The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 13, 2001

After Attacks, Some Chinese See Common Cause with US
In the aftermath of the attacks on New York City and Washington, Chinese are already suggesting that the catastrophe might be a means for greater cooperation between the US and China - two states that have been at recent loggerheads. It is too early...
Appreciate Change
September: neither summer nor fall. Its warm days and cool nights call to mind the season just ended, the season soon to begin. In one word: transition. Coping with seasonal change is a lot easier than making changes in the way we live, the way we...
Attacks Show How Much the US Needs Friends
The horror of Tuesday morning holds three immediate lessons for the United States: The first is acknowledged in the parallel many people draw with Pearl Harbor. In 1941, this country wanted to sit out the storm of World War II in official neutrality....
Boston Pastors, Ex-Slave Tell Story ; Legislation Sought to Shut off US Markets to Oil Companies Active in Sudan
Francis Bok used to lie awake at night and wonder if anyone would ever come to free him. Since being swept up by an Arab militia at age seven from his village market in southern Sudan, he had been a slave, beaten daily, and forced to sleep with the...
Controllers' Tale of Flight 11
An American Airlines pilot stayed at the helm of hijacked Flight 11 much of the way from Boston to New York, sending surreptitious radio transmissions to authorities on the ground as he flew. Because the pilot's voice was seldom heard in these covert...
Don't Let Our Values Be a Casualty, Too
We may not know for many days yet how high the human casualties of Tuesday's attacks will mount. But we should take care that some of our country's basic values don't fall casualty to the attacks, too. Things like our capacity to reason calmly, our...
Endgame for EU, NATO in Macedonia? ; the EU Wants NATO to Stay in Macedonia after Its Mandate Expires Late This Month
In the remote mountain village of Radusa in western Macedonia, a T-55 tank bearing the black eagle insignia of the ethnic-Albanian National Liberation Army (NLA) rumbles across the village green. Children look on in awe, as rebel soldiers fire semiautomatic...
For Washington, a Demand for Leadership ; President Bush's Reputation Could Be Cemented by His Handling of Crisis
In the wake of Tuesday's terrorist devastation the great machinery of the United State government faces demands for actions that could define what voters think about Washington leadership for years to come. Issues such as whether the US spends some...
Ghosts of Vietnam Haunt US Policy ; 'Operations Other Than War'
This week, with the horrific terrorist attacks around the country, the United States is learning that foreign wars may not be the country's biggest security concern. A generation ago, this was not the case. The spread of communism and the fall of...
Good Samaritans Offer Solace for Fellow New Yorkers
From the terror comes humanity. Thousands of New Yorkers line up to give blood. A Presbyterian church hands out cups of cold water to parched walkers stranded in the city. Medical students volunteer their services at hospitals. The largest Jewish...
Letters
Calls for compassion in wake of Tuesday's terror As a regular reader of your newspaper from India, I have always appreciated your balanced coverage of events like Tuesday's attacks. I want to emphasize that this is not just an American tragedy, but...
'Look for What's Right' ; Theory of 'Appreciative Inquiry' Takes on a Community's Mental Atmosphere
Bliss Browne had given up divinity school to work in an inner- city parish, but found so much resistance to her ministry that she moved to Chicago and chucked social service for corporate banking. She would later become one of the first female priests...
My Modest Investment Pays Relaxing Dividends
By purchasing a beach chair, I have saved myself tens of thousands of dollars. Now I have no need to buy a summer house. On weekends, I carry the beach chair four blocks from my apartment to Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street, and enter Central Park. Just...
Online Became a Lifeline to Thousands after Terrorist Attack
Among all the things that we learned as a country and as a people yesterday, one of the more lasting (although less urgent) lessons was how important the Internet and the World Wide Web have become as a means of communication and for gathering information...
On the Trail of the Scientists Who Make the Trails ; A Journalist Follows Researchers into the South American Rain Forest to Study the Mystery of Their Devotion
Deep in the tropical rain forest, a small fruit-eating bat carefully nicks the veins on the underside of a philodendron leaf, causing the edges to fold down like a miniature tent. The bat curls up under its little tent and goes to sleep. Other bats...
Palestinians Fear Israeli Crackdowns ; Israel Declared Yesterday a Day of Mourning, as People around the Country Donated Blood and Sent Sympathies
In Jerusalem, near where candles were lit last month for Israeli victims of a suicide bombing by Hamas, the Islamic Resistance Movement, they were flickering again yesterday for the thousands of people who died in Monday's terrorist attacks in New...
Russia Sees New Ally against Terrorists
As Russian citizens tearfully leave flowers and condolence notes in front of the American Embassy in Moscow, their acts of solidarity are underlining how a new US-Russian relationship may be forged in the aftermath of Tuesday's terrorist attacks....
Security Now Top Airport Priority ; after Years of Warnings, Emphasis Is Seen Shifting from Flier Convenience to Safety
Make no mistake about it, after last Tuesday traveling in America will never be the same. For the past decade, as concern about terrorism increased, then ebbed, along with its presence in the headlines, security at the nation's airports has increased...
Seeking Safety in America
Here's a common reaction among Americans to this week's catastrophic plane attacks: "But I thought we were safe!" Yes, by and large, the United States is a safe homeland. But one by one over the past 60 years, large-scale attacks on US soil - from...
Separated by Distance, Bound by Wire
I can't look at a barbed-wire fence without in my mind's eye seeing a pair of supple and sturdy leather work gloves - the sine qua non of stringing wire. Fencing is one of the least enjoyable chores attendant on stock farming, but it has to be done...
Teens Read, and Advertisers See a Green Light
Magazines that are struggling or closing thanks to the weak economy should consider adding "teen" or "girl" to their titles. Business is booming for publications that offer makeover tips and 'N Sync stickers, especially those that have debuted in...
That Warm Family Feeling ; in This Dark Comedy, Everybody Wants to Be Somebody Else, Somewhere Else
The Corrections" represents a giant leap for Jonathan Franzen - not only beyond his previous two novels, but beyond just about anybody else's. This omnivorous comedy about a midwestern family dealing with chronic dysfunctions radiates the kind of...
The Compass Came from Many Directions ; This Short History Spins through Many Inventors' Contributions
It's easy to take familiar things for granted and lose history in the process. That's happened with the magnetic compass. It has become a quaint novelty in the era of Global Positioning Satellites and inertial navigation - useful for hiking, fun to...
The Price for Freedom from Apartheid ; in This First Novel, a White South African Is Forced to Abandon the Woman He Loves
You choose: uncertainty in South Africa or free fall in America. Those are the options according to Danny Divin, the self-exiled white South African in David Schmahmann's "Empire Settings." In the end, free fall feels the most like home to him. Before...
The Spirit of a People
In this national tragedy, as they have in others, Americans are showing a profound readiness to work cooperatively to heal the wounds. Accounts from New York, and from Washington, tell of individuals going to extraordinary lengths to help others....
USA
Thousands of search-and-rescue workers combed through rubble looking for survivors after the World Trade Center buildings collapsed Tuesday in the worst attack on the US since Pearl Harbor. As the Monitor went to press, authorities said they believed...
US Policy in Mideast under Scrutiny ; Mideast Leaders Have Condemned the Attacks, While Some Arabs Express Anger at US Policy
"You have to understand that the bullets that are fired at us, the missiles fired at our homes, and the Apache helicopters that the Israelis use - we know that all these things come from the US, and they are killing Palestinians," says Hani Jubah,...
Western Leaders Call for Better Intelligence Cooperation ; on Tuesday, European Leaders Pledged Their Support in Fighting Terrorism
As the world hunkered down yesterday for fear of further terrorist attacks, Western leaders urged closer international cooperation to block any repetition of the blows that struck America on Tuesday. But intelligence experts suggested that determined...
What's the Right US Response? ; Options Range from Limited Strikes to Declaring War on Terrorism. Behind Them All Lies Question of the 'Just War.'
How the United States responds to this week's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington involves the most difficult, and in some ways the profoundest, questions a nation and its leaders can face: To what extent is retaliation justified, especially...
Winter Gets a Little Greener Up North
Vegetation is becoming denser across northern regions of the northern hemisphere as growing seasons lengthen. Chalk up another consequence of global warming. Two decades worth of satellite data now show "that year to year changes in growth and duration...
World
Osama bin Laden, the Saudi dissident suspected of plotting Tuesday's terrorist attacks in the US remains an honored "guest" in Afghanistan, the ruling Taliban said. But requests by the US to hand him over could be considered after "we study the evidence,"...
World Markets Reel in Aftermath ; Asian Markets Slide, but Europe Stablizes. Investors Are Concerned the Attack May Tip US into a Recession
If Sept. 11th 2001 is a day that will live in infamy, September 12th is one that writhes with uncertainty. Investors and business executives are trying to grasp how profound the impact of the destruction of the World Trade Center in New York City...