are the big Hollywood pictures that just about everyone, from industry...
Korean Protests against US Troops Grow Louder ; an Investigation of a Bombing at a US Firing Range South of Seoul Finds No Wrongdoing
Five days a week for the past 49 years, American warplanes have bombed a little island not one mile from Chon Man Kyu's home. And after years of complaining about the shock waves and noise from the training facility, Mr. Chon finally has the South Korean...
Mighty US Has Little Leverage on Russia ; No Arms Deal Is Likely, but Summit Offers Chance to Rebuild Strained Relations
It will be a meeting of contrasts - between an incoming and an outgoing president, between a listener and a talker, and between a country at the peak of its power and one trying to climb out of a long decline. Yet, the summit in Moscow this weekend...
No Common Agenda for Moscow ; Clinton Arrives Tomorrow for Talks with President Putin on Issues That Sharply Divide the US and Russia
President Clinton, nearing the end of his term, arrives in Moscow this weekend for a three-day summit with Russia's ambitious new leader, Vladimir Putin. While the chances for substantive progress on the key issues of nuclear arms control and global...
Nothing but the Truth ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
A friend of mine was driving on a rainy day last fall. As she braked at a traffic light, her car slowly skidded on wet leaves and gently but noticeably bumped into the car ahead of her. No one was injured. There was no evidence of damage to either vehicle,...
On the Field or Court, Silence Is Golden
Most of the evolution of sports is welcome. The athletes generally are far better than in decades past because of advances in nutrition, coaching, training, psychology, facilities, equipment. But for all these advances in sport, a serious negative is...
Peru's Dark Future
Peruvians went to the polls last Sunday in what should have been an opportunity to exercise their democratic rights. Instead the elections will be remembered as the day Peru's democracy died. How is it that President Alberto Fujimori won a third five-year...
Prime Time: One Long Commercial
It seems logical to me that sometime in the not-too-distant future, TV will give up its increasingly feeble efforts at creativity and become a huge electronic shopping mall. We already have the Disney Channel, so don't be surprised if you click on the...
Secret-Evidence Laws May Crumble in Light of Day ; COURTS AND LAWMAKERS ARE CLOSELY SCRUTINIZING PRACTICE OF DETAINING IMMIGRANTS WITHOUT TELLING THEM WHY
Hany Kiareldeen still has flashbacks of the morning two years ago when federal agents stormed into his electronics shop in Passaic, N.J., handcuffed him, and detained him for what would become 19 months in jail - all on the basis of secret evidence....
Sports 101
His teammates call him "el enano," Spanish for "the dwarf." And Atlanta Braves manager Bobby Cox says, "This kid is legit. He's a player who can help us win." His name is Rafael Furcal, and the gifted rookie is the new full- time shortstop for the Atlanta...
Strong Women Show Courage under Fire
Two of Hollywood's finest actresses present the most involving, strong-minded women of the summer season in gripping TV movies. Academy Award-winner Holly Hunter ("The Piano") plays a coal miner's wife who fights for her community in "Harlan County War,"...
The Monitor Movie Guide
Red stars denote the reviews of Monitor movie critic David Sterritt unless otherwise noted. Ratings and comments by the Monitor panel ( blue stars) reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs,...
Today's Story Line
Two world leaders, passing each other in the revolving door of power, will meet in Moscow this weekend. Presidents Clinton and Putin will discuss their differences over nuclear arms and terrorism. In post-diluvial Venezuela, political and bureaucratic...
USA
Elian Gonzalez is not entitled to an asylum hearing, a federal appeals court in Atlanta ruled, rejecting requests from the boy's Miami relatives. A three-judge panel affirmed a March ruling that the boy's father, who wants to take his six-year-old son...
Vast, Inventive Spoleto Is Arts Feast
Ada. Dark. Lofty. Proud. Daughter of the King of Ethiopia. This is not the Ada of the Metropolitan Opera, nor the principal character in the Disney Broadway musical "Aida." This is an Ada in miniature - approximately three feet tall - surrounded by a...
What Moscow Wants from 'Summit'
Attend a couple of the high-level administration briefings on the upcoming Clinton-Putin meeting in Moscow, and you'll come away with a new phenomenon that might be called "negative hype." The emphasis is on lowering expectations. You're admonished not...
Why a Staunch Republican Saved Democratic Seeds
Being a Grand Army of the Republic veteran of the Civil War, my grandfather was ipso facto a Republican, confirmed and irrevocable. The Republican Party was founded by free-thinking Mainers, and Abraham Lincoln was their patron saint and their fair-haired...
World
There is no hope for peace in the Middle East unless eastern Jerusalem becomes "the capital of a Palestinian state," Yasser Arafat told interviewers. The Palestinian Authority chief also said he'd reject any solution that does not permit the return of...