The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 22, 2002

A Christian 'Samaritan' with Israeli Visa Trouble
On the surface, Jonathan Miles, an American Christian who specializes in saving the lives of infants, is the last person one would want removed from the nerve center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.Mr. Miles is a rarity in the Middle East and among...
A Court of Second Chances ; in a Tough New York Neighborhood, Justice Means More Than a Quick Ticket to Jail
For two years, Alex Calabrese has presided over a courtroom in one of Brooklyn's toughest neighborhoods. But today, sitting in the former parochial school that houses the Red Hook Community Justice Center, he sounds more like a small-town principal than...
America's Golden History ; Flecks in a River Bed Ignited the California Gold Rush
For H.W. Brands, the California Gold Rush was an accumulation of "hundreds of thousands of small stories of the men and women who traveled to California in pursuit of their common dream." The author of bestselling biographies of Benjamin Franklin and...
A Monitor Guide to Books of September 11 ; A Year after the Attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the Publishing Industry Has Produced More Than 300 Related Books. No Single Event Has Ever Generated So Many, So Quickly. over the Next Few Weeks, We'll Provide Summaries of a Small Selection of These Titles
1INSIDE 9-11Deploying uncommonly vivid and balanced prose, the writers of "Inside 9-11" present a sprawling portrait of Sept. 11 with crystalline clarity. This collection of micro-events - individual moments of heroism and terror, the day-to-day actions...
Atlantic City Reinvents Itself as Vegas East ; Faced with Competition, Resort Town Embarks on Biggest Building Boom in 24 Years. but Will It Work?
When people say you can't miss the new casino in town, they're not kidding. Rising like twin stacks of King Midas' treasure, the $1 billion gold-plated Borgata lords over the marina, the city, and, it would seem, the fortunes of the Eastern seaboard....
A View into Moussaoui's Very Restricted Prison World
This is what Zacarias Moussaoui is forbidden to possess: a comb, a pencil, a ballpoint pen, hot tea, and hot coffee.All are listed as potential terrorist weapons under high- security rules adopted at the federal detention facility in Alexandria, Va.,...
A Woman Who Knows What the Nose Knows ; A Book That Makes Scents of the Least Understood Organ
Marcel Proust once wrote that perfume "is the last and best reserve of the past, the one which when all our tears have run dry, can make us cry again." He was no stranger to the evocative power of scent: the odor of a madeleine dipped in lime-blossom...
Beneath the Surface, a Sisterly Bond Begins
When my husband, Andy, and I made the decision to add another child to our family, our daughter Tessa was 4 years old. We had adopted her from China when she was a baby, and, among our other reasons for wanting a second child, we felt that Tessa should...
Biodetectives Find a Way to Sniff out Anthrax ; A Virus That Naturally Preys on Spores May Help with the Rapid Detection of the Bacteria
As federal authorities begin tests this week on three New Jersey postal centers for traces of anthrax, scientists say they have discovered a potentially powerful, fast method to detect the bacteria's presence.Over the long term, the researchers say,...
Conservative Aussies Shift Approach to Human Rights ; Aligning Itself with the US, Australia Is Increasingly Critical of International Bodies Such as the UN
Historians of the post-World War II era usually give Australia top marks in the field of human rights.It was one of eight countries that drew up the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights in 1948. During the 1970s, both Labor and conservative governments...
Cultivating a Religious Calling among Teens
It's not the usual summer fare for teens, but hundreds of high school youths are venturing into the world of theology, and many are finding it "awesome."In a bid to attract talented young people into the ministry, seminaries and divinity schools across...
Drought Worsens, Affecting Color of Cars, Size of Crops ; as Rains Fall Short, East Coast States Roll out Stringent Water- Conservation Rules
It's back to dirty cars, beige lawns, and no water on the table at the local pizza joint.Yes, drought restrictions - removed in many places in June - are returning. A dry and hot July and August, without much precipitation, is forcing states and communities...
Flood Buoys Germany's Left ; One Month before Elections, the Country's Green Party Has Inched Up in Opinion Polls
As the swarthy flood waters of the River Elbe drain into the North Sea, Germans are just beginning to calculate the enormous costs of this summer's catastrophe.It's estimated that Europe's biggest economy will spend more than $10 billion on the clean-up...
In Defense of the Ivory Tower ; Philosopher Anthony Appiah Argues the Importance of 'Figuring Things Out' over 'Doing'
Come September, philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah will begin teaching at Princeton University, having jumped from Harvard's "dream team" of black scholars recruited by Henry Louis Gates Jr. His move coincides with that of Cornel West, professor of Afro-...
In Nigeria, a Stoning Sentence as Power Play ; Monday's Ruling Upholding the Death Sentence of a Nigerian Woman Highlights Internal Political Rifts
In the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna, it is easy to find the prostitutes. They gather outside the Adamawa government guesthouse each evening, a member of the staff says. "They are there now," he says as three women walk through the gate.This brazenness...
Labor More Militant as Economy Teeters ; from Docks to Hotels, Workers Weigh Strikes. in Airlines and the Public Sector, Unions Face Cutbacks
Union trouble? Potential strike? Is America slipping into a new period of friction between owners and workers?Yes, but don't think baseball park. Think office, hospital, cockpit, shipyards.Far away from the glare of million-dollar athletes and fat TV...
Letters
What caused the energy crisis in California?Regarding your Aug. 19 editorial "Behind the rolling blackouts": Deregulating electric power is a big mistake. Regulation didn't fail California during its energy crisis. The shortfall began when utilities...
My Son Releases the Chef Within
Spencer greeted me as I pulled into the driveway, his friend Tom standing beside him. I'd been expecting to see him painting the house, as per instructions, but I have grown accustomed to such discrepancies. He will be a college freshman in September...
Put the 'Fun' Back into Golf
The last of the four most prestigious professional tournaments ended Sunday, and I, for one, am glad "the Majors" are over. Don't get me wrong. I like seeing golfers hit it farther and putt better than I can even dream. But when I'm watching golf, I'm...
The Power of Deduction ; in the Beginning, Income Taxes Weren't Certain at All, but Then Came War
Could some taxes actually be more "just" than others? Steven Weisman's "The Great Tax Wars," returns to the era when American presidents and their advisers, along with wealthy bankers and populist dreamers, first wrestled with the moral ramifications...
Think before Leaping into War
There should be little mystery about the outcome of an American war on Iraq. History and the neighborhood teach us the necessary lessons. Let us consider two possible scenarios for an attack:First, the fighting may be bloody on both sides and prolonged....
Turn of the Shrew ; Two Small Children Give a Crabby Old Woman a Chance for New Life
No one in Ireland can convey despair better than Sebastian Barry, and considering the hometown competition, that's a remarkable distinction. His previous novel, "The Whereabouts of Eneas McNulty" is a gorgeous, heartbreaking story about a man condemned...
We're Attacking Iraq, Please Don't Tell!
From: Director of CIATo: All Secret Agents (you know who you are)Re: Secret War Plans (shhhhhh!)The President (code name: George W.) is increasingly alarmed about leaks concerning our plans to attack a certain country in the Middle East (rhymes with...