The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 31, 2003

An Honest Intellect Remembered
Even in death, Pat Moynihan continues to surprise. He is being laid to rest Monday not in a family plot somewhere in New York but in Arlington National Cemetery - with full military honors. How many of his admirers and constituents ever knew how proud...
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A Parched African Land Embraces a Bounty of Rainfall
I wanted it. I got it. It's just a bit more than I had bargained for.It's raining in Zimbabwe. It's been raining nonstop for the past six days. It's not the real rainy season, state radio informs us, just a spinoff from a cyclone. A cyclone poshly named...
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Baseball in Wartime? It's Been the American Way since 1861 ; Season Opens for a Sport Uniquely Tied to Military Conflict
When the Pentagon wanted to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Korean War, it made a peculiar decision. It called a special ceremony for an unusual guest: the commissioner of Major League Baseball, who laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns.Baseball...
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Benchmarks toward Victory
Eleven days into the war, it's no surprise US and British forces have hit rough spots, from sandstorms to a suicide attack. But the coalition has shown remarkable flexibility in adapting to new threats. And it's used its overwhelming power and technology...
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Court Takes Up Racial Preferences in Landmark Case ; Debate Tuesday on Affirmative Action in College Admissions Will Have Big Impact
When she applied to attend the University of Michigan Law School, Barbara Grutter was anything but a typical applicant.As a mother of two in her 40s running her own healthcare consulting business, she had considerably more life experience than the average...
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Faith and Family: Sustenance in Combat ; 'Daddy, Scooby-Doo Is Not a Good Name for a Bradley.'
On the eve of their return to the front lines south of Baghdad, soldiers with the 3rd Infantry Division's battle-hardened 3-7th Cavalry Squadron ate a hot meal, loaded up fresh supplies and ammunition, and mapped out their next mission.In breaks from...
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Fool's Tools - for Jolly Jokers and Wicked Wisenheimers
If you're just thinking about it today, you're already too late. Don't even talk to me about switching the salt and sugar, or slipping Play-Doh in the slippers. I don't wait all year for amateurish stunts like that. Martha Stewart is right: Celebrating...
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Fowl Terms Alight on Our Language
Robins: bellwethers or harbingers?In the Middle Ages, a bellwether was a sheep that wore a bell around its neck and led the flock around the countryside. Later, the word applied to any ringleader or person on the forefront of a profession or industry.So,...
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Hostilities Flare Again in America's Other War
As the US-led coalition faces resupply snags and stiff local resistance in Iraq, America's other war also seems to be heating up.Attacks against US troops in southern Afghanistan, the former stronghold of the deposed Taliban regime, have spiked in recent...
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In Iraq, Solar Storms Play Havoc with Communication
On today's digital battlefield, where AA batteries are almost as critical as bullets, researchers are looking for ways to forecast "weather" conditions hundreds of miles up where satellites orbit. Over the past decade, scientists have focused much of...
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In New York, Security's Comfort - and Cost ; A City Calibrates Rising Risks and Shrinking Funds as Sirens Wail and Guards Ride Subways
John Pena sits on a police barricade outside Grand Central Terminal, sipping coffee as he surveys the half-dozen police cars. He shakes his head. "I saw military guys with machine guns in the mezzanine," he says. "To some degree it makes me feel safe,...
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Intense Debate over Timing of Baghdad Siege ; Military Officials Told One Unit That a Pause in US Forces' Push Northward Could Last 35 to 40 Days
As the sun sets in the west, the Arabian sands swallow up a convoy of armed might that snakes incessantly north toward the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers - and the prize target of Baghdad.When the US advance is complete and the siege of...
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In War's Dust, 'Fog,' a Yearning to Communicate
Tuesday night the phone rang at the Alkeysi home in Al Atmeay, a prosperous Baghdad neighborhood near the city's largest university. This sound was, in some ways, more startling than the explosion of a bomb, as Real Alkeysi hadn't even heard from her...
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Job of 'Policing' Companies May Fall More to Insiders
Congress can pass laws, regulators can beef up enforcement, and shareholders can demand more accountability. But when it comes right down to it, making sure a company is operating well - not to mention ethically - is really an inside job.That's where...
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Kurdish Guns Turn South ; an Assault on an Islamic Militant Enclave near Iran Has Freed Kurdish Fighters to Fight Hussein's Regime
The red flame crossed the northern Iraqi sky just as Abbas Sharif was about to perform his evening prayers.A second later something thundered into a hillside a half-mile away. The shock wave blew open the green metal door of Mr. Abbas's mud-walled house....
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Letters
Monitor reporter removed by US from IraqI am the father of a United States marine. If the report is true, Philip Smucker's actions are indefensible. I would hope The Christian Science Monitor (which I respect as a news outlet) will have a definite understanding...
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Mexican Women Say 'No Mas' to Booze
In Mexico's Sierra Gorda, icy rivers cascade down the rugged mountains and torrential rains quench the dark, rich soil. But there's no more alcohol flowing down the throats of the farmers who populate these lush highlands.Fed up with their men spending...
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Mining for Corporate Truth ; Emboldened by Progress on Accounting Standards, Reformers Push for Change across Such Issues as Worker Rights, Ecofriendliness, and Executive Pay
It's one cycle investors can count on: After every crash comes reform.It happened in 18th-century Britain after the collapse of the South Sea Bubble. It happened in early 20th-century America after revelations of corporate corruption and again, with...
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Mitchell Daniels ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast Discussing War and the US Economy
Mitchell Daniels Jr., director of the Office of Management and Budget, was the guest at the Monitor breakfast last Friday. Mr. Daniels is a key member of President Bush's economic team.Daniels received his bachelor's degree from Princeton University...
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Moving Forward
When Maj. Dave Flippo first arrived at the abandoned base in southern Iraq, unexploded ordinance littered the ground and gunfire could be heard popping in the distance.Maj. Flippo, an Air Force logistics officer, was surveying the site to determine what...
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One Toy's Revealing Relaunch ; the Ninja Turtles Are Back - Buff, Tough, and Armed with a Modern Marketing Campaign That Aims to 'Get into Kids' Psyches.'
When the producers of the new "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" (TMNT) cartoon began thinking about a model for the program they launched last month, they did not look to kid culture, but to HBO.4Kids Entertainment, which produces the cartoon and licenses...
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On Two 'Fronts,' the War Grinds on ; A Wave of Suicide Attacks and Fresh Outbursts of Guerrilla Fighting Spur Tactical Shifts, despite an Upbeat Pentagon
Eleven days into the fighting in Iraq, it's clear that two wars are being fought.One is on the ground and in the air: A shifting mix of aerial pounding of Baghdad by US warplanes; dangerous urban fighting in and around cities south of there involving...
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Partisan Lines Harden in Debate over Tax Cuts
Here's a switch: Democrats and liberals are accusing the Republicans of engaging in "class warfare."Ever since the battle over the $1.4 trillion tax cuts in 2001, President Bush and his supporters have tried to squelch talk of the benefits going mostly...
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Reflections on the Second Week of War
Tuesday: Into the stormBy 11 a.m., thick clouds that had been rolling in all morning block out the sun. Forecasters dub it "the mother of all storms." They predict 50-knot winds, dust, rain, and lightning by midnight.Not forecast is how the storm would...
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Reporters on the Job
* SMUCKER ON THE JOB: Reporter Philip Smucker, who was escorted from Iraq by the US Marines, arrived safely in Kuwait on Saturday. His phones, computer, and notebooks were returned.But his removal from the battlefield generated several hundred letters...
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Resisting the Grip of TV War Coverage
Tom Ridge told me to buy the wrong kind of tape to prepare for this situation. He said "duct"; he should've said "video." I should've laid in a six-month supply of movies and comfort food to stay mentally healthy. I'm standing as I recite: "My name is...
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Tatarstan, a Muslim Oasis of Calm in Russia ; despite Some Signs of Foreign Attempts to Radicalize Them, and Some Internal Tensions, Many Tatars Support a Philosophy of Tolerance Known as 'Euro-Islam.'
Almira Adiatullina is set quietly, but stubbornly, on a collision course with the Russian state.She is one of a group of religious activists in Tatarstan, Russia's largest Muslim region, who are challenging a government order to remove their Islamic...
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To Soldiers I've Never Met ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
A couple of days before the fighting began, I heard a young soldier on the radio. He was stationed in Kuwait and said that he and his cohorts didn't feel much support from home in the US. They were aware of all the antiwar protests, and no high-ranking...
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Watching the War at Work: Firms Try to Find a Balance
Every workday, Scott Gross calls lunch about two minutes before noon. That gives his three employees enough time to gather round the kitchen table at his home office before one more person joins them via TV: White House spokesman Ari Fleischer.Mr. Gross,...
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Work & Money Briefs ; Economists Attribute February Drop to Prewar Jitters
Keeping Track: durable-goods ordersOrders to US factories for big-ticket goods fell by 1.2 percent in February, a sign of the struggles facing the nation's hard-hit manufacturing sector.The decline erased part of the 1.9 percent gain in orders registered...
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