The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 9, 2000

A County and Town Sue to Halt Building of a 50,000-Person Office- Park 'City.'
It's always been difficult to know where Silicon Valley starts, or ends. Traveling south to Coyote Valley, though, a passage occurs. Suburban tract developments and sprawling office parks suddenly give way to rolling hills of brown grass and oak...
A Family Quartet out of Tune with Itself
Jane Hamilton has written a novel so disturbing that no one will enjoy reading it. But "Disobedience" is so provocative that you must. Certain books capture the interaction between new technology and old human weakness at just the right moment. In...
A Firestorm in Anthropology
Two years ago, Jared Diamond won a Pulitzer for his book, "Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies." It included a critical assessment of the effects of outside intervention on tribal peoples. Nowhere is there a better case study of this...
An America Divided ; Lack of Mandate for Either Party Could Foster More Gridlock - or Cooperation
When the dust settles and America knows for sure who its next president is and who, exactly, won seats in the House and the Senate, the ultimate question will prevail: Can this new government actually accomplish anything? In theory, of course, the...
A Time to Mourn, and a Time to Dance in Alice Walker's Short Stories
Part fact, part fiction, always strongly rooted in her own experience, the stories that make up Alice Walker's latest book begin with a poignant portrait of the writer as a young married woman. "Thirty years ago," she reflects, "I met, loved and married...
A Weed by Any Other Name Would Spread as Fast
According to the authors of "Nature Out of Place," the Garden of Eden is becoming a lawn full of dandelions. The human penchant for moving people and goods over ever-greater distances in ever-lesser times is wreaking havoc on the earth's most precious...
Cricket, a Gentlemen's Game? That's Balderdash. ; Sticky Wicket: Worldwide Probe Begins into Charges of Match-Fixing by the Game's Greatest Stars
Cricket - long viewed by the English as a game for gentlemen, and by most of mankind as an unfathomable mystery - now finds itself on a sticky wicket. In the sport's most sordid episode to date, a damning Indian report last week accused some of cricket's...
Democracy's Strangest Night
If the American republic and its elections last for 1,000 years, men may still say, "This was their weirdest hour." Carter vs. Ford? A cakewalk. Nixon vs. Kennedy? Straightforward. Garfield vs. Hancock? OK, that was closer, but it was 1880. There...
Divided We Stand ; No Need to Be Glum about the Close Presidential Vote
Before anyone hints at a civil war in the making, Americans might consider the benefits for the nation in being divided over a startlingly close presidential vote. If this were France, the cry would be "viva la difference!" But Americans were bred...
'Do No Harm,' Scientists Are Told
Bill Joy has an interesting idea. The Sun Microsystems chief scientist wants all scientists to take something like the Hippocratic Oath (the pledge doctors make to never use their skills harmfully) to protect humanity from the adverse effects of technology....
Etc
OVER HERE IS THE SWING SET... For many Americans, the Elian Gonzalez saga from earlier this year is a fading memory. But of course, not for everybody. And Delfin Gonzalez, one of the Cuban boy's great uncles, wants to make sure Elian's experience...
Germany Struggles to Revive Shrinking City Centers ; A Housing Report, Due out Friday, Will Recommend Ways to Renovate Old Buildings and Stem Urban Flight
East German urban planners once dreamed of turning this provincial town on the Polish border into the model socialist city, where 100,000 people would live in identical apartment blocks and earn their livelihoods from a gargantuan oil refinery and...
Hold the Beef: Viewers Want Junk-Food News
Until last week, viewers in Chicago had an option not found in most TV markets: a local newscast with long, in-depth stories and no chuckling anchors. Though some people found it a refreshing change, WBBM's nine- month experiment - called PBS on...
How Far Can Military Go in Punishing Obese Soldiers? ; the Pentagon Took Away Bonuses When It Kicked out Servicemen. Now They're Pursuing a Class-Action Suit
Ryan Mumme was born into a military family and planned to make a career from his job as a nuclear technician on a Navy submarine. But in 1998, he received some surprising news - not only would he be kicked out of the military for being overweight,...
How Mrs. Clinton Might Function in Clubby Senate ; Celebrity Will Make Her One of the Most Prominent, and Most Scrutinized, Members
Hillary Rodham Clinton now holds two titles never before strung together: first lady and senator-elect. Her historic and decisive double-digit victory in the New York Senate race gives her a unique status that presents striking advantages, as she...
Initiatives Send Big-Money Backers Scrambling
Thumbs down to school vouchers, campaign-finance reform, and some growth limits. Thumbs up to drug-policy reform and gun control. Mixed signals on tax cuts. These are the themes experts see as they sift through the results of 205 ballot initiatives...
Job Titles from the Middle Ages
Esquire: a knight-wannabe This title of courtesy for an attorney at law used to mean a shield bearer or a knight's personal attendant. Often, the esquires (or squires) were candidates for knighthood themselves. Gradually, the name came to apply...
King Lear Adapts
There's some weather blowing in. For the next two weeks there will be a lot of press about global warming. The reason: a world climate conference in The Hague from Nov. 13 to 24. Sponsored by the United Nations, it's a continuation of the one held...
Mission Intrepid: The World's Civilian Peacekeepers ; When the Shooting Stops, Legions of Good Samaritans Mobilize to Help Conflict-Torn Nations Become Peaceful Civil Societies
This is what Petya Nikolova knows about her new assignment: She has no experience for it; she's not sure which village she will be assigned to; and her training may include tips on how to spot a land mine. "Of course it's a challenge, but I'm eager...
Networks' Crystal Ball Cracks on Election Night ; It's 'Dewey Defeats Truman' Redux as Print and TV Media Fumble over Florida
There's nothing the media hates worse than having egg on its face, but this week, there's a lot of washing up to do. News anchors and newspaper editors were left anguished yesterday after an election that left their credibility in question and raises...
'New Broom' Should Sweep out Old Mideast Policy
Even before America's voting machines have been put back in storage, the Israeli and Palestinian leaders will (separately) be in Washington. Those visits will force hard choices on President Bill Clinton - and especially on his successor. If the...
Power on the Hill Will Pivot on the Moderates ; with a Bare Majority in the House and Senate, the GOP Will Be Forced into Coalition-Building to Move an Agenda
The onus is now on the political leadership in Congress - facing perhaps the tightest party alignment ever, in both House and Senate - to find some way of accomplishing something with their gavels. While Republicans had to be pleased to hang on to...
Readers Write
Television can be watched wisely I wanted to comment on your Nov. 1 article "One family that forgoes screens of all sizes." I write from the ironic perspective of having grown up in a TV-free home, only to go on to star on the ABC sitcom "Boy Meets...
Rising above Victory ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Rudyard Kipling's poem "If" gives several checkpoints of maturity, and one on the list is, "If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster / And treat those two impostors just the same." It's important to rise above defeat, as difficult as that may be....
Tale of a Monkey's Uncle, Deceased
In 1994, two geologists turned the world of archaeology upside down. A Javan fossil led them to claim that man's ancestors left Africa nearly 1 million years earlier than experts had previously thought. Two years later, they struck again: This time...
The Reluctant Leader of the Confederate Forces
Poor Jefferson Davis. In the popular imagination, he is known simply as the earnest man who led the Confederacy to defeat and destruction. Yet as William Cooper demonstrates in this superb biography, Davis spent most of his life as a loyal American...
There's Still Room to Spare for My Son's Fashion Feats
Do you have enough wiggle room for your toes?" the shoe salesman asked my 12-year-old son as he test-walked and hopped in his pricey new sneakers. I wondered if I had enough wiggle room in my checkbook. The salesman dug his thumb into the sneaker...
THE SCOOP on Global Warming ; Climate Trends Are Clear: We're All Going to Adapt to Changing Weather
Warmer temperatures, rising sea levels, and shifting rainfall patterns? "Climate changes," observes Daniel Sarewitz. "Let's deal with it." His approach appears at odds with global efforts to reduce humanity's impact on climate by cutting the amount...
This Bicycle Is Just My Speed
For several months, I pondered buying a new bicycle, but I couldn't talk myself into it. No matter how many new models I sat on, none were as comfortable as the jalopy I bought from a neighbor 15 years ago for $25. It was a three-speed, but over...
Today's Story Line:
Blessed are the peacemakers. Around the world, legions of citizen peacekeepers are aiding nations struggling to form civil societies after armed conflicts end. Often enduring hardship and danger, the peacekeepers watch over elections, monitor human...
USA
With the outcome of the presidential election hanging in the balance, the state of Florida undertook a recount of its vote that officials said would be finished late today. The latest unofficial tally before the Monitor went to press had George W....
Welcome to the Twilight Zone
This is about the time Rod Serling walks in and tells what we have witnessed is a dream or a nightmare or something other than a presidential election. The next stop, up ahead, the twilight zone. As Tuesday night droned on and on and on into Wednesday...
Women Grab More Governorships and US Senate Seats ; in 11 Governors' Races, Only One Sees Party Shift: Democrats Win West Virginia
For all the nail-biting craziness and unprecedented confusion in the national elections this week, one thing is clear: The new faces of American politics increasingly are female. Around the country, the number of women holding gubernatorial seats...
World
The establishment of a Palestinian state is acceptable to Israel's government, but only if it results from joint negotiations and not out of violence, Prime Minister Ehud Barak told other world leaders in a letter. Its contents, Barak's clearest offer...
World Reacts to US Cliffhanger
Oops. The closest presidential race in a century left a lot of splattered egg on the faces of international leaders and media organizations around the globe yesterday. One of the lessons of the 2000 presidential election as seen from afar: Don't...