The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 3, 2001

Activist Nurtures Faith in Goal of Higher Education for All ; Interview / Irving Fradkin
Irving Fradkin is sitting in a booth at the Highland Spa Restaurant surrounded by clippings from his years as the founder of Dollars for Scholars and his usual coffee and grilled cheese. He offers half of his sandwich in exchange for half of an interviewer's...
Afghan Students in US Reach out to Homeland
Farhad Ahad was 9 years old when the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. Soviet troops surrounded his school and threatened his family. His mother shepherded his five sisters to safety in Pakistan and then came back for him and his father. They fled...
After Coup, Fiji Trial Seeks Truth - and Image Repair ; Monday's Hearing Precedes a Trial That Could Implicate Several Men in the Elite
More than a year after the coup that toppled the island's elected government, the plotters return to court next week in a case Fijians hope will restore the country's image as a peaceful South Pacific democracy. Since the coup, sanctions have battered...
A 'Hello' to Ari Fleischer, the President's Mouthpiece
I dropped by the White House press office the other day, and soon was chatting with press secretary Ari Fleischer. He was busy, looking through a stack of papers as he prepared for his daily briefing of reporters. But when he saw me standing at his...
Bring Back the Trains, Fast
Winglock, gridlock. Shrinking mobility, rising pollution. With airport congestion provoking travelers, gas prices agitating drivers, and six-hour rush hours in some cities, alternatives to auto-air dominance have gained appeal. And, as Amtrak struggles...
Can 'Time' Fix Energy Problems? ; Power-Strapped States Urge Congress to Let Them Extend Daylight Saving Time
Ben Franklin had the idea first: Why not conserve colonialists' candles and barrels of whale oil by resetting clocks to get more daylight in late afternoon and evening? The concept didn't kick in until World War I, when Germany, Britain, and the...
Child-Safety Efforts Hampered by Weak Laws ; Parents Face Uphill Battle to Get Manufacturers to Take Responsibility for Defective Products
Families bought $4.9 billion-worth of infant and toddler products last year. They also borrowed items or received hand-me-downs. But finding out which products are unsafe, or have been the subject of government recalls, is difficult. Now, a parent's...
Courtroom Secrecy Is under Fire in Canada ; the Canadian Supreme Court Is Considering Whether Media Bans Go Too Far
When Clayton Mentuck confessed not once, but five times on videotape to a 1996 murder in Manitoba, Canada, it seemed certain he would spend much of his life behind bars. But then the unexpected happened. The trial judge acquitted Mr. Mentuck, ruling...
For Fireworks Safety, a Brightening Record ; More Regulation Helps Pyrotechnics Drop to No. 170 on the 'Dangerous Products' List
Mark Loyd wends his way like a kid in a candy store through rows of stacked cases of fireworks in his family-owned warehouse. Boxes of fireworks, bearing names such as Hacker Attack and 911, are shrink-wrapped in a rainbow of bright colors. But amid...
It's a Bird, It's a Plane ... No, It's a Grill!
Long known for its spectacular beaches, quaint downtown, and rich whaling history, Nantucket island, off the coast of Massachusetts, is now also home to a dazzling "fire cone." The one-of-a-kind grill, which burns nightly at the White Elephant Inn,...
Keep Microsoft Bundled Up
President Bush's trustbusters face difficult choices in coming up with new remedies for Microsoft's past monopolistic practices. The cursor is now blinking on the government's screen after last week's ruling by a United States appeals court. It confirmed...
Letters
Turn off, tune out, and drop in In his opinion piece, David Perlmutter described his attempts to free his daughter from the perils of television but found that neither he nor his wife, nor their daughter, could cut the cord ("No television? Get real,"...
Made-Up Stories of Real Life ; Interview with Children's Author Andrew Clements
Every day around noon (or at least almost every day), Andrew Clements heads out to his backyard, laptop in hand. In a back corner is a small shed. It has a red door, a desk, a cot, a tiny wood stove, and lots of quiet. The cot was a present from...
Migrant Pickers Roil Watermelon Capital ; as Americans Sit Down to July Fourth Picnics, the Melons Come Ripe with Controversy. Longtime Farmers Feel Outflanked by Newcomers
Randy Myers is a second-generation watermelon grower, and he's got the forearms to prove it. He and his brother Ronnie pull countless melons from the brick- red soil of their 120 acres in Turner County, and they can always be found at the same place...
Modern Efficiency vs. One Task at a Time
The ability to do several things at once has become one of the great measures of self-worth for 21st-century Americans. It's called multitasking, and it takes many forms. As one example, why go out to lunch when you can eat at your desk, talk (or...
Petty Crime or Something More? ; Human Rights Workers in Guatemala Raise Alarm about Recent Cases of Attacks That Go Unsolved
As part of an Amnesty International research mission to Guatemala, Barbara Bocek was trying to document an escalation in abuses against human rights workers. Her research last month was unexpectedly bolstered by first-hand experience. Ms. Bocek...
Russia's Nuclear-Waste Gambit ; A $21 Billion Cash for Trash Plan Is Now before Putin. Critics Say It Will Magnify Safety Problems
The thicket of nettles is chest high as Vladimir Katzenbogen and Nikolai Popov force their way through, searching with Geiger counters and a gamma-ray detector for radioactive hotspots. The brush thickens, then opens up to the bank of a muddy stream...
Same July Fourth, but Main Street Is Changing
As a Santa Fe freight train rumbles into town, heat waves ripple above the flat, wide, Main Street of Newton, Kan. Old redbrick storefronts stand straight and stark against a blue sky. Beyond the railroad tracks, fields of cut wheat straw, and tasseled...
Students Probe the Promise of American Dreams
Ask six people what the "American dream" means to them, and you're likely to get six different answers. To some, it's the chance to pursue their interests; to others, it's the vision of a nice home and a new car. Despite the lure of the concept,...
The Drive for Power ; Environmental Studies Surge - but So Do Energy-Busting Buildings and Amenities
When Andrew Posner wants to make a fruit smoothie in the kitchen blender in his unconventional dorm, he does the natural thing - he hops on a bicycle to generate the power to run it. California's rolling blackouts are no problem for Mr. Posner and...
To Gain an Edge, Firms Hire Sleuths ; This Is a Job for Computer-Savvy Data Browsers, Not James Bond
John Nolan's assignment: Find out everything possible about the CEO of a company targeted for acquisition by another firm. Talk with his friends and rivals. Scour public records and newspaper stories. Glean quirks and details about his personality....
Toward Managed Migration
Mexico and the United States have a historic opportunity to do something about their No. 1 shared problem: illegal immigration. Their recently announced plan to reduce tragic deaths among migrants is a good start. When they meet again this September,...
Turning Grief into a Grass-Roots Movement
Parents of children who were injured or killed while using baby products are turning their grief into a grassroots movement to promote child safety. Ten years before Danny Keysar died when a Playskool Travel-Lite portable crib collapsed, a different...
Well Watered
I used to laugh at the fancy names on bottles of water. Convinced that a boondoggle was being perpetrated on the American public, I refused to buy something I could get for free out of my own tap. That was before Perrier. In the 1980s, the distinctive...
'What's an Audubon?' ; Urban Families Usually See More Graffiti Than Bird Nests. but as the Venerable Environmental Organization Moves Its Mission to Cities, the Most- Asked Question Is:
At first glance, it's not exactly the kind of place where you'd expect to find the Audubon Society. At second glance, it still isn't. In fact, it takes a good five minutes or so to get a handle on what's going on here, in this little corner storefront...
Will for Mideast Peace Looks Weak ; rA June 28 Pledge to Halt Violence Is All but Nullified Following a Weekend of Continued Violence in the Mideast
Once again, a cease-fire between the Israelis and the Palestinians seems ready to crumble. After more than nine months of open conflict, the two sides remain ripe with more than enough anger and antagonism to break a truce. But a more profound reason...